archive

éducation

Namur, January 16, 2022

When the deputy editor of the daily newspaper L’Echo, Serge Quoidbach, invited me, along with the three other participants at the roundtable discussion on the future of Wallonia, to propose a specific project, which was clear and straightforward and which unified all the Region’s stakeholders, I accepted immediately [1]. The specification from Serge Quoidbach, took its inspiration from the analysis of the economist Mariana Mazzucato, who had alluded to the simple, easily understood idea contained in the speech given by President John Fitzgerald Kennedy at Rice University in Houston on 12 September 1962 [2]. In its tagline we choose to go to the Moon in this decade, the President of the United States encapsulated the determination of the forces that would be mobilised, across all sectors of society. For Mariana Mazzucato, author of Mission Economy, A Moonshot Guide to Changing Capitalism, and The Entrepreneurial State [3], this goal, which was achieved in 1969 by the Apollo 11 Mission, stemmed from a new form of collaboration between the public authorities and the business community, resulting in benefits for the whole of society.

 

1. Once a wildcard, now a desirable future

The Wallonia Institute of Technology project, which is part of the 2068 Wallonia Odyssey vision, an operational foresight initiative launched by the Wallonia Union of Companies (UWE), is similar to the goal expressed by President Kennedy. It fully meets the requirement specified by L’Echo: it was conceived during a dialogue between researchers, public authorities, and representatives of the business world. Without divulging any secrets – this entire process has been managed transparently and in a spirit of partnership on the initiative of the managing director of the UWE, Olivier de Wasseige –, the Wallonia Institute of Technology was introduced as a wildcard [4] in October 2019, during a seminar on the impacts of future technological waves in the digital world and artificial intelligence on society and the opportunities and necessities induced for the business community. This seminar, which was held in two sessions, in Crealys (Namur) and then in Wavre, and driven by Pascal Poty (Digital Wallonia) and Antonio Galvanin (Proximus), identified 2030 as the deadline for regaining control of a foresight trajectory deemed hitherto chaotic. The working group felt that the creation of this Wallonia Institute of Technology was the moment when the stakeholders unexpectedly managed to reconfigure the political, territorial, and technological society of Wallonia and unite their efforts around an innovative concept. A most satisfying occasion, therefore.

The idea has flourished during the 2068 Wallonia Odyssey process. Once an unthinkable event, the Wallonia Institute of Technology has become a desirable future and is seen as a response to the long-term challenges in the goals of the vision developed and approved by the dozens of people taking part in the exercise. Discussions were held on creating a Wallonia Institute of Technology (WIT) as a genuine tool for structuring research and development and innovation, launched and funded jointly by the Government of Wallonia in partnership with businesses. The participants felt that, in the redeployment plan for Wallonia, the WIT was probably the most dynamic resource.

The vision specifies this tool: based on universities which have themselves been modernised, drawing inspiration from the German Fraunhofer models, the Carnot Institutes in France, and the Flemish VIB (Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie) and IMEC (Interuniversity MicroElectronics Centre) initiatives, this fundamental initiative has ended the fragmented nature of research in Wallonia.

 By rationalising the numerous research centres, Wallonia has now reached a critical European size in terms of R&D.

 In addition, this action represents an integration template for all the ecosystems in Wallonia dating back to the start of the 21st century, which are too individualistic, too dispersed and too local.

 Based on technological convergence, and geared towards a more environmentally friendly future, the mission of the WIT is to focus on concrete solutions for the benefit of society, through businesses, based on the thematic areas supported by the competitiveness clusters, including plans for energy transition, energy storage, carbon capture at source, and sustainable and carbon-neutral cities.

These resources have encouraged the capitalisation of human intelligence, which has given meaning and energy to the younger generations through their mastery of technology and their job-creating competitiveness [5].

This action supported by the UWE is still in progress and is being adapted and adjusted based on the work being undertaken to monitor ongoing changes. Consideration of the strategy also raises the question of whether the desirable is possible. There are two parts to this question: firstly, are we capable of bringing the research organisations together to form critical European masses, and of overcoming the causes, both historical and institutional, of fragmented research? Secondly, do we have the budgetary resources to mobilise the research and development community, as Flanders has been able to do?

These questions are not new. They were put to the Regional Foresight College of Wallonia which, during its Wallonia 2030 and Bifurcations 2019 and 2024 exercises, discussed the long-term challenges associated with research and development. These mainly involved the necessary critical mass at the European level to address the fragmented nature of the research centres and their obvious competition, particularly in the context of calls for projects linked to European Structural Funds [6]. In parallel, the work undertaken by The Destree Institute in 2016 and 2017 on behalf of the Liège-Luxembourg Academic Pole revealed the limited public investment in R&D in Wallonia and, at the same time, the outperformance of one province – Walloon Brabant – and of one particular sector – life sciences, boosted by the company GSK. In 2017, apart from the new province, all the provinces of Wallonia had a total R&D expenditure per inhabitant lower than the European average (628 euro/inhabitant), the average of Wallonia (743.30 euro/inhabitant) and the Belgian average (1,045.50 euro/inhabitant). The total R&D expenditure in Walloon Brabant that year (the most recent year available in the Eurostat data) was 3,513.60 euro per inhabitant.

It is worth mentioning that, in Wallonia, 77% of R&D is carried out by businesses, 21% by universities, and less than 1% by the public authorities (figures for 2017). In addition, as also highlighted in the report of the Scientific Policy Council in 2020, the public authorities, as performers of R&D, play a very marginal role in the Wallonia Region. This is explained by the fact that the Wallonia Region has few public research centres [7].

This data, which highlights the fragility of the R&D landscape in Wallonia, justified the need to develop a process for closer integration of the research centres, in addition to the networking effort implemented by Wal-Tech for the approved research centres [8]. Nevertheless, on the one hand, this approach seems rather modest in the light of the challenges we are facing and, on the other, contact with the field shows that the stakeholders’ intentions appear to be a long way from integration, with each organisation jealously guarding its own, generally rather meagre, patch. The real question is whether anyone thinks that the Region is able to provide 600 or 700 million euro annually to create a IMEC [9] in Wallonia.

 

2. The exponential rate of technological development requires a commonality of interest and of resources

As an astute observer of technological trends, the analyst and multi-entrepreneur Azeem Azhar rejected the notion that technology is a neutral force, separate from humanity, that will develop outside society. It is, however, closely linked to the way in which we approach it, even if it remains fundamentally difficult, in an era of exponential technological development, to say how new innovations will transform our society. Such innovations interact constantly in our relationships with the economy, work, politics and our living environments. As the exponential era accelerates, observes Azhar, so general-purpose technologies disrupt our rules, norms, values and expectations and affect all our institutions. For this reason, he concludes, we need new forms of political and economic organisation[10]. He is thinking, naturally, of institutions that are sufficiently resilient, in other words, robust enough to handle constant change and flexible enough to adapt quickly. But, above all, we need to construct institutions that allow disparate groups of people to work together, cooperate and exchange ideas, which Azhar refers to as commonality [11]. More than simple cooperation or partnership, this commonality seems to be a genuine sharing of interests, resources and available assets to address challenges[12].

This idea of commonality is what led us, several years ago, to argue in favour of a University of Wallonia established across five or six geographical centres: the University of Wallonia in Mons, the University of Wallonia in Charleroi, the University of Wallonia in Liège, the University of Wallonia in Louvain-la-Neuve, the University of Wallonia in Namur, and the University of Wallonia in Brussels – if the Free University of Brussels (ULB) and the University Saint-Louis want to come on board [13]. The National Fund for Scientific Research (FNRS) would be included in this list, particularly as we believe it to be exemplary in certain respects. The rights and powers of the University of Wallonia would be exercised by the Board of its Governors and Directors: the President of the University, the rectors of each of the constituent universities throughout their term, the representatives of the university community (students, scientific staff, teaching faculty, technical staff), and eight qualified people appointed by the Government of Wallonia, including four prominent foreign individuals and four individuals from the private research and business sector. The Board of the Governors would be chaired by the President of the University of Wallonia, appointed for five years by the government of Wallonia on a proposal from the Board of the Governors. The President would deal exclusively with the work and duties associated with their position. The President and the Board of the Governors would ensure consistency and coordination of the research and teaching activities between the constituent universities through a policy of excellence, specialisation, and integration of the various sections, departments, institutes and research centres. The University of Wallonia would also include all University colleges and institutions offering short-term higher education in Wallonia.

This reform is based on radical empowerment and accountability for the university sector which, as a result, has a coherent decision-making structure for achieving objectives set collectively with representatives of society. It also allows each higher education and research institution to take its place within a group and contribute to developing a common trajectory and plan for society and citizens and for businesses, including associations. The latter will be able to help fund the university research and training, all the more so since they will be close to it and involved in it [14].

We should add that it is within this radically reworked framework of our higher education and research landscape that we want to position the Wallonia Institute of Technology (WIT), not by taking our inspiration from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as part of a privatisation approach, but based instead on outstanding quality and openness to the world, to society and to businesses. This restructured university environment in Wallonia must also be consistent with the notions of scientific independence and creative potential, also inspired by the FNRS[15], which represent the best aspects of these institutions. It is, therefore, the commonality approach that must inspire them, including those that, today, are not part of the group.

 

3. The Wallonia Institute of Technology: A simple job?

Well, no, implementing this plan by 2030 is not straightforward. Nor was it for JFK and NASA to land their countrymen on the moon. But this was the requirement specified by the newspaper L’Echo. And long before this, as I have also mentioned, it was the 2068 Wallonia Odyssey initiative of the UWE and its 600 or more individual and institutional partners.

I will take the plunge by describing The Wallonia Institute of Technology, and then outlining the principles and the funding of this body within the University of Wallonia.

3.1. The Wallonia Institute of Technology is, like its Massachusetts counterpart, a multidisciplinary research institute specialising in technological convergence and dedicated to science and innovation. It is a central creation of the new University of Wallonia, and of the Government of the federal entity Wallonia, which has entered contractual relations with all the former universities to engender a new research and development and innovation approach for the benefit of citizens and businesses. In addition to the fundamental and applied research funds formerly allocated by the Wallonia Region and the French Speeking Community for the benefit of the universities, the Government has provided one billion euro per year to fund this initiative. These funds have been transferred from the regional support packages allocated to businesses, employment, and research (3.3 billion euro in the initial 2019 budget for the Wallonia Region). The initiative is supported and integrated into the Walloon economic ecosystem by the University, which now enjoys full autonomy, while the public authorities look after the partnership assessment of the impacts and results and check the legality of the decisions and expenditure in accordance with the management contract that is to be drawn up.

3.2. The principles on which the WIT is established within the University of Wallonia

3.2.1. Neither the University of Wallonia nor the Wallonia Institute of Technology require any additional structures. It is a question of integrating the existing tools into a polycentric approach with the philosophy of pooling and optimising resources based on a common vision in which the scientific, educational, and social roles are clearly redefined.

3.2.2. The University and the WIT have complete autonomy (including budgetary) from the Government, other than monitoring the impact analysis of the annual budget, which must comply with the decree that redefined the landscape and granted strategic autonomy to the University of Wallonia, including the WIT. Michel Morant and Emmanuel Hassan, on behalf of the LIEU network, drew on the works of the European University Association recently to highlight the benefits of university autonomy: academic autonomy, to determine student admissions, selection criteria, programmes and content, etc., organisational autonomy, to select, appoint and reject the academic authorities based on their own criteria, include external members in their governance organs, etc., financial autonomy, to manage the surpluses at their disposal, borrow, determine student registration fees, etc., and, lastly, human resources management autonomy, enabling universities to decide the recruitment procedures for academic and administrative staff, determine salaries, promotion criteria, etc. According to the authors, greater university autonomy appears to be a major factor in institutionalising the transfer of knowledge[16]. All these types of autonomy should be applicable to the University of Wallonia, whose mission will be to align the various standards in a cost-effective way.

3.2.3.  The auditing and partnership assessment for the new venture will be managed by the Court of Auditors, on the initiative of the Parliament of Wallonia.

3.2.4. The Wallonia Institute of Technology is an integrator of strategic fundamental research and high-level applied research. It engages in technological convergence and focuses on a few specific axes, under the supervision of the University’s Council of Governors and with the support of its scientific committee.

3.2.5. The purpose of the University is universal, and its territory is Europe and the world. The University of Wallonia will therefore capitalise on the international and interregional networks and partnerships established by each of its constituent institutions. Strengthening its influence in the European research and higher education sector should enable it to improve the calibre and quality of its key personnel.

3.3. Funding for the University of Wallonia and the WIT

3.3.1. The University of Wallonia has a total annual budget of around two billion euro from funds of the French Speeking Community of Belgium (1.6 billion euro)[17] and the Wallonia Region (around 300 million euro). The budget of the FNRS and the associated funds (around a hundred million euro from the French Community) are included in this figure [18].

3.3.2. The Wallonia Institute of Technology has a further sum of one billion euro, from the Wallonia Region support package for businesses, employment and research.

3.3.3. The mission of the approved research centres is to join this scheme, along with their regional funding, which should be encouraged by the Region and approved by the University of Wallonia.

I have been asked whether the Government and its administration will be sidelined by the autonomy of this scheme. That is certainly not the case. Both institutions relinquish their power of initiative in favour of a safeguarding role upstream and downstream of the process. For even a hopeless optimist like myself knows the major risk facing this project: that the universities remain committed to the old paradigm that of compromises and sharing resources, influences, and territories. And they excel in this area, as we know. Quite the opposite of the commonality promoted in this text.

 

Conclusion: the requirement to revolutionise our strategies and ways of thinking

The constitution of a Wallonia Institute of Technology, an organisation attracting laboratories and research centres into the university environment of genuine strategic and budgetary capability that is the University of Wallonia, could be the ideal time to implement a different regime to those described by Nathan Charlier for Flanders and Wallonia, which, ultimately, fail to meet the expectations both governments and societies and of researchers [19]. A new, ambitious model, conceived within a framework of autonomy and pragmatism, could go beyond the regimes of Science, Endless Frontier and economising the value attributed to research by strategic science, without being indifferent to society or to industrial application. Modernisation of fundamental research could be achieved in Wallonia through the independent decisions of the Council of Governors, which would recall the precepts of former European Commissioner Philippe Busquin, who always considered it necessary to allocate a large proportion of resources to fundamental research, believing it was, in the long term, a key element of innovation[20]. But without neglecting thorough applied research and keeping a constant eye on the business environment.

Tools such as Welbio [21] or Trail [22] would be invaluable for building effective interfaces, but there are others in other fields. The competitiveness clusters, possibly restricted in number and better financed, could continue their role as integrators of commercial, research and training activities in specific intersecting and promising fields, both regionally and internationally.

In addition, the challenges are not only in the area of research. While mention is frequently made – and rightly so – of the importance of science, technology, engineering, and maths (STEM), it is also time, as Azeem Azhar reminds us, to bring about a reconciliation between science and literature (humanities), the two cultures highlighted back in 1959 by Charles Percy Snow (1905-1980) [23] and still as far apart as ever. There are new frontiers to be crossed in the areas of teaching and higher education. Furthermore, Mieke De Ketelaere, a researcher at IMEC and an artificial intelligence expert, recently underlined the long-term importance of human skills: children, she writes, must prepare themselves for a digital future in which social skills have their place. Let us not take these skills away from them by making them think like computers [24].

Like going to the Moon in the 1960s, the creation of The Wallonia Institute of Technology at the heart of the University of Wallonia is a formidable challenge for the region and a vital tool for its necessary transformation. In his 1962 speech, mentioned above, President Kennedy outlined his motivation, which could also be ours.

We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too [25].

This path requires us to revolutionise our strategies and our ways of thinking. To surpass ourselves.

Some will say it is impossible. Others, those on whom we rely, will get down to work.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

 

[1] This text is based on the background paper written for the panel organised by the newspaper L’Écho, Quatre personnalités se penchant sur l’avenir de la Wallonie, Le territoire wallon mine d’or pour l’emploi, Panel hosted by Serge QUOIDBACH, Alain NARINX, François-Xavier LEFEVRE and Benoît MAHIEU, with Florence Bosco, Isabelle Ferreras, Marie-Hélène Ska, and Philippe Destatte, in L’Écho, 18 December 2021, p. 15-18.

[2] Mariana MAZZUCATO, Mission Economy, A Moonshot Guide to Changing Capitalism, p. 3, Dublin, Allen Lane, 2021.

[3] M. MAZZUCATO, The Entrepreneurial State, Debunking Public vs Private Sector Myths, New York, Public Affairs, 2015.

[4] In foresight, a wildcard is an unexpected, surprising and unlikely event which may have considerable impacts if it occurs.

[5] Odyssée 2068, Une vision commune porteuse de sens, Finalité 2: https://www.odyssee2068.be/vision

[6] See also Ph. DESTATTE, La Wallonie doit reprendre confiance!, in Wallonie, Review of [Economic and Social Council of Wallonia, no.129, February 2016, p. 51-53: https://phd2050.org/2016/03/02/cesw/  – Ph. DESTATTE, Des jardins d’innovations: un nouveau paradigme industriel pour la Wallonie, Blog PhD2050, Namur, 11 November 2018: https://phd2050.org/2016/11/11/ntiw/

[7] Évaluation de la politique scientifique de la Wallonie et de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, 2018 and 2019, p. 48/103, CESE Wallonie, Pôle Politique scientifique [Scientific Policy Centre], December 2020.

[8] Wal-Tech, Mission: https://www.wal-tech.be/fr/mission/

[9] IMEC: https://www.imec-int.com/en/about-us

[10] Azeem AZHAR, Exponential, How Accelerating Technology is leaving us behind and what to do about it?, p. 254-258, London, Random House Business, 2021.

[11] A. AZHAR, Exponential…, p. 255.

[12] Commonality, the state of sharing features or attributes, a commonality of interest ensures cooperation. Angus STEVENSON ed., Oxford Dictionary of English, Oxford University Press, 3rd ed., 2010.

[13] Integration of the ULB and the UCLOUVAIN sites in Brussels, including Saint-Louis, would make it possible to dispense with difficult discussions such as those mentioned by Vincent VANDENBERGHE, Réflexions en matière de financement de l’enseignement supérieur en Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, Louvain-la-Neuve, 8 July 2021.

https://perso.uclouvain.be/vincent.vandenberghe/Papers/Memo_financementEnsSup_2021.pdf

[14] Ph. DESTATTE, L’Université de Wallonie pour pousser jusqu’au bout la logique de mutualisation, Blog PhD2050, Namur, 14 April 2014, https://phd2050.org/2014/04/14/uw/

[15] I am thinking of the debate initiated by the minister Jean-Marc Nollet in July 2013 on the notion of possible societal impacts of research. See Nathan CHARLIER, Gouverner la recherche entre excellence scientifique et pertinence sociétale, Une comparaison des régimes flamand et wallon de politique scientifique, p. 73-74, Liège, Presses universitaires de Liège, 2021.

[16] Michel MORANT et Emmanuel HASSAN, Vers un nouveau modèle pour la valorisation universitaire? Étude d’impact et d’évolution visant à améliorer la valorisation des résultats de la recherche universitaire, Report produced for the Minister for Higher Education and Research, p. 149-150, Liège, Réseau Liaison Entreprises-Universités, 31 October 2020.

[17] Projets de décrets comprenant les budgets pour l’année 2022 de la Communauté française, Rapport approuvé par la Chambre française de la Cour des Comptes, 26 November 2021, p. 27/63.

[18] The amounts have been identified based on the initial 2019 budget.

[19] Nathan CHARLIER, Gouverner la recherche entre excellence scientifique et pertinence sociétale…, p. 272 et seq.

[20] Laurent ZANELLA, L’Europe a besoin de plus d’Europe, avec Philippe Busquin, dans FNRS News, 121, February 2021, p. 42.

[21] Welbio is a virtual institute offering research programmes in the health sector (cancer, immunology, neurobiology, microbiology, metabolic diseases, asthma, cardiology, etc.). Welbio is involved, as a representative mission of the Walloon Region, in the Fonds de la recherche fondamentale stratégique [Strategic Fundamental Research Fund] (FRFS), a specialist fund of the FNRS. Welbio, in FNRS News, June 2021, no. 122, p. 16. – Céline RASE, WELBIO: le pas de la recherche fondamentale vers l’industrie, dans FNRS News, October 2019, p. 52-53.

[22] Launched on 10 September 2020, the objectives of TRAIL (TRusted AI Labs) is to offer all operators in the socio-economic sector the expertise and tools developed in the field of artificial intelligence by the five French-speaking universities (UCLouvain, UMONS, ULB, ULiège and UNamur) and the four approved research centres working in AI (Cenaero, CETIC, Multitel and Sirris) in partnership with the Agence du Numérique and AI4Belgium. TRAIL helps to mobilise research and innovation capabilities in the Walloon and Brussels Regions to support their socio-economic development in the field of artificial intelligence in line with the regional policies pursued in this field. https://trail.ac/

[23] Charles Percy SNOW, The Two Cultures, Cambridge University Press, 2012. – A. AZHAR, op. cit., p. 7.

[24] Geertrui Mieke DE KETELAERE, Homme versus machine, L’intelligence artificielle démystifiée, p. 168, Kalmthout, Pelckmans, 2020.

[25] John F. KENNEDY, Moon Speech – Rice Stadium, September 12, 1962, https://er.jsc.nasa.gov/seh/ricetalk.htm

Mons, 21 octobre 2021

Professeur d’histoire à la Sorbonne depuis 1812, haut fonctionnaire sous la Restauration, François Guizot (1787-1874) effraie le pouvoir par ses idées libérales et est suspendu d’enseignement de 1822 à 1824. C’est pendant cette période qu’il écrit les œuvres historiques majeures que sont l’Histoire de la révolution d’Angleterre, l’Histoire de la civilisation en Europe, l’Histoire de la civilisation en France, travaux qui, à l’époque, le font reconnaître comme l’un des meilleurs historiens de son temps [1]. Esprit scientifique, il est l’un des premiers – notamment après le chanoine liégeois Jean Chapeaville (1551-1617)  [2] – à pratiquer la note en bas de page, c’est-à-dire la référence aux sources, et à développer un apparat critique recourant aux documents de première main [3]. Élu député au début 1830, Guizot devient ministre de l’Intérieur dans le gouvernement issu de la Révolution de Juillet qui a fait de Louis-Philippe le roi des Français. Ministre de l’Instruction publique de 1832 à 1837, puis des Affaires étrangères, il joue un rôle politique de premier plan, allant jusqu’à assumer les fonctions de président du Conseil. Libéral conservateur, opposé au suffrage universel, il chute avec le roi lors de la Révolution de 1848 et revient à ses recherches historiques pour se consacrer à l’écriture jusqu’à la fin de sa vie [4].

 

1. Quelques questions concernant la relation entre un sujet et un objet

En 1820, alors que ses amis politiques sont écartés des affaires de l’État et qu’il enseigne à Paris, des auditeurs de ses cours ont compilé leurs notes en vue de publier ses leçons sur l’Histoire des origines du Gouvernement représentatif en Europe. Ayant retrouvé du temps, le Guizot retiré de la politique commence enfin le travail de révision nécessaire et publie lui-même ses leçons à Paris en 1851, puis très vite à Londres et en anglais, dès l’année suivante. Lors du discours d’ouverture de son cours, le 7 décembre 1820, le professeur aborde d’emblée la relativité des faits historiques. Ceux-ci, note Guizot, s’ils n’acquièrent ou ne perdent rien de leur contenu avec le temps qu’ils traversent, ne vont livrer leur sens que progressivement et les regards qui se porteront sur leur signification révéleront de nouvelles dimensions : l’homme apprend par-là, écrit-il, que, dans l’espace infini ouvert à sa connaissance, tout demeure constamment inépuisable et nouveau pour son intelligence toujours active et toujours bornée [5]. La difficulté dont le professeur fait part à ses étudiants réside au cœur même de l’objectif qu’il assigne à son cours : décrire l’histoire des institutions publiques en Europe à la lecture de ce moment particulier du nouvel ordre politique qui vient d’émerger en 1815. Il s’agit pour Guizot de rattacher ce que nous sommes à ce que nous avons été, et même – magnifique formule -, de renouer enfin la chaîne des temps [6].

François Guizot (1787-1874) – Portrait affiché par Laurent Theis

Le problème qu’observe Guizot, c’est que l’étude des institutions anciennes, en s’appuyant sur les idées et institutions modernes, pour les éclairer ou les juger, a été fort négligée. Et quand, cela a été fait, dénonce-t-il, ce fut avec un dessein si arrêté, que les fruits du travail étaient corrompus d’avance.

Les opinions partiales et conçues avant l’examen des faits ont ce résultat que non seulement elles altèrent la rectitude du jugement, mais encore, qu’elles entraînent, dans les recherches que l’on pourrait appeler matérielles, une légèreté déplorable. Dès qu’un esprit prévenu a recueilli quelques documents et quelques preuves à l’appui de son idée, il s’en contente et s’arrête. D’une part, il voit dans les faits ce qui n’y est point ; de l’autre, quand il croit que ce qu’il tient lui suffit, il ne cherche plus. Or, tel a été parmi nous l’empire des circonstances et des passions qu’elles ont agité l’érudition elle-même. Elle est devenue une arme de parti, un instrument d’attaque ou de défense ; et les faits, impassibles et immuables, ont été invoqués ou repoussés tour à tour, selon l’intérêt ou le sentiment en faveur duquel ils étaient sommés de comparaître, travestis ou mutilés [7].

On voit l’actualité de l’analyse faite par Guizot : la difficulté d’aborder des questions politiques relativement proches dans le temps, mais perçues comme lointaines par l’ampleur du changement des conditions institutionnelles, aussi brutales que celles qui peuvent s’opérer dans une révolution ou un changement profond de régime.

Ce qu’il met en évidence, c’est le péril qui guette l’enseignant, le chercheur, l’intellectuel – je n’ignore pas que je commets un anachronisme en utilisant ce mot en 1820 ou même en 1850. En particulier, Guizot pointe la difficulté de parler ou d’écrire de manière neutre, objective, sans passion, avec le recul qui est attendu de la fonction ou du métier de celui qui s’exprime, et de s’approcher de la vérité, voire de la dire. Les questions de l’analyse des sources, de la déontologie du scientifique, de la logique en tant que conditions de la vérité et de la relation entre un sujet et un objet dont il se saisit [8], de la critique historique sont au cœur de ce travail sur soi. On peut dès lors faire appel aux notions d’heuristique, ici, la recherche des sources sur lesquelles baser sa recherche et, au-delà, son enseignement, qui précède l’herméneutique, c’est-à-dire leur interprétation.

 

2. L’apocalypse cognitive

Dans la leçon qu’il présente à ses étudiants, Guizot met à la fois en évidence le risque de se satisfaire trop rapidement d’une maigre collecte de sources qui viendrait à l’appui d’une hypothèse énoncée préalablement sans vraiment la fonder. L’interprétation erronée des documents fait suite à l’indigence des données face aux ambitions et aux nécessités de la démonstration. La passion et l’engagement fondés sur la légèreté de l’argumentation menacent la qualité de la connaissance, tandis que l’érudition devient un instrument partisan. Combien de fois ne rencontrons-nous pas cette situation dans un monde où, pourtant, l’enseignement – notamment supérieur – se démocratise ?

Guizot, qui, comme ministre, a jadis ressuscité l’Académie des Sciences morales et politiques, verrait aujourd’hui un autre scientifique, membre de l’Académie des Technologies et de l’Académie nationale française de Médecine, lui tendre la main. À peine plus de deux siècles après les déclarations que nous avons mises en exergue, Gérald Bronner constate dans son ouvrage choc Apocalypse cognitive que les vingt premières années du XXIe siècle ont instauré une dérégulation massive du marché des idées. Nous constatons en effet avec le professeur de sociologie à l’Université de Paris que ce marché cognitif est à la fois marqué par la masse cyclopéenne et inédite dans l’histoire de l’humanité des informations disponibles et aussi par le fait que chacun peut y verser sa propre représentation du monde. De surcroît, pour Bronner, cette évolution a affaibli le rôle des gate keepers traditionnels que sont les académiques, les experts, les journalistes, etc., tous ceux qui étaient jadis considérés comme légitimes pour participer au débat public et y exerçaient une salutaire fonction de régulation [9].

C’est un certain pessimisme qui se dégage des analyses de Bronner quant à la capacité qui est la nôtre de faire face à cette situation. Au moins trois raisons y sont invoquées : d’abord, la fameuse « loi de Brandolini » ou principe d’asymétrie des idioties (Brandolini’s Law or Bullshit Asymmetry Principle). Le programmeur italien Alberto Brandolini constatait en 2013 que la quantité d’énergie nécessaire pour réfuter des idioties est supérieure à celle qu’il faut pour les produire [10]. Trouvera-t-on en effet, chacun d’entre nous, le temps, la force et le courage pour faire face au baratinage, aux analyses simplistes, voire aux infox ? Sur les réseaux sociaux, nombreux sont les universitaires qui renoncent.

Dans son beau livre sur Le courage de la nuance, l’essayiste Jean Birnbaum rappelait judicieusement la communication de Raymond Aron (1905-1983) devant la Société française de Philosophie en juin 1939. Face à la montée des périls, le grand intellectuel français appelait ses collègues à mesurer leur engagement : je pense, disait l’auteur de l’Introduction à la philosophie de l’histoire [11], que les professeurs que nous sommes sont susceptibles de jouer un petit rôle dans cet effort pour sauver les valeurs auxquelles nous sommes attachés. Au lieu de crier avec les partis, nous pourrions nous efforcer de définir, avec le maximum de bonne foi, les problèmes qui sont posés et les moyens de les résoudre [12].

Pour suivre, Bronner fait appel à une grande conscience du milieu du siècle de Guizot : Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859). Plus résolument démocratique que son contemporain, l’auteur de La Démocratie en Amérique (1835), y écrit qu’il n’y a, en général, que les conceptions simples qui s’emparent de l’esprit du peuple. Une idée fausse, mais claire et précise, aura toujours plus de puissance dans le monde qu’une idée vraie, mais complexe [13]. Certains d’entre vous ont peut-être encore en tête cette excellente caricature de Wiley Miller, publiée dans The Intellectualist, en 2015, où l’on voit une foule progressant vers un ravin sur un chemin fléché « Answers simple but wrong » tandis que quelques rares individus se dirigent au loin sur un chemin sinueux après avoir, livre en main, choisi la direction « Complex but right ». Au-delà du sens commun des mots, l’analyse des systèmes complexes, chère à William Ross Ashby (1903-1972), Norbert Wiener (1894-1964), Herbert Simon (1916-2001), Ludwig von Bertalanffy (1901-1972), Jean Ladrière (1921-2007), Edgar Morin, Jean-Louis Le Moigne, Ilya Prigogine (1917-2003) et Isabelle Stengers, – pour ne citer que ceux-là – restent souvent en dehors du champ de connaissance de nos chaires universitaires et donc de nos étudiantes et étudiants.

Enfin, Bronner constate que la voracité de notre cerveau ne nous conduit pas mécaniquement vers les modèles de la science. Même lorsque nous avons un appétit de connaissance, ajoute-t-il, celui-ci peut facilement être détourné par la façon dont est éditorialisé le marché cognitif. Ainsi en est-il, par exemple, de la confusion entre corrélation et causalité, bien illustrée par le slogan nazi « 500.000 chômeurs : 400.000 Juifs » [14]. Ce mécanisme semble connaître des résurgences permanentes. Mais il en est d’autres, et dans tous les domaines. Ainsi, en 1978, le parti fasciste français Front national affichait : « Un million de chômeurs, c’est un million d’immigrés de trop ! La France et les Français d’abord ! » [15] Un autre exemple est l’affiche que Nigel Farage a dévoilée à Westminster à la mi-juin 2016, une semaine avant le référendum du BREXIT du 23 juin. L’animateur de radio britannique et leader du Parti pour l’Indépendance du Royaume-Uni – UK Independance Party (UKIP) a utilisé une image avec le slogan : Point de rupture : l’Union européenne nous a tous fait défaut et le sous-titre : nous devons nous libérer de l’UE et reprendre le contrôle de nos frontières. La photographie utilisée était celle de migrants traversant la frontière entre la Croatie et la Slovénie en 2015, avec la seule personne blanche visible sur la photographie masquée par une zone de texte. Nombreux sont ceux qui ont réagi en observant que prétendre que la migration vers le Royaume-Uni ne concerne que les personnes qui ne sont pas blanches revient à colporter le racisme. Cette polémique a poussé Boris Johnson à prendre ses distances avec cette campagne de Nigel Farage [16].

Le fait d’avoir trouvé des exemples particulièrement clivants, pour ne pas dire détestables, pourrait affaiblir l’idée que chacun de nous est susceptible de ne faire, en pure logique, que démontrer ce qui n’est que préjugé. Nous commençons souvent le processus de jugement par une tendance à parvenir à une certaine conclusion. Dans leur livre Noise: A Flaw of Human Judgment (Pourquoi nous faisons des erreurs de jugement et comment les éviter), le Prix Nobel d’Économie Daniel Kahneman, Olivier Sibony et Cass R. Sinstein donnent un excellent exemple illustrant une perspective de pensée qu’ils appellent biais de conclusion, ou préjugement : le collaborateur de George Lucas dans le développement du scénario du Retour du Jedi, le troisième film de Star Wars lui a proposé de tuer Luke et de laisser la princesse Leia prendre le relais. Lucas a rejeté l’idée, n’étant pas d’accord avec les différents arguments et répondant qu’on ne tue pas les gens comme cela, et enfin qu’il n’aimait pas cette idée et n’y croyait pas.

Star Wars, Le Retour du Jedi (1983)

Comme les auteurs de Noise l’ont observé, en affirmant « ne pas aimer » avant « ne pas croire », Lucas a laissé sa pensée rapide et intuitive du système 1 suggérer une conclusion [17]. Lorsque nous faisons ce processus, nous allons directement à la conclusion et contournons simplement le processus de collecte et d’intégration d’informations, ou nous mobilisons la pensée du système 2 – engageant une pensée délibérative – pour proposer des arguments qui soutiennent notre préjugé. Dans ce cas, ajoutent le prix Nobel d’économie et ses collègues, les preuves seront sélectives et déformées : en raison du biais de confirmation et du biais de désirabilité, nous aurons tendance à collecter et interpréter les informations de manière sélective pour justifier un jugement auquel nous croyons déjà [18]. Partout où l’on regarde, les préjugés sont évidents, concluent les trois professeurs. Lorsque les gens décident ce qu’ils croient en fonction de ce qu’ils ressentent, le psychologue Paul Slovic, professeur à l’Université de l’Oregon, nomme ce processus heuristique de l’affect [19].

 

3. L’heuristique comme une forme de résistance des esprits éclairés

Comme souvent, aux raisons de désespérer, nous pouvons opposer des raisons de nous réjouir et d’espérer. Celles-ci résident à mon sens dans la force que constitue l’heuristique, les techniques et la ou les méthodes scientifiques.

Par heuristique, on désigne généralement l’ensemble des produits intellectuels, des procédés et des démarches qui favorisent la découverte ou l’invention dans les sciences. Deux dimensions peuvent être distinguées. D’une part, une qualification méthodologique qui désigne les techniques de découvertes qui justifient et légitiment les connaissances et, d’autre part, ce que nous pouvons appeler une heuristique générale. Celle-ci constitue une partie de l’épistémologie, l’étude critique des sciences, [20] et a en charge de décrire et de réfléchir aux conditions générales du progrès de l’activité scientifique [21].

Nous sommes évidemment toutes et tous familiers avec les questions de méthode, ce chemin que l’on emprunte, que l’on entreprend, et qui a vocation à nous conduire et à nous permettre d’atteindre un but donné, de capitaliser un résultat. C’est ce parcours qui, comme scientifiques, comme intellectuels, nous fait vivre l’expérience, que nous appelons expérimentation lorsque nous la provoquons de manière systématique. La recherche scientifique se fonde sur une volonté de cheminer sur ce sentier en combinant de manière interactive l’observation aidée de l’expérimentation et l’analyse du système, permettant l’explication. L’adaptation des pensées aux faits constitue l’observation ; l’adaptation des pensées entre elles, la théorie [22].

En ce sens, la recherche contemporaine nous adresse deux messages. D’une part, celui de la rigueur, d’autre part celui de la relativité, et donc de la modestie. Elles sont à mon sens aussi nécessaires et importantes l’une que l’autre.

 

3.1. Le premier message : celui de la rigueur et de la critique

La rigueur consiste d’abord à savoir de quoi on parle, quel est le problème, ce que l’on cherche. C’est le premier but raisonnable de l’heuristique : formuler en termes généraux des raisons pour choisir des sujets dont l’examen pourra nous aider à parvenir à la solution [23].  On suit bien entendu les traces des mathématiciens, physiciens, logiciens, philosophes, etc. : Pappos d’Alexandrie (IVe s. PNC), René Descartes (1596-1650), Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz (1646-1716), Bernhard Bolzano (1781-1848), Ernst Mach ((1838-1916), Jacques Hadamard (1865-1963), George Polya (1887-1985), Jean Hamburger (1909-1992), Morris Kline (1908-1992), etc. Et plus récemment Daniel Kahneman et Shane Frederick. Dans chacune de nos disciplines, nous avons pu en fréquenter l’un ou l’autre, sinon tous. Un mathématicien comme Polya, qui a enseigné à Zurich puis à Stanford, auteur de How to Solve it ? [24], défend l’idée que les sources des inventions sont plus importantes que les inventions elles-mêmes. Cela devrait constituer, affirme-t-il, la devise de toute étudiante ou de tout étudiant qui se prépare à une carrière scientifique. Les démonstrations non motivées, les lemmes qui arrivent on ne sait d’où, les lignes auxiliaires qui tombent du ciel sont abracadabrants et déprimants pour tous les élèves, bons ou médiocres [25]. Pour m’être fait démonter un jour à un examen oral sur le théorème de Bernoulli, je peux en témoigner personnellement…

Ainsi, il existe dans le monde certaines traditions de construction d’un discours critique et intellectuellement robuste, qui n’est d’ailleurs pas européo-centré et ne date pas, contrairement à ce qu’on nous enseigne trop souvent, de la Renaissance ou des Lumières. Enseignant à l’École nationale d’Ingénieurs de Tunis, je découvre chaque jour davantage ce que nous devons – et ce « nous » comprend des chercheurs comme Arnold J. Toynbee ou Joseph Schumpeter – à un savant arabe comme Ibn Khaldoun (1332-1406). Dans son introduction à son œuvre majeure, Muqaddima, le Livre des Exemples, cet économiste, sociologue et historien du XIVe siècle conseillait de procéder à une confrontation entre les récits tels qu’ils lui ont été transmis et les règles et modèles ainsi constitués. En cas d’accord et de conformité, ces récits peuvent être déclarés authentiques, sinon, ils seront tenus pour suspects et écartés [26].

Cet effort heuristique concret a été initié par l’humaniste italien Lorenzo Valla (1407-1457) dont le rôle a été, selon François Dosse, décisif dans la notion de vérité, au point que l’historien et épistémologue de l’Université de Paris a parlé d’un véritable tournant [27]. Valla a remis en question l’authenticité de la Donation de Constantin écrite en 1440. Ce texte, reconnaissant à l’empereur romain Constantin le Grand (272-337) l’octroi d’un vaste territoire et d’un pouvoir spirituel et temporel sur le pape Sylvestre I (règne 314-335), a eu une grande influence sur la politique et les affaires religieuses dans l’Europe médiévale. Lorenzo Valla a clairement démontré que ce document était un faux en analysant la langue de la donation. Il montra que le latin utilisé dans le texte n’était pas celui du IVe siècle et affirma ainsi que le document ne pouvait pas dater de l’époque de Constantin [28].

La méthode critique va trouver ses gardiens du Temple en Charles-Victor Langlois (1863-1929) et Charles Seignobos (1854-1942), qui vont constituer le rempart contre ce qu’ils considéraient comme la pente naturelle de l’esprit humain : ne prendre aucune précaution, procéder confusément là où la plus grande attention est indispensable. Là où, écrivaient-ils, tout le monde admet en principe l’utilité de la Critique – avec une majuscule ! -, celle-ci ne passe guère dans la pratique.

C’est que la Critique est contraire à l’allure normale de l’Intelligence. La tendance spontanée de l’homme est d’ajouter foi aux affirmations et de les reproduire, sans même les distinguer nettement de ses propres observations. Dans la vie de tous les jours, n’acceptons-nous pas indifféremment, sans vérification d’aucune sorte des on-dit, des renseignements anonymes et sans garantie, toutes sortes de « documents » de médiocre ou de mauvais aloi ? (…) Tout homme sincère reconnaîtra qu’un violent effort est nécessaire pour secouer l’ignavia critica, cette formule si répandue de la lâcheté intellectuelle ; que cet effort doit être répété, et qu’il s’accompagne souvent d’une véritable souffrance [29].

Souffrance, le mot est lâché… Tout comme pour la beauté, il faut souffrir pour être chercheur. C’est une torture notamment inspirée des travaux de l’historien allemand Leopold von Ranke (1795-1886). Pour atteindre le paradis de la scientificité, elle soumet le document, mais aussi l’étudiant et le professeur à une série d’opérations analytiques composées de la critique interne ou critique d’érudition (restitution, provenance, classement des sources, critique des érudits), puis à la critique interne (interprétation, interne négative, de sincérité et d’exactitude, détermination des faits particuliers) et, enfin, les valorise dans des opérations synthétiques…

En 1961, dans l’ouvrage extraordinaire que constitue L’histoire et ses méthodes, publié sous la direction de Charles Samaran (1879-1982) de l’Institut de France, Robert Marichal (1904-1999) reprenait ce plan de Langlois et Seignobos, en considérant que la critique des textes n’a guère été remise en cause par les tenants de la « Nouvelle Histoire » qui, selon cet archiviste réputé, considèrent que les procédés traditionnels ont gardé leur efficacité. Marichal ajoutait d’ailleurs que les principes dont relève la critique ne diffèrent pas, dans ce qu’ils ont de général, de ceux de toute connaissance humaine, tels qu’on les trouve dans tout traité de logique ou de psychologie [30].

Cinquante ans plus tard, Gérard Noirel, un des spécialistes de l’épistémologie en histoire, rappelle dans l’édition en ligne de l’ouvrage de Langlois et Seignobos, que ceux-ci n’ont pas inventé les règles de la méthode historique, les principes de base étant connus depuis le XVIIe siècle et avaient été codifiés par les historiens allemands au début du XIXe siècle. Le grand mérite de ces deux professeurs à la Sorbonne est certainement, souligne Noiriel, d’avoir écrit qu’il fallait lire les historiens avec les mêmes précautions critiques que lorsqu’on analyse des documents [31].

Les sciences humaines ont été très influencées par le chemin scientiste qu’a emprunté l’histoire à la fin du XIXe siècle.  Comme cette discipline, elles ont ensuite pris quelque distance avec ce préjugé scientiste fondé sur la critique absolue des documents. Dans une introduction intitulée en 2008, L’approximative rigueur de l’anthropologie, Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan montrait en fait que le mot n’était qu’un paradoxe apparent ; il met en évidence la fatalité de l’approximation face à la vulnérabilité des biais cognitifs et des dérives idéologiques, mais il renonce à tout abandon à cette quête dans un livre d’ailleurs intitulé La Rigueur du qualitatif [32]. Le professeur à l’École des Hautes Études en Sciences sociales à Paris, mobilise d’ailleurs également son collègue américain Howard Becker, qui, dans Sociological Work: Method and Substance  (Chicago, Adline, 1970) et  Writing for Social Scientists (University of Chicago Press, 1986 & 2007), avait mis en évidence cette tension entre la cohérence de ce que l’on raconte et la conformité aux éléments découverts [33].

Le paradigme scientiste a fait place à d’autres paradigmes, qui ont d’ailleurs marqué l’ensemble des sciences humaines. C’est le cas de l’École des Annales, dont les cahiers, appuyés par le Centre de Recherches historiques de l’École pratique des Hautes Études à Paris, ont pu faire éclairer ces questions de critique historique par un brillant professeur liégeois comme Léon-E. Halkin (1906-1998).

Si elle restait une exigence méthodologique, la méthode critique stricte – au sens du culte idolâtre du document [34] –  a paru s’assouplir au tournant des années 1980. Comme l’avait déjà fait Charles Samaran en 1961, il s’agit désormais de mettre davantage en avant des principes généraux de la méthode [35], voire la déontologie de l’historien. Sur ce plan, et à la suite du directeur éditorial de l’Histoire et ses méthodes, Guy Thuillier (1932-2019) et Jean Tulard appellent à la rescousse le grand Cicéron : la première loi qui s’impose (à lui) est de ne rien oser dire qu’il sache faux, la seconde d’oser dire tout ce qu’il croit vrai [36].

Ainsi, poursuivent-ils, l’honnêteté d’esprit implique le sens critique [37]. Les autres préceptes des auteurs de La méthode en histoire sont ceux que je livre à mes étudiantes et étudiants en rappelant que ces conseils s’appliquent à toutes leurs tâches dans toutes les disciplines, comme dans la vie quotidienne :

  • On ne doit rien affirmer sans qu’il y ait un « document » que l’on ait vérifié personnellement.
  • On doit toujours indiquer le degré de « probabilité » – ou d’incertitude – du document. Il ne faut pas se fier aux apparences, et faire confiance aveuglément aux textes (…)
  • Il faut toujours marquer explicitement les hypothèses qui guident la recherche, et souligner les limites de l’enquête (…)
  • Il faut garder une certaine distance au sujet traité et ne pas confondre, par exemple, biographie et hagiographie (…)
  • On doit se méfier des généralisations hâtives (…)
  • Il faut savoir que rien n’est définitif (…)
  • Il faut savoir bien user de son temps, ne pas trop se presser (…),
  • Il est nécessaire de ne pas s’enfermer dans son cabinet (…). L’expérience de la vie est indispensable (…) [38]

 

 3.2. Le deuxième message est celui de la relativité, et donc de la modestie

C’est une formule forte qui clôture le remarquable travail de Françoise Waquet, directrice de recherche au CNRS : la science, écrit-elle, est humaine – forcément, banalement, profondément [39]. Son enquête, dans les laboratoires, les bibliothèques, les bureaux, parmi les maîtres et les disciples, les livres et les ordinateurs, montre comment s’articulent, autour de l’objectivité, les règles de métier et la – ou les – passions académiques.

Waquet prend en compte les analyses de Lorraine Daston, co-directrice de l’Institut Max Planck d’histoire des Sciences à Berlin. Ces  travaux ont montré une propension à  aspirer à un savoir qui ne porte aucune trace de celui qui sait, un savoir qui ne soit pas marqué par le préjugé ou l’acquis, par l’imagination ou le jugement, par le désir ou l’effort. Dans ce régime d’objectivité, la passion apparait comme l’ennemie intérieure du chercheur [40].

Henri Pirenne l’avait parfaitement exprimé en 1923 lorsqu’il affirmait du chercheur que pour arriver à l’objectivité, à l’impartialité sans lequel il n’est pas de science, il lui faut donc comprimer en lui-même et surmonter ses préjugés les plus chers, ses convictions les plus assises, ses sentiments les plus naturels et les plus respectables [41]. Émile Durkheim ne dit d’ailleurs pas autre chose pour la sociologie, ni d’ailleurs Marcel Mauss pour l’anthropologie, Vidal de la Blache pour la géographie ou même Émile Borel pour les mathématiques. On pourrait, avec Françoise Waquet multiplier les exemples qui débouchent, même dans les sciences dites « dures »  sur une forme d’ascétisme et d’objectivité passionnée [42].

Dans la seconde moitié du vingtième siècle, les fulgurants progrès de la science au sortir de la Guerre mondiale, les interrogations nées de la critique de la modernité n’ont pas laissé les sciences indemnes. Ancien élève de l’École polytechnique, le jésuite François Russo (1909-1998), notait en 1959 que la science tend à poser des problèmes qui se situent au-delà du domaine de la stricte méthode scientifique. Il citait les spéculations d’Albert Einstein (1879-1955), de Georges Lemaître (1894-1966) ou d’autres analyses sur l’univers comme totalité, sur les considérations sur la dégradation de l’énergie dans l’univers, l’évolution biologique, l’origine de la vie, de l’être humain, leur nature, etc., soulignant que les progrès de la science font rebondir ces questions sans les faire disparaître. Ainsi, posait-il aussi, et parallèlement, la question du sens [43].

Faut-il dire que les débats sur ces enjeux se sont développés, de Raymond Aron (1905-1983) à Paul Ricœur (1913-2005), de Karl Polanyi (1886-1964) à Thomas Kuhn (1922-1996), de Karl Popper (1902-1994) à Richard Rorty (1931-2007) et Anthony Giddens, etc. ?

Sur la question de l’objectivité, c’est un des professeurs dont les cours m’ont personnellement le plus marqué, qui, face à la passion, montre le chemin de la lucidité. Dans L’histoire continue, Georges Duby (1919-1996) considère que c’est la stricte morale positiviste qui donne au métier du chercheur sa dignité. En effet, poursuit le médiéviste, l’histoire renonce à la quête illusoire de l’objectivité totale, c’est non par l’effet du flux d’irrationalité qui envahit notre culture, mais c’est surtout parce que la notion de vérité en histoire s’est modifiée. Ainsi, son objet s’est déplacé : elle s’intéresse désormais moins à des faits qu’à des relations…. [44]

 

Conclusion : sentiment, raison et expérience

Revenons à François Guizot, d’où nous sommes partis. Mais cette fois-ci pour conclure.

Dans ce moment Guizot, comme l’a appelé Pierre Rosanvallon, véritable âge d’or de la science politique [45], la leçon était claire : comment, dans la proximité et sous la pression des bouleversements majeurs que cette période connut – Révolution française, Révolution industrielle machiniste, y compris leurs transformations structurelles et systémiques dans les domaines technologiques, politiques, sociaux, culturels, etc., – comment appréhender les événements sous la souveraineté de la raison ?

Même si la plupart des êtres humains ont ressenti, chacun dans leur temps, l’avènement du monde [46], son accroissement, ses accélérations, ses émergences, ses instabilités, notre société semble davantage marquée qu’hier par le flot des informations en tous genres qui nous atteignent, nous interpellent, nous assaillent. Emportés nous-mêmes à grande vitesse sur ce qu’on qualifiait voici quelques décennies déjà, d’autoroutes de l’information, nous apprenons à piloter notre esprit à des vitesses jusqu’ici inconnues, boostés que nous sommes par nos outils numériques. C’est peu de dire en effet que ce sont désormais les microprocesseurs qui rythment nos travaux. Après être passés, lors du confinement, de Teams en Zoom, de Jitsi en Webex ou Google Meet – et en avoir souvent conservé l’habitude, nous savons toutes et tous, que le numérique bat désormais la cadence. Dans les flux de messages, de liens, de SMS qui nous sont adressés, nous nous éduquons tant bien que mal à identifier les pièges des pirates et autres nuisibles numériques. Au-delà de nos outils défensifs, c’est l’expérience qui souvent nous guide.

Nous avons peu de firewalls pour nous défendre contre les démons de l’apocalypse cognitive que nous décrit ou nous promet Gérald Bronner. Nous ne voulons pas de censure du « bien penser » ou de monde javellisé où l’on filtrerait nos connexions et où on passerait nos cerveaux au gel hydro-alcoolique. La meilleure régulation reste à mes yeux celle de notre propre intelligence, pour autant qu’elle reste fondée sur la raison et sur la rigueur du raisonnement.

Celle-ci passe assurément par l’heuristique et les méthodes de la recherche. Dans un discours qu’il prononçait en septembre 1964 à l’occasion de la rentrée solennelle de la Faculté polytechnique de Mons, le professeur et futur recteur Jacques Franeau (+2007) notait qu’il fallait éviter de confondre objectif et subjectif, que, puisque toute société a pour but essentiel de réaliser un cadre qui convienne le mieux à la vie et au bonheur des êtres humains, elle doit, pour y arriver, partir de données sûres et objectives, elle doit connaître avant de choisir son orientation et, ensuite, elle doit construire sur les bases solides que lui donne cette connaissance [47].

Ainsi, avons-nous mis, pour répondre aux inquiétudes, deux réponses en exergue : la rigueur et la critique, d’une part, la relativité et la modestie de l’autre.

Sans tomber dans l’idée de Voltaire selon lequel toute certitude qui n’est pas démonstration mathématique n’est qu’une extrême probabilité [48], l’éducation de ceux qui fréquentent l’enseignement supérieur doit fonder l’exigence tant de la robustesse que de la traçabilité raisonnable de toute information produite. Citer une source, ce n’est pas, quelle que soit la discipline, renvoyer à l’œuvre globale d’un savant, ni même à une de ses productions – numérique ou papier – sans préciser la localisation de l’information. Certains collègues ou étudiants vous renvoient à un livre de 600 pages, sans autre précision, ni d’édition ni de pagination. Vérification impossible. De même, pour reprendre un constat fait jadis tant par le mathématicien et économiste germano-américain Oskar Morgenstern (1902-1977) [49] que par le Français Gilles-Gaston Granger (1920-2016) [50], la question de la validité, de la fiabilité des données ne semble guère intéresser de nombreux chercheurs. Chez ces deux éminents spécialistes de l’épistémologie comparative, c’étaient les économistes qui étaient visés. Mais, n’en doutons pas, beaucoup d’autres chercheurs sont atteints… Je suis certain que ces témoignages résonnent en vous comme ils le font en moi. Former nos étudiants à la rigueur, à la précision et à la critique, c’est assurément contribuer à en faire, au-delà de chercheurs de qualités, des intellectuels conscients, à l’esprit courageux, c’est-à-dire apte à se saisir des contenus les plus difficiles ou les plus farfelus, s’en délivrer, et ne communiquer que sur l’exact et le certain.

La relativité et la modestie sont filles de la conscience de nos faiblesses face au monde et de la difficulté de se saisir du système dans sa totalité. Elles se nourrissent aussi de l’idée, légitime, que les explications des phénomènes ainsi que leur vérité, changent avec les progrès des sciences. On ne saurait nier, rappelle Granger, qu’une vérité newtonienne concernant la trajectoire d’un astre diffère de la vérité einsteinienne se rapportant au même objet [51]. Sans verser dans un scepticisme à l’égard de la connaissance scientifique, il s’agit plutôt de se regarder en face, nous êtres humains, et de prendre conscience de la richesse que constitue notre capacité à articuler sentiment, raison et expérience. À l’heure où les rêves de la cybernétique se transforment en réalités de l’IA générale, nous avons de plus en plus besoin de références humaines et scientifiques pour nous montrer le chemin.

Ainsi, et pour aller vers la fin de cet exposé, je solliciterai l’auteur de La Science expérimentale, Claude Bernard (1813-1878). Dans son discours de réception à l’Académie française, le 27 mai 1869, le grand médecin et physiologiste observait que, dans le développement progressif de l’humanité, la poésie, la philosophie et les sciences expriment les trois phases de notre intelligence, passant successivement par le sentiment, la raison et l’expérience [52].

Néanmoins, souligne Claude Bernard, ce serait une erreur de croire que si on suit les préceptes de la méthode expérimentale, le chercheur – et je dirais l’intellectuel – doive repousser toute conception a priori et faire taire son sentiment pour ne se fonder que sur les résultats de l’expérience. En effet, dit le physiologiste français, les lois qui règlent les manifestations de l’intelligence humaine ne lui permettent pas de procéder autrement qu’en passant toujours et successivement par le sentiment, la raison et l’expérience. Mais, convaincu de l’inutilité de l’esprit réduit à lui-même, il donne à l’expérience (expérimentation) une influence prépondérante et il cherche à se prémunir contre l’impatience de connaître qui nous pousse sans cesse dans l’erreur. C’est donc avec calme et sans précipitation que nous devons marcher à la recherche de la vérité, en s’appuyant sur la raison ou le raisonnement qui nous sert toujours de guide, mais, à chaque moment, nous devons le tempérer et le dompter par l’expérience, sachant que, à notre insu, le sentiment nous fait retourner à l’origine des choses [53].

Si, aujourd’hui, en 2021, les conceptions démocratiques européennes ont fondamentalement évolué depuis Guizot, notamment à la faveur des progrès de l’éducation et en particulier de l’enseignement supérieur, l’heuristique comme outil de découverte des faits reste une préoccupation sensible des chercheur-e-s de toutes les disciplines, mais aussi des citoyennes et citoyens dans un monde numérique. Comme celles réunies dans le réseau EUNICE, les universités européennes, par leur parcours, mais aussi et surtout par leur ambition, constituent sans aucun doute l’une des meilleures réponses à ces préoccupations réelles.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

 

[1] Laurent THEIS, Guizot, La traversée d’un siècle, Paris, CNRS Editions, 2014. – Edition Kindle, Location 1104.

[2] René HOVEN, Jacques STIENNON, Pierre-Marie GASON, Jean Chapeaville (1551-1617) et ses amis. Contribution à l’historiographie liégeoise, Bruxelles, Académie royale de Belgique, 2004 – Paul DELFORGE, Jean Chapeaville (1551-1617), Connaître la Wallonie, Namur,  Décembre 2014. http://connaitrelawallonie.wallonie.be/fr/wallons-marquants/dictionnaire/chapeaville-jean#.YWrVvhpBzmE qui avait fasciné, à l’époque, le Professeur Jacques Stiennon.

[3] L. THEIS, op. cit., Location 1149-1150.

[4] Guillaume de BERTHIER DE SAUVIGNY,  François Guizot (1787-1874), dans Encyclopædia Universalis consulté le 13 octobre 2021.https://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/francois-guizot/ – Pierre ROSANVALLON, Le moment Guizot, coll. Bibliothèque des Sciences humaines, Paris, NRF-Gallimard, 1985. – André JARDIN et André-Jean TUDESQ, La France des Notables, L’évolution générale, 1815-1848,  Nouvelle Histoire de la France contemporaine, Paris, Seuil, 1988.

[5] François GUIZOT, Histoire des origines du gouvernement représentatif en Europe, p. 2, Paris, Didier, 1851. – (…) and man thus learns that in the infinititude of space opened to his knowledge, everything remains constaintly fresh and inexhaustible, in regard to his ever-active and ever-limited intelligence. GUIZOT, History of the Origin of the Representative Government in Europe, p. 2,

[6] Ibidem, p. 5 (EN, p. 3).

[7] Ibidem, p. 6.

[8] Voir sur ces questions le toujours très riche Jean PIAGET dir., Logique et connaissance scientifique, coll. Encyclopédie de la Pléiade, Paris, Gallimard, 1967. En particulier, J. PIAGET, L’épistémologie et ses variéts, p. 3sv. – Hervé BARREAU, L’épistémologie, Paris, PuF, 2013.

[9] Gérald BRONNER, Apocalypse cognitive, Paris, PUF-Humensi, 2021.

[10] G. BRONNER, Apocalypse…, p. 220-221.

[11] Raymond ARON, La philosophie critique de l’histoire, Essai sur une théorie allemande de l’histoire (1938), Paris, Vrin, 3e éd., 1964.

[12] Raymond ARON, Communication devant la Société française de philosophie, 17 juin 1939, dans R. ARON, Croire en la démocratie, 1933-1944, Textes édités et présentés par Vincent Duclert, p. 102, Paris, Arthème-Fayard – Pluriel, 2017. – Jean BIRNBAUM, Le courage de la nuance, p. 73, Paris, Seuil, 2021.

[13] Alexis de TOCQUEVILLE, La Démocratie en Amérique, dans Œuvres, collection La Pléiade, t. 2, p. 185, Paris, Gallimard, 1992. – G. BRONNER, op. cit., p. 221.

[14] G. BRONNER, op. cit., p. 238 et 298

[15] Valérie IGOUNET, Derrière le Front, Histoires, analyses et décodage du Front national, 26 octobre 2015.

https://blog.francetvinfo.fr/derriere-le-front/2015/10/26/les-francais-dabord.html

[16] Heather STEWART & Rowen MASON, Nigel Farage’s anti-migrant poster reported to police, in The Guardian, June 16, 2016. https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/16/nigel-farage-defends-ukip-breaking-point-poster-queue-of-migrants

[17] D. KAHNEMAN, Thinking, Fast and Slow, New York, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2011. – Trad. Système 1/ Système 2, Les deux vitesses de la pensée, Paris, Flammarion, 2012. – See also: D. KAHNEMAN et al., dir., Judgment under Uncertainty,: Heuristics and Biases, Cambridge University Press, 1982.

[18] Daniel KAHNEMAN, Olivier SIBONY and Cass R. SUNSTEIN, Noise, A flaw in Human Judgment, p. 166-167, New York – Boston – London, Little Brown Spark, 2021. – Trad. Noise, Pourquoi nous faisons des erreurs de jugement et comment les éviter, Paris, Odile Jacob, 2021.

[19] Ibidem, p. 168. – Paul SLOVIC, Psychological Study of Human Judgment: Implications for Investment Decision Making, in Journal of Finance, 27, 1972, p. 779.

[20] Au sens le plus large du concept, tant latin qu’anglo-saxon. Voir Gilles Gaston GRANGER, Epistémologie, dans Encyclopædia Universalis, consulté le 10 octobre 2021. https://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/epistemologie/

[21] Jean-Pierre CHRÉTIEN-GONI, Heuristique, dans Encyclopædia Universalis, consulté le 10 octobre 2021. https://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/heuristique/

[22] Jean LARGEAULT, Méthode, dans Encyclopædia Universalis, consulté le 10 octobre 2021. https://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/methode/

[23] George POLYA, L’Heuristique est-elle un sujet d’étude raisonnable ?, dans Travail et Méthodes, Numéro Hors Série La Méthode dans les Sciences modernes, Paris, Sciences et Industrie, 1958.

[24] G. POLYA, How to Solve it ?, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1945.

[25] G. POLYA, L’Heuristique est-elle un sujet d’étude raisonnable…, p. 284.

[26] Ibn KHALDUN, Le Livre des exemples, Autobiographie, Muqaddima, texte traduit et annoté par Abdesselam Cheddadi, collection Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, t. 1, p. 39, Paris, NRF-Gallimard, 2202. – Abdesselam CHEDDADI, Ibn Khaldûn, L’homme et le théoricien de la civilisation, p. 194, Paris, NRF-Gallimard, 2006.

[27] François DOSSE, L’histoire, p. 18-20, Paris, A. Colin, 2° éd., 2010. – Blandine BARRET-KRIEGEL, L’histoire à l’âge classique, vol. 2, p. 34, Paris, PUF, 1988.

[28] Ulick Peter BURKE, Lorenzo Valla, in Encyclopaedia Britannica, viewed on October 19, 2021 https://www.britannica.com/biography/Lorenzo-Valla- Donation of Constantin, in Encyclopaedia Britannica, viewed on October 19, 2021. https://www.britannica.com/topic/Donation-of-Constantine

[29] Charles-Victor LANGLOIS et Charles SEIGNOBOS, Introduction aux études historiques, p. 48-49, Paris, Hachette & Cie, 1898. 4 éd., s.d. (1909).

[30] Robert MARICHAL, La critique des textes, dans Charles SAMARAN dir., L’histoire et ses méthodes, coll. Encyclopédie de la Pléiade,  p. 1248, Paris, NRF-gallimard, 1961.

[31] Gérard NOIREL, Préface de Charles-Victor LANGLOIS et Charles SEIGNOBOS, Introduction aux études historiques, Paris, ENS, 2014. https://books.openedition.org/enseditions/2042#ftn8

[32] Jean-Pierre OLIVIER de SARDAN, La rigueur du qualitatif, Les contraintes empiriques de l’interprétation socio-anthropologique, p. 7-10, Louvain-la-Neuve, Bruylant-Academia, 2008.

[33] Howard S. BECKER, Les ficelles du métier, Comment conduire sa recherche en Sciences sociales, p. 48, Paris, La Découverte, 2002. – J-P OLIVIER de SARDAN, op. cit., p. 8.

[34] F. DOSSE, L’histoire…, p. 29. On vise ici Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges (1830-1889). Voir François HARTOG, Le XIXe siècle et l’histoire, Le cas Fustel de Coulanges, p. 351-352, Paris, PUF, 1988.

[35] Ch. SAMARAN, L’histoire et ses méthodes…, p. XII-XIII.

[36] On ne peut toutefois que s’étonner que, aucun des quatre historiens n’indique la référence de cette citation…  Il s’agit en fait de CICERON, De orate, 2, 62-63. Nam qui nescit primam esse historiae legem, ne quid falsi dicere audeat ? deinde ne quid ueri non audeat ? ne quae suspicio gratiae sit in scribendo ? ne quae simultatis ? Haec scilicet fundamenta nota sunt omnibus.  Qui ne sait que la première loi du genre est de ne rien oser dire de faux ? la seconde, d’oser dire tout ce qui est vrai ? D’éviter, en écrivant, jusqu’au moindre soupçon de faveur ou de haine ? Oui, voilà les fondements de l’histoire, et il n’est personne qui les ignore. Autre traduction : en effet, qui ignore que la première loi de l’histoire est de n’oser rien dire de faux ? Enfin, de n’oser rien dire qui ne soit vrai ? Qu’il n’y ait pas le moindre soupçon de complaisance en écrivant ? pas la moindre haine ? Tels sont bien entendu les fondements que tout le monde a connus. Merci à mon collègue historien Paul Delforge d’avoir retrouvé cette source.

[37] Ibidem, p. XIII. – Jean TULARD (1933) et Guy THUILLIER (1932-2019), La méthode en histoire, p. 91, Paris, PUF, 1986.

[38] J. TULARD (1933) et .G. THUILLIER, La méthode en histoire…, p. 92-94.

[39] François WAQUET, Une histoire émotionnelle du savoir, XVIIe-XXIe siècle, p. 325 , Paris, CNRS Editions, 2019.

[40] Lorraine DASTON, The moral Economy of Science, in Osiris, 10, 1995, p. 18-23. – F. WAQUET, op. cit., p. 393,

[41] Henri PIRENNE, De la méthode comparative en histoire, Discours prononcé à la séance d’ouverture du Ve Congrès international des Sciences historiques, 9 avril 1923, Bruxelles, Weissenbruch, 1923. – F. WAQUET, op. cit., p. 306.

[42] F. PAQUET, op. cit., p. 303. – Paul WHITE, Darwin’s emotions, The Scientific self and the sentiment of objectivity, in Isis, 100, 2009, p. 825.

[43] François RUSSO, Valeur et situation de la méthode scientifique, dans La méthode dans les sciences modernes…, p. 341. Voir aussi : F. RUSSO, Nature et méthode de l’histoire des sciences, Paris, Blanchard, 1984.

[44] Georges DUBY, L’histoire continue, p. 72-78, Paris, Odile Jacob, 1991.

[45] Pierre ROSANVALLON, Le moment Guizot, coll. Bibliothèque des sciences humaines, p. 75 et 87, Paris, NRF-Gallimard, 1985.

[46] Michel LUSSAULT, L’avènement du monde, Essai sur l’habitation humaine de la Terre, Paris, Seuil, 2013.

[47] Jacques FRANEAU, D’où vient et où va la science ? Discours solennel de rentrée de la Faculté polytechnique de Mons, 26 septmbre 1964, p. 58.

[48] René POMMEAU, Préface, dans VOLTAIRE, Œuvres historiques,  p. 14, Paris, NRF-Gallimard, 1957.

[49] Oskar MORGENSTERN, On the accuracy of Economic Observation, Princeton, 1950.

[50] Gilles-Gaston GRANGER, La vérification, p. 191, Paris, Odile Jacob, 1992.

[51] Ibidem, p. 10.

[52] Claude BERNARD, Discours de réception à l’Académie française, 27 mai 1869, dans Claude BERNARD, La Science expérimentale,  p. 405-406, Paris, Baillière & Fils, 3e éd., 1890.

[53] Ibidem, p. 439-440.

Mons, 21 October 2021 [1]

Abstract

In his History of the Origin of Representative Government in Europe, a series of lectures given two centuries ago, from the end of 1820 to 1822, but published thirty years later, François Guizot (1787-1874) criticised partial opinions conceived before examining the facts. Guizot, a professor at the Sorbonne and future Minister of Education under Louis-Philippe, believed that this attitude distorted the rectitude of judgments and introduced a deplorable frivolity into research. He thought that erudition would suffer as a result of inadequate investigation and cursory judgments. Although, in 2021, European democratic concepts have evolved fundamentally since Guizot’s time, particularly in favour of educational progress and especially higher education, heuristics as a tool for discovering facts remains a serious concern for researchers in all disciplines, and also for citizens in a digital world. European universities, through their process, and above all through their ambition, are arguably one of the best responses to these genuine concerns.

 

A Professor of history at the Sorbonne in Paris in 1812 and then a senior civil servant under the Restoration, François Guizot alarmed the authorities with his liberal ideas and was suspended from teaching from 1822 to 1824. It was during this period that he wrote his major historical works, entitled History of the English Revolution, General History of Civilisation in Europe, and Histoire de la civilisation en France, works which brought him recognition as one of the finest historians of his time [2]. With his scientific mindset, he was one of the first historians – notably after the Liège scholar of the 16th century, Jean Chapeaville (1551-1617) [3] – to use the footnote, in other words, a reference to sources, and to develop an apparatus criticus, using primary sources [4]. After being elected deputy at the beginning of 1830, Guizot became Minister of the Interior in the government that arose out of the July Revolution, which resulted in Louis-Philippe becoming king of the French. As Minister of Public Education from 1832 to 1837, then of Foreign Affairs, he played a key political role, even serving as President of the Council. Conservative by nature and opposed to universal suffrage, he fell from power, along with the king, during the Revolution of 1848 and devoted himself to writing until the end of his life [5].

1. Questions concerning the relationship between a subject and an object

In 1820, while his political friends were excluded from the business of government and he was teaching in Paris, his audiences compiled their notes with a view to publishing his lectures on The History of the Origins of the Representative Government in Europe. Guizot did not perform the necessary revision work until much later, as his lectures were not published until 1851, and then shortly thereafter in London, in English, the following year. During the opening discourse of his lecture of 7 December 1820, which is reproduced in the work, Guizot starts by addressing the relativity of historical facts, which, if they have not gained or lost any of their content over the time they have spanned, will reveal their meaning only gradually, and analysing their significance will reveal new dimensions: and man thus learns, he writes, that in the infinitude of space opened to his knowledge, everything remains constantly fresh and inexhaustible, in regard to his ever-active and ever-limited intelligence [6]. The problem which Professor Guizot imparts to his students lies at the very heart of the objective he has set for his lecture: to describe the history of the public institutions in Europe based on reading about the particular moment of the new political order that had emerged in 1815. For Guizot, this means we have to reconnect what we now are with what we formerly were, and even – and he expresses it so beautifully –, gather together the links in that chain of time.

The problem, observes Guizot, is that studying the old institutions using modern ideas and institutions to explain or judge them has been largely neglected. And when it has happened, he says, it has been approached with such a strong preoccupation of mind, or with such a determined purpose, that the fruits of our labour have been damaged at the outset.

 Opinions which are partial and adopted before facts have been fairly examined, not only have the effect of vitiating the rectitude of judgment, but they moreover introduce a deplorable frivolity into researches which we may call material. As soon as the prejudiced mind has collected a few documents and proofs in support of its cherished notion, it is contented, and concludes its inquiry. On the one hand, it beholds in facts that which is not really contained in them; on the other hand, when it believes that the amount of information it already possesses will suffice, it does not seek further knowledge. Now, such has been the force of circumstances and passions among us, that they have disturbed even erudition itself. It has become a party weapon, an instrument of attack or defence; and facts themselves, inflexible and immutable facts, have been by turns invited or repulsed, perverted or mutilated, according to the interest or sentiment in favour of which they were summoned to appear [7].

Guizot’s analysis is still valid: the problem of discussing political issues that are relatively close in time but perceived as distant due to the scale of the changes that have occurred in the institutional conditions, changes which can be drastic in the case of a revolution or a profound regime change.

He highlights the danger facing teachers, researchers and « intellectuals » – I am aware that it is anachronistic for me to use this word in 1820 or even in 1850 –, the difficulty they have in speaking or writing neutrally, objectively and dispassionately, with the distance that is expected of the role or profession of the person expressing their opinion and getting close to the truth or even telling the truth. The issues surrounding analysis of sources, the ethics of the scientist, and logic as conditions of the truth, along with questions concerning the relationship between a subject and the object they are addressing [8] and historical criticism are at the heart of this self-reflection.

 

2. A Cognitive Apocalypse

In his lecture to his students, Guizot highlights the risk of being contented too quickly with a sparse collection of sources which appear to support a previously stated assumption without truly substantiating it. When faced with the ambitions and requirements of proof, scant data produces incorrect interpretation of documents. Passion and commitment based on a flimsy argument threaten quality of knowledge, while erudition becomes a partisan instrument. How often do we encounter this situation in a world in which, however, education – and particularly higher education – is becoming increasingly democratised?

Guizot, who, as a minister, had previously resurrected the Académie des Sciences morales et politiques (Academy of Moral and Political Sciences), would today find support for his views from another scientist, a member of the Académie des Technologies (National Academy of Technologies of France) and the Académie nationale française de Médecine (French Academy of Medicine). Just over two centuries after the declarations we have highlighted, Gérald Bronner, professor of sociology at the University of Paris, observes in his remarkable work Apocalypse cognitive (Cognitive Apocalypse) that the first twenty years of the 21st century have introduced massive deregulation in the marketplace for ideas. We note, as does Bronner, that this cognitive market is characterised both by the vast amount of information available, which is unprecedented in the history of humanity, and also by the fact that everyone is able to contribute their own representation of the world. Furthermore, Bronner believes that this evolution has weakened the role of the traditional gatekeepers, namely the academics, experts, journalists, and so on, all those who were previously regarded as rightfully able to participate in public debate and perform a beneficial regulatory role [9].

Bronner’s analyses display a degree of pessimism concerning our ability to cope with this situation. At least three reasons are cited: firstly, the famous Brandolini’s Law or Bullshit Asymmetry Principle. The Italian programmer Alberto Brandolini observed, in 2013, that the amount of energy needed to refute nonsense is far greater than that required to produce it [10]. Will we all be able to find the time, strength and courage to deal with waffle, simplistic analyses and even fake news? Many academics on social media have stopped doing so.

In his fine work on Le courage de la nuance (The courage of nuance), the essayist Jean Birnbaum wisely recalls the presentation made by Raymond Aron (1905-1983) at the Société française de Philosophie in June 1939. Faced with the increasing dangers, the great French intellectual called on his colleagues to assess their commitment: I think, said the author of Introduction à la philosophie de l’histoire [11], that teachers like us are likely to play a minor role in this effort to save our deeply held values. Instead of shouting with the parties, we could strive to define, in the utmost good faith, the problems facing us and the way to solve them [12].

Next, Bronner calls on a great mind of the mid-19th century: Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859). More resolutely democratic than his contemporary Guizot, Tocqueville writes, in his book Democracy in America (1835), that in general, only simple conceptions take hold of the minds of the people. A false idea, but one clear and precise, will always have more power in the world than a true, but complex, idea [13]. Some of you may still recall the excellent cartoon by Wiley Miller, published in The Intellectualist, in 2015, which shows a crowd of people approaching a ravine on a path marked Answers, simple but wrong » while one or two are making their way along a winding path, book in hand, having chosen the direction « Complex but right ».

Wiley Miller, The Intellectualist, 2015

Beyond the common meaning of the words, complex systems analysis, so dear to William Ross Ashby (1903-1972), Norbert Wiener (1894-1964), Herbert Simon (1916-2001), Ludwig von Bertalanffy (1901-1972), Jean Ladrière (1921-2007), Edgar Morin, Jean-Louis Le Moigne, Ilya Prigogine (1917-2003) and Isabelle Stengers, to name but a few, often remains outside the field of knowledge of our university chairs and, therefore, of our students.

Lastly, Bronner notes that our voracious brains do not automatically lead us to scientific models. Even where we have an appetite for knowledge, he adds, this can easily be distracted by the way in which the cognitive market is editorialised. This is the case, for example, with the confusion between correlation and causality, which is clearly illustrated by the Nazi slogan, “500,000 unemployed: 400,000 Jews” [14]. This device seems to crop up repeatedly. But there are other examples, and in all fields. For example, in 1978, the French fascist party, the Front national, stated: « A million unemployed people are a million immigrants too many. France and the French first. »[15] Another example is the poster that Nigel Farage unveiled in Westminster in mid-June 2016, one week before the BREXIT referendum on 23 June. The British broadcaster and Leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP) used a picture with the slogan Breaking point: the EU has failed us all, with the subheading: We must break free of the EU and take back control of our borders. The photograph used was of migrants crossing the Croatia-Slovenia border in 2015, with the only prominent white person in the photograph obscured by a box of text. Many people reacted by saying that to claim that migration to the UK is only about people who are not white is to peddle racism. That controversy prompted Boris Johnson to distance himself from Nigel Farage’s campaign [16].

The fact that we have found some particularly divisive, if not detestable, examples could weaken the idea that each of us, entirely logically, may simply demonstrate only what is prejudice. We often start the process of judgment with an inclination to reach a particular conclusion. In their book Noise: A Flaw of Human Judgment, Daniel Kahneman, Olivier Sibony and Cass R. Sinstein give a great example of a slant of thought they call conclusion bias, or prejudgment: when one of George Lucas’ collaborators in the development of the screenplay for Return of the Jedi, the third Star Wars film, suggested that he should kill off Luke and have Princess Leila take over, Lucas rejected the idea and disagreed with the different arguments, replying that « You don’t go around killing people » and, finally, that he didn’t like and didn’t believe that. As the authors observed, by « Not liking » before « Not believing », Lucas let his fast, intuitive System 1 thinking suggest a conclusion [17]. When we follow that process, we jump to the conclusion and simply bypass the process of gathering and integrating information, or we mobilise System 2 thinking – engaging a deliberative thought – to come up with arguments that support our prejudgment. In that case, adds Kahneman, a Nobel Prize winner for economics, and his colleagues, the evidence will be selective and distorted: because of confirmation bias and desirability bias, we will tend to collect and interpret evidence selectively to favour a judgment that, respectively, we already believe or wish to be true [18]. Prejudgments are evident wherever we look, conclude the three professors. When people determine what they think by consulting their feelings, the process involved is called the affect heuristic [19], a term coined by the psychologist Paul Slovic, Professor at the University of Oregon.

3. Heuristics as a form of resistance for enlightened minds

As is often the case, we can counter our reasons to despair with reasons to rejoice and hope. In my view, these lie in the power of heuristics, techniques and scientific method(s).

Heuristics is generally understood to mean all the intellectual products, processes and approaches that foster discovery and invention in science. There are two distinct aspects. Firstly, a methodological classification which denotes the discovery techniques that substantiate and legitimise knowledge and, secondly, what we can refer to as general heuristics. This forms part of epistemology, the critical study of science [20], and is responsible for describing and reflecting the general conditions for progress in scientific activity [21].

We are clearly all familiar with the questions of method, the path we follow or undertake, which is designed to lead us and to enable us to achieve a given goal and capitalise on a result. This is the path that provides us with our experience as scientists and intellectuals, which we call experimentation when we initiate it systematically. Scientific research is based on a desire to travel along this path, interactively combining assisted observation of experimentation and system analysis, thus enabling explanation. Adapting thoughts to facts is observation; adapting thoughts to each other is theory [22].

In that respect, contemporary research has two messages for us. Firstly, that of rigour and critique, and, secondly, that of relativity, and therefore humility. In my view, these are each as necessary and important as the other.

3.1. The first message: that of rigour and critique.

Rigour consists, firstly, in knowing what one is talking about, what the problem is, and what one is looking for. This is the first reasonable goal of heuristics: to express in general terms the reasons for choosing subjects which, when analysed, may help us achieve the solution [23]. We can, of course, follow in the footsteps of mathematicians, physicians, logicians, and philosophers, such as Pappus of Alexandria (4th century AD), René Descartes (1596-1650), Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz (1646-1716), Bernhard Bolzano (1781-1848), Ernst Mach ((1838-1916), Jacques Hadamard (1865-1963), George Polya (1887-1985), Jean Hamburger (1909-1992), Morris Kline (1908-1992), and, more recently, Daniel Kahneman and Shane Frederick. In each of our disciplines, we have visited one or more of them, if not all. A mathematician such as Polya, author of How to Solve it? [24], who taught in Zurich and then at Stanford, argues that the sources of inventions are more important than the inventions themselves. This should, he claims, be the motto of any student planning a career in science. Unsubstantiated demonstrations, lemmas that appear out of nowhere, and supplementary approaches that occur unexpectedly are puzzling and depressing for all students, both good and mediocre [25]. Having struggled through an oral exam on Bernouilli’s theory, I can personally testify.

There are, in the world, certain traditions for constructing a critical and intellectually robust discourse, one which is also not Eurocentric and does not, contrary to what we too often teach, date back to the Renaissance or the Enlightenment. As a Visiting Professor at the National Engineering School of Tunis, I am constantly discovering how much we owe – and the term “we” includes researchers such as Arnold J. Toynbee and Joseph Schumpeter – to the Arab scholar Ibn Khaldoun (1332-1406). In the introduction to his great work Muqaddima, this 14th century economist, sociologist and historian recommended making a comparison between the stories as handed down and the rules and models thus established. If they concur and are consistent, these stories can be declared authentic, if not, they will be considered suspect and discounted [26].

This tangible heuristic effort was pioneered by the Italian humanist Lorenzo Valla (1407-1457), whose role was, according to François Dosse, decisive in the notion of truth, to the extent that Dosse, a historian and epistemologist at the University of Paris, spoke of a real turning point [27]. Valla questioned the authenticity of the Donation of Constantine, written in 1440. This text, which acknowledged the fact that the Roman emperor Constantine the Great had bestowed vast territory and spiritual and temporal power on Pope Sylvester I (who reigned from 314 to 335), had great influence on political and religious affairs in medieval Europe. Lorenzo Valla clearly demonstrated that this document was a forgery by analysing the language of the donation. He showed that the Latin used in the text was not that of the 4th century and so argued that the document could not possibly have dated from the time of Constantine [28].

The critical method has found its guardians of the temple in Charles-V Langlois and Charles Seignobos, who established a bulwark against what they considered the natural inclination of the human spirit: not taking precautions and acting confusedly in situations where the utmost caution is essential. They wrote that while everyone, in principle, accepts the value of Criticism – with a capital C! – it hardly ever happens in practice.

The fact is that Criticism is contrary to the normal aspect of intelligence. The spontaneous human tendency is to add belief to assertions and to reproduce them, without even distinguishing them clearly from one’s own observations. In daily life, do we not accept indiscriminately, without any checks, hearsay, anonymous, unsafe information, and all types of documents of mediocre or dubious merit? (…) Any sincere person will recognise that significant effort is needed to shake off the ignavia critica, that common expression for intellectual cowardice; that this effort must be repeated, and that it is often accompanied by genuine suffering [29].

Suffering, the word is out … As with beauty, one needs to suffer to be a researcher. Research is a form of torture inspired, in part, by the works of the German historian Leopold von Ranke (1795-1886). To reach scientific paradise, the research process subjects the document, and the student and the teacher, to a series of analytical operations made up of internal criticism or scholarly criticism (restoration, provenance, classification of sources, criticism of scholars), then to internal criticism (interpretation, negative internal criticism, criticism of sincerity and accuracy, establishing the specific facts) and, lastly, optimises them in synthetic operations.

In 1961, in his extraordinary work entitled L’histoire et ses méthodes (History and its methods), published under the direction of Charles Samaran (1879-1982) from the Institut de France, Robert Marichal (1904-1999) picked up the notion put forward by Langlois and Seignobos, observing that documentary criticism had scarcely been challenged by the proponents of “New History”, which, according to this esteemed archivist, thought that the traditional processes were still effective. Marichal added that the principles that apply to criticism were no different, in general, to those that apply to all human knowledge, as can be found in any logic or psychology textbook [30].

Fifty years later, Gérard Noiriel, a specialist in epistemology in history, states in the online edition of the work by Langlois and Seignobos that they had not invented the rules of historical method, as the basic principles had been known since the 17th century and had been codified by German historians at the beginning of the 19th century. The major contribution of these two professors at the Sorbonne is arguably, states Noiriel, that they wrote that it was necessary to read the historians with the same critical precautions as when one analyses documents [31].

Human science has been greatly influenced by the scientific path taken by history at the end of the 19th century. But, like history, it has distanced itself from this strict criticism of documents. In an introduction, in 2008, entitled L’approximative rigueur de l’anthropologie (The approximate rigour of anthropology), Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, a professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences sociales (School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences) in Paris, showed that the word was nothing more than an apparent paradox, highlighting the inevitability of approximation faced with the vulnerability of cognitive bias and ideological excesses, and then abandoning this quest completely in a book entitled La Rigueur du qualitatif The Rigour of the Qualitative) [32]. De Sardan also enlisted his American colleague Howard Becker, who, in Sociological Work: Method and Substance (Chicago, Adline, 1970) and Writing for Social Scientists (University of Chicago Press, 1986 & 2007), had highlighted this tension between consistency of what is being described and conformity with the elements discovered [33].

The scientific paradigm has given way to other paradigms, which have also characterised all human sciences. This is the case with the famous École des Annales (School of Annals), whose books, by a brilliant professor from Liège, Léon-E. Halkin (1906-1998), and supported by the Centre de Recherches historiques at the École pratique des Hautes Études in Paris, have helped to clarify these issues surrounding historical criticism.

Although it remained a methodological requirement, the strict critical method – in the sense of the idolatrous cult of the document [34]  – seemed to become more relaxed at the beginning of the 1980s. At the same time, as Charles Samaran had already done in 1961, it was now a question of highlighting the general principles of the method [35], or even the ethics, of the historian. In that regard and taking their cue from the editorial director of l’Histoire et ses méthodes, Guy Thuillier (1932-2019) and Jean Tulard call on the mighty Cicero for help: the first law he must obey is to have the courage not to say what he knows to be false, the second is to have the courage to say what he believes to be true. Thus, they continue, sincerity of mind implies critical sense [36]. The other precepts of Thuillier and Tulard are those I offer to my students, pointing out that this advice applies to all their tasks in all disciplines, as in daily life:

  • Do not assert anything unless there is a “document” that you have verified personally.
  • Always indicate the document’s degree of “probability” – or uncertainty. Do not rely on appearances or have blind faith in texts (…)
  • Always explicitly highlight the assumptions that guide the research, and point out the limits of the investigation (…)
  • Maintain a certain distance from the subject in question and do not confuse, for instance, biography and hagiography (…)
  • Be wary of hasty generalisations (…)
  • Be aware that nothing is definitive (…)
  • Know how to use your time well; do not rush your work (…),
  • Do not shut yourself away in your office (…). Life experience is essential (…) [37]

3.2. The second message is that of relativity, and therefore of humility.

 The remarkable work done by Françoise Waquet, research director at the CNRS, ends with some powerful words: science, she writes, is human – inevitably, mundanely, profoundly so [38]. Her research, in laboratories, libraries and offices, among teachers and students, books and computers, shows how business rules and academic passion(s) are structured around objectivity. Waquet considers the analyses performed Lorraine Daston, co-director of the Max Planck Institute Berlin for the History of Science. These works showed a propensity to strive for a knowledge that bears no trace of the person who has the knowledge, a knowledge which is not characterised by bias or acquired concepts, by imagination or judgment, by desire or effort. In this system of objectivity, passion appears to be the internal enemy of the researcher [39].

Henri Pirenne expressed it perfectly, in 1923, when he claimed that, in order to achieve objectivity or impartiality without which there is no science, [researchers] must constrict themselves and overcome their cherished prejudices, their most deeply seated convictions, and their most natural and respectable sentiments [40]. Moreover, Émile Durkheim expressed the same view for sociology, as did Marcel Mauss for anthropology, Vidal de la Blache for geography and even Émile Borel for mathematics. We could, as Françoise Waquet did, list numerous examples that, even in the so called “hard” sciences, lead to a form of asceticism and ardent objectivity [41].

In the second half of the twentieth century, the dramatic advances in science after the end of the Second World War and the questions arising from criticism of modernity have not left science unscathed. The Jesuit François Russo (1909-1998), a former student at the École polytechnique, noted, in 1959, that science tends to pose problems that lie beyond the domain of the strict scientific method. He cited the theories of Albert Einstein (1879-1955) and Georges Lemaître (1894-1966), other analyses regarding the universe in its entirety, and considerations concerning the depletion of energy in the universe, biological evolution, the origins of life and of humans, human nature, etc., underlining that scientific advances cause these questions to reappear rather than disappear. In this way, and at the same, he posed questions of meaning [42].

Should it be said that the debates on these issues have evolved, from Raymond Aron (1905-1983) to Paul Ricœur (1913-2005), from Karl Polanyi (1886-1964) to Thomas Kuhn (1922-1996), from Karl Popper (1902-1994) to Richard Rorty (1931-2007) and Anthony Giddens, etc.?

On the question of objectivity, he was one of the professors whose classes had the greatest impact on me, who, when faced with passion, demonstrated the path of lucidity. In L’histoire continue (History is going on), the medievalist Georges Duby (1919-1996) considers that it is strict positivist ethics that gives the profession of researcher its dignity. If, he continues, history is abandoning the illusory quest for total objectivity, it is not on account of the stream of irrationality that is invading our culture, but it is above all because the notion of truth in history has changed. Its goal has moved: it is now interested less in facts and more in relationships… [43]

 

Conclusion: sentiment, reason and experience

Let us return to François Guizot, where we began, but this time in closing.

In that Guizot’s moment, as Pierre Rosanvallon called it, a veritable golden age of political science [44], the lesson was clear: how, at close quarters and under pressure from the major upheavals seen in that period – the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution, and the structural and systemic transformations they caused in the fields of technology, politics, society, culture, etc. –, how can we comprehend these events under the sovereignty of reason?

Even if most people have perceived, each in their own time, the advent of a new world [45], with its growth, acceleration, emerging trends and instabilities, our society appears to be characterised more so than yesterday by the flow of information of all kinds that reaches us, challenges us, and assails us. Carried along at great speed on what was already being called the information superhighway a few decades ago, we are learning to control our minds at hitherto unknown speeds, bolstered as we are by our digital tools. To put it mildly, it is now microprocessors that punctuate our work. During lockdown, having switched from Teams to Zoom, from Jitsi to Webex or Google Meet – and having often continued the habit, we all know that it is now the digital world that sets the pace. In the flow of messages, links and texts sent to us, we are learning how to identify the hackers and other digital pests. Beyond our defensive tools, it is experience that often guides us.

We have few firewalls to defend ourselves against the demons of the cognitive apocalypse described, or promised, by Gérald Bronner. We do not want any censorship of “good thinking” or a sterilised world in which we filter our connections and sanitise our brains. In my view, the best form of regulation remains our own intelligence.

This certainly involves heuristics and research methods. In a formal address he gave in September 1964 to mark start of the new term at the Faculté polytechnique de Mons, professor and future rector Jacques Franeau (+2007) noted that it was necessary to avoid confusing objective with subjective, and that, since the primary aim of any society was to create the best environment for human life and happiness, it was necessary, to achieve that goal, for it to start from certain and objective data, to have knowledge before choosing its direction, and then to build on the solid foundations afforded by that knowledge [46].

Thus, to address the concerns, we have highlighted two responses: firstly, rigour and criticism and, secondly, relativity and humility.

Without resorting to Voltaire’s idea that all certainty which is not mathematical demonstration is merely extreme probability [47], the teaching of those who frequent higher education must base stringency on both the robustness and the reasonable traceability of any information produced. Citing a source does not, whatever the discipline, mean referring to the overall work of a scholar, nor even to one of their creations – digital or paper – without specifying the location of the information. Some colleagues or students send you a 600-page book with no further clarification, editing or pagination. Verification is impossible. Similarly, to return to an observation made previously by both the German-American mathematician and economist Oskar Morgenstern (1902-1977) [48] and the Frenchman Gilles-Gaston Granger (1920-2016) [49], the issue of data validity and reliability does not seem to be of interest to many researchers. For these two distinguished experts in comparative epistemology, it was economists who were being targeted. But we can be sure than many other researchers are affected. I am certain that these testimonies resonate with you as they do with me. Training our students in rigour, precision and criticism will certainly help to make them not only good researchers, but also mindful and courageous intellectuals, in other words individuals capable of grasping the most difficult or far-fetched content, breaking free from it, and communicating only what is accurate and certain.

Relativity and humility stem from our awareness of our weaknesses when faced with the world and the difficulty we have in grasping the system as a whole. They are also nurtured by the legitimate notion that explanations of phenomena and their truth change with scientific advances. It cannot be denied, states Granger, that a Newtonian truth concerning the trajectory of a star differs from Einstein’s truth regarding the same object [50]. Rather than being sceptical about scientific knowledge, it is instead a question of looking at ourselves, as human beings, and acknowledging the richness of our capacity to articulate sentiment, reason and experience. At a time when cybernetic dreams are becoming a reality in artificial general intelligence, we have an ever-increasing number of human and scientific references to show us the way.

Thus, to conclude this talk, I will refer to the author of La Science expérimentale, Claude Bernard (1813-1878). In his acceptance speech at the Académie française, on 27 May 1869, the great doctor and philologist observed that, in the progressive development of humanity, poetry, philosophy and science express the three phases of our intelligence, moving successively through sentiment, reason and experience [51].

Nevertheless, states Bernard, it would be wrong to believe that if one follows the precepts of the experimental method, the researcher – and I would say the intellectual – must reject all a priori notions and silence their sentiment, so that their views are based solely on the results of the experiment. In reality, he adds, the laws that govern manifestations of human intelligence do not allow the researcher to proceed other than by always, and successively, moving through sentiment, reason and experience. But, convinced of the worthlessness of the spirit when reduced to itself, he gives experience (experimentation) a dominant influence and he tries to guard against the impatience of knowing, which leads us constantly to make mistakes. We must therefore go in search of the truth calmly and without haste, relying on reason, or reasoning, which always serves to guide us, but, at every step, we must temper it and tame it through experience, in the knowledge that, unbeknown to us, sentiment causes us return to the origin of things [52].

If, in 2021, European democratic conceptions have fundamentally evolved since Guizot, thanks to progress in education and in particular within higher education, heuristics as a tool for discovering facts remains a sensitive concern for researchers of all disciplines, but also citizens, in a digital world. European universities, such as those gathered in EUNICE, considering their background, but also above all by their ambition, undoubtedly constitute one of the best responses to real concerns.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

 

[1] This text is the background paper of the conference that I presented on October 21, 2021 at the Academic Hall of the University of Mons, as part of EUNICE WEEKS mobilising, with the support of the European Commission, the network which brings together the universities of Brandenburg, Cantabria, Catania, Lille – Hauts de France, Poznań, Vaasa and Mons.

[2] Laurent THEIS, Guizot, La traversée d’un siècle, Paris, CNRS Editions, 2014. – Edition Kindle, Location 1104. – François Guizot, in Encyclopaedia Britannica, Oct. 8, 2021, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Francois-Guizot

[3] René HOVEN, Jacques STIENNON, Pierre-Marie GASON, Jean Chapeaville (1551-1617) et ses amis. Contribution à l’historiographie liégeoise, Bruxelles, Académie royale de Belgique, 2004 – Paul DELFORGE, Jean Chapeaville (1551-1617), Connaître la Wallonie, Namur,  December 2014. http://connaitrelawallonie.wallonie.be/fr/wallons-marquants/dictionnaire/chapeaville-jean#.YWrVvhpBzmE which, at the time, had fascinated Professor Jacques Stiennon (ULIEGE).

[4] Ibidem, Location 1149-1150.

[5] Guillaume de BERTHIER DE SAUVIGNY, François Guizot (1787-1874), in Encyclopædia Universalis accessed on 13 October  2021.https://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/francois-guizot/ – Pierre ROSANVALLON, Le moment Guizot, coll. Bibliothèque des Sciences humaines, Paris, NRF-Gallimard, 1985. – André JARDIN and André-Jean TUDESQ, La France des Notables, L’évolution générale, 1815-1848, Nouvelle Histoire de la France contemporaine, Paris, Seuil, 1988.

[6] François GUIZOT, Histoire des origines du gouvernement représentatif en Europe, p. 2, Paris, Didier, 1851. – (…) and man thus learns that in the infinitude of space opened to his knowledge, everything remains constantly fresh and inexhaustible, in regard to his ever-active and ever-limited intelligence. GUIZOT, History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe, p. 2,

[7] François GUIZOT, History of the Origin of Representative Government in Europe, translated by Andrew E. Scobe, p. 4, London, Henry G. Bohn, 1852.

https://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/61250/pg61250-images.html#Page_1

[8] Concerning these issues, see the always very valuable Jean PIAGET dir., Logique et connaissance scientifique, coll. Encyclopédie de la Pléiade, Paris, Gallimard, 1967. In particular, J. PIAGET, L’épistémologie et ses variétés, p. 3sv. – Hervé BARREAU, L’épistémologie, Paris, PuF, 2013.

[9] Gérald BRONNER, Apocalypse cognitive, Paris, PUF-Humensi, 2021.

[10] G. BRONNER, Apocalypse…, p. 220-221.

[11] Raymond ARON, La philosophie critique de l’histoire, Essai sur une théorie allemande de l’histoire (1938), Paris, Vrin, 3e ed., 1964.

[12] Raymond ARON, Communication devant la Société française de philosophie, 17 juin 1939, dans R. ARON, Croire en la démocratie, 1933-1944, Textes édités et présentés par Vincent Duclert, p. 102, Paris, Arthème-Fayard – Pluriel, 2017. – Jean BIRNBAUM, Le courage de la nuance, p. 73, Paris, Seuil, 2021.

[13] Alexis de TOCQUEVILLE, Democracy in America (1835), Translated by Harvey C. Mansfield & Delba Winthrop, p. 155, Chicago & London, The University of Chicago Press, 2002. – La Démocratie en Amérique, in Œuvres, collection La Pléade, t. 2, p. 185, Paris, Gallimard, 1992. – G. BRONNER, op. cit., p. 221.

[14] G. BRONNER, op. cit., p. 238 et 298

[15] Valérie IGOUNET, Derrière le Front, Histoires, analyses et décodage du Front national, 26 octobre 2015. https://blog.francetvinfo.fr/derriere-le-front/2015/10/26/les-francais-dabord.html

[16] Heather STEWART & Rowen MASON, Nigel Farage’s anti-migrant poster reported to police, in The Guardian, June 16, 2016. https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/16/nigel-farage-defends-ukip-breaking-point-poster-queue-of-migrants

[17] D. KAHNEMAN, Thinking, Fast and Slow, New York, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2011. – Trad. Système 1/ Système 2, Les deux vitesses de la pensée, Paris, Flammarion, 2012. – See also: D. KAHNEMAN et al., dir., Judgment under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases, Cambridge University Press, 1982.

[18] Daniel KAHNEMAN, Olivier SIBONY and Cass R. SUNSTEIN, Noise, A flaw in Human Judgment, p. 166-167, New York – Boston – London, Little Brown Spark, 2021.

[19] Ibidem, p. 168. – Paul SLOVIC, Psychological Study of Human Judgment: Implications for Investment Decision Making, in Journal of Finance, 27, 1972, p. 779.

[20] In the broadest sense of the concept, both Latin and Anglo-Saxon. See Gilles Gaston GRANGER, Epistémologie, dans Encyclopædia Universalis, viewed on 10 October 2021. https://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/epistemologie/

[21] Jean-Pierre CHRÉTIEN-GONI, Heuristique, dans Encyclopædia Universalis, viewed on 10 October 2021. https://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/heuristique/ – Avrum STROLL, Epistemology, in Encyclopaedia Britannica, viewed on 16 October 2021, https://www.britannica.com/topic/epistemology

[22] Jean LARGEAULT, Méthode, Encyclopædia Universalis, viewed on 10 October 2021. https://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/methode/ – Scientific Method, in Encyclopaedia Britannica, October 15, 2021, viewed on 17 October. https://www.britannica.com/science/scientific-method

[23] George POLYA, L’Heuristique est-elle un sujet d’étude raisonnable?, in Travail et Méthodes, Numéro Hors Série La Méthode dans les Sciences modernes, Paris, Sciences et Industrie, 1958.

[24] G. POLYA, How to Solve it?, Princeton University Press, 1945.

[25] G. POLYA, L’Heuristique est-elle un sujet d’étude raisonnable…, p. 284.

[26] Ibn KHALDUN, Le Livre des exemples, Autobiographie, Muqaddima, text translated and annotated by Abdesselam Cheddadi, collection Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, t. 1, p. 39, Paris, NRF-Gallimard, 2202. (Our translation in English) – Abdesselam CHEDDADI, Ibn Khaldûn, L’homme et le théoricien de la civilisation, p. 194, Paris, NRF-Gallimard, 2006.

[27] François DOSSE, L’histoire, p. 18-20, Paris, A. Colin, 2° éd., 2010. – Blandine BARRET-KRIEGEL, L’histoire à l’âge classique, vol. 2, p. 34, Paris, PUF, 1988.

[28] Ulick Peter BURKE, Lorenzo Valla, in Encyclopaedia Britannica, viewed on October 19, 2021 https://www.britannica.com/biography/Lorenzo-Valla- Donation of Constantin, in Encyclopaedia Britannica, viewed on October 19, 2021. https://www.britannica.com/topic/Donation-of-Constantine

[29] Charles-Victor LANGLOIS and Charles SEIGNOBOS, Introduction aux études historiques, p. 48-49, Paris, Hachette & Cie, 1898. 4 ed., s.d. (1909).

[30] Robert MARICHAL, La critique des textes, in Charles SAMARAN dir., L’histoire et ses méthodes, coll. Encyclopédie de la Pléiade, p. 1248, Paris, NRF-Gallimard, 1961.

[31] Gérard NOIREL, Preface by Charles-Victor LANGLOIS and Charles SEIGNOBOS, Introduction aux études historiques, Paris, ENS, 2014. https://books.openedition.org/enseditions/2042#ftn8

[32] Jean-Pierre OLIVIER de SARDAN, La rigueur du qualitatif, Les contraintes empiriques de l’interprétation socio-anthropologique, p. 7-10, Louvain-la-Neuve, Bruylant-Academia, 2008.

[33] Howard BECKER, Les ficelles du métier, Comment conduire sa recherche en Sciences sociales, p. 48, Paris, La Découverte, 2002. – J-P OLIVIER de SARDAN, op. cit., p. 8.

[34] F. DOSSE, L’histoire…, p. 29. Here, we are referring to Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges (1830-1889). See François HARTOG, Le XIXe siècle et l’histoire, Le cas Fustel de Coulanges, p. 351-352, Paris, PUF, 1988.

[35] Ch. SAMARAN, L’histoire et ses méthodes…, p. XII-XIII.

[36] Ibidem, p. XIII. – J. TULARD & G. THUILLIER, op. cit., p. 91.

[37] J. TULARD (1933) and .G. THUILLIER, La méthode en histoire…, p. 92-94.

[38] Françoise WAQUET, Une histoire émotionnelle du savoir, XVIIe-XXIe siècle, p. 325 , Paris, CNRS Editions, 2019.

[39] Lorraine DASTON, The moral Economy of Science, in Osiris, 10, 1995, p. 18-23. – F. WAQUET, op. cit., p. 393,

[40] Henri PIRENNE, De la méthode comparative en histoire, Discours prononcé à la séance d’ouverture du Ve Congrès international des Sciences historiques, 9 April 1923, Brussels, Weissenbruch, 1923. – F. WAQUET, op. cit., p. 306.

[41] F. PAQUET, op. cit., p. 303. – Paul WHITE, Darwin’s emotions, The Scientific self and the sentiment of objectivity, in Isis, 100, 2009, p. 825.

[42] François RUSSO, Valeur et situation de la méthode scientifique, in La méthode dans les sciences modernes…, p. 341. – See also: F. RUSSO, Nature et méthode de l’histoire des sciences, Paris, Blanchard, 1984.

[43] Georges DUBY, L’histoire continue, p. 72-78, Paris, Odile Jacob, 1991.

[44] Pierre ROSANVALLON, Le moment Guizot, coll. Bibliothèque des sciences humaines, p. 75 et 87, Paris, NRF-Gallimard, 1985.

[45] Michel LUSSAULT, L’avènement du monde, Essai sur l’habitation humaine de la Terre, Paris, Seuil, 2013.

[46] Jacques FRANEAU, D’où vient et où va la science ? Formal address to mark the start of term at the Faculté polytechnique de Mons, 26 September 1964, p. 58.

[47] René POMMEAU, Préface, in VOLTAIRE, Œuvres historiques,  p. 14, Paris, NRF-Gallimard, 1957.

[48] Oskar MORGENSTERN, On the accuracy of Economic Observation, Princeton, 1950.

[49] Gilles-Gaston GRANGER, La vérification, p. 191, Paris, Odile Jacob, 1992.

[50] Ibidem, p. 10.

[51] Claude BERNARD, Discours de réception à l’Académie française, 27 May 1869, in Claude BERNARD, La Science expérimentale,  p. 405-406, Paris, Baillière & Fils, 3rd ed., 1890.

[52] Ibidem, p. 439.

Namur, le 10 juin 2020.

Les collabos wallons. C’est un des titres en quatrième de couverture du magazine Wilfried, n°11, Printemps 2020. À l’intérieur, on découvre le titre complet : Wallonie : des collabos parmi nos grands-pères. Souviens-toi de la guerre dernière, en face, p. 64, d’une pleine page reproduisant une affiche de recrutement de la division SS Wallonie : visage, inscription Wallonie en jaune sur fond noir, couleurs nationales belges et runes SS. On nous annonce avec l’enquête de Nicolas Lahaut : un tabou ou un désintérêt à l’origine d’un long silence, des pages maudites, un document d’une portée historique rare. D’emblée l’article évoque selon l’auteur un fait historique souvent tu : la Wallonie connut d’autres réalités que la résistance. (…) en Wallonie, un lourd silence résonne

1. Il n’y a pas que des Flamands qui ont pactisé avec les nazis

Le collaborateur de Wilfried a eu l’excellente idée d’aller interroger Alain Colignon, chercheur au Centre d’Études Guerres et Société à Bruxelles. On entend d’ici l’historien liégeois, qualifié d’esprit taquin, prévenir d’emblée son interlocuteur que soutenir l’hypothèse d’un tabou francophone sur la collaboration, c’est farfouiller en vain dans un placard dépourvu de cadavre [1]. En trois colonnes d’interview, Alain Colignon démonte le pitch initial du magazine. Il n’y a ni tabou ni silence. Est-ce pour autant moins intéressant ? En effet, il n’y a pas que des Flamands qui ont pactisé avec les nazis, il y a aussi des Wallons. Comme l’indique le chercheur, non seulement ils étaient bien moins nombreux qu’en Flandre, mais en plus en Wallonie, ils étaient dénoncés, traqués, assiégés, comme l’a d’ailleurs bien observé dès 1994 l’historien Martin Conway [2]. Alain Colignon raconte l’anecdote de son quartier où le laitier, surnommé « Tcherkassy »  « avait fait avec les Boches » ; on le désignait encore comme tel dans les années soixante. Philippe Destatte se souvient s’être fait copieusement sermonner par sa grand-mère paternelle à Châtelet vers 1968, parce qu’il avait prononcé le nom de famille d’une de ses amies de 14 ans, sans savoir que ses parents avaient été rexistes pendant la guerre. L’injonction de ne plus la fréquenter fut aussi immédiate que violente… La grand-mère de l’historien avait jadis été arrêtée par la Gestapo, battue et incarcérée. Il n’a pas tant appris ce jour-là que des collaborateurs avaient sévi en Wallonie que le fait, alors plus surprenant à ses yeux, qu’ils n’avaient pas tous été fusillés…

Dès 1980, un autre historien de ce qui s’appelait naguère le Centre d’Études et de Recherche de la Seconde Guerre mondiale avait noté que la Résistance n’était pas un phénomène spécifiquement wallon, pas plus que la collaboration n’était une attitude spécifiquement flamande. Mais observait José Gotovitch, à aucun moment […], en Wallonie, cette collaboration ne put prendre un contour effecti­vement wallon, s’appuyer sur une réalité nationaliste [3]. On pourrait ajouter que si Degrelle a dû appeler sa légion Wallonie, c’est pour se distinguer des unités déjà reconnues par les Allemands du côté flamand. En fait, si on évoque souvent Rex et la Légion « Wallonie » comme exemples de la collaboration wallonne, l’idéologie de ces organisations était pourtant claire­ment nationaliste belge. Comme l’écrit le Pays réel en août 1941 : précédée de nos couleurs nationales et de l’étendard de la croix de Bourgogne, la Légion est partie sous les acclamations de la foule, « Au-delà de Rex, dit Degrelle, il y a la Belgique, C’est pour la Belgique que Rex a vécu, c’est pour elle que Rex vit et offre vos vies ! » [4].

Sur une plateforme virtuelle grand public consacrée à la Belgique et à ses habitants pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, Martin Conway souligne judicieusement que la comparaison avec la situation en Flandre offre une image tronquée de la collaboration en Wallonie. Aucun cheminement naturel ne liait le sentiment wallon et le soutien au Troisième Reich. Évoquant ensuite Rex et les mouvements gravitant autour de l’Ordre nouveau, le professeur de l’Université d’Oxford indique que c’est leur fragmentation qui explique la faiblesse de la mémoire de la collaboration en Wallonie, aucun mouvement n’ayant pris la relève après la Libération et bien peu de personnes ayant souhaité s’identifier au choix de la collaboration en Wallonie [5]. C’est également pour cette raison que, après le conflit, et comme le rappelle Alain Colignon, la collaboration a été plus durement sanctionnée en Wallonie qu’en Flandre [6].

 Rappelons aussi que, de 1940 à 1945, 60.000 de nos grands-pères wallons se trouvaient dans des camps de prisonniers en Allemagne, la plupart des Flamands ayant été libérés dès l’été 1940 [7].

2. Sensationnalisme et culpabilisation

Pourquoi un certain sensationnalisme journalistique vient-il déformer une thématique si délicate et si bien expliquée par les chercheurs ? Pourquoi semer un doute vicieux et vicié ? Pourquoi feindre autant de malentendus alors que tout est clair et transparent ? Telles sont les questions qui se posent à la lecture du « chapeau » d’un article au titre aussi racoleur. Dans le corps de l’article, on s’étonne aussi d’autres considérations. Pourquoi parler de « tabou » ou de « désintérêt » quand on ne trouve en pays wallon qu’une famille de collaborateur sur trois générations prête à témoigner ? En quoi la présence d’anciens SS « Wallonie » auprès de Degrelle à Malaga en 1984 serait-elle la preuve que la Wallonie connut d’autres réalités que la gloire de la résistance ? En quoi le « mea culpa » d’hommes politiques flamands concernant le passé de leurs grands-parents serait-il la manifestation d’un profond silence wallon ? Reprocherait-on quelque chose à André Cools qui a perdu son père, Marcel, résistant, agent de renseignements, dénoncé, arrêté et décédé en déportation en 1942 ? Reprocherait-on à Pierre Clerdent, gouverneur des provinces de Luxembourg et de Liège, sénateur, d’avoir été chef national et fondateur de l’Armée de Libération ? Reprocherait-on à Gérard Deprez et Guy Lutgen voire à Benoît Lutgen, d’avoir perdu leur père (et grand-père), soupçonné de résistance et froidement abattu à Noville par une unité spéciale de la Gestapo en décembre 1941 ? L’association entre Résistance et Wallonie continuerait-elle d’être impossible à concevoir ? [8]

Monument national de la Résistance, inauguré à Liège, le 8 mai 1955
Photo Paul Delforge, Diffusion Institut Destrée, © Sofam

Comme très souvent ces dernières années, la quête de sensations fortes et la volonté de culpabiliser l’emportent sur la somme d’informations recueillies à bonne source, comme s’il fallait absolument politiser une question d’histoire. Surtout, alors que l’approche psychologico-historique de la problématique semble apporter des éléments valorisant une démarche collective, le lecteur en ressort avec l’impression que « l’on nous cache toujours quelque chose ». Une sorte d’a priori négatif vient jeter la suspicion sur un constat qui nous paraît heureux et positif, mais qui n’est pas mis en évidence par l’auteur de l’article : la société wallonne a parfaitement retenu les leçons de l’histoire ; le comportement de quelques rares collaborateurs n’est et ne sera jamais banalisé ; il n’est pas du tout oublié. La société wallonne ne partage pas les valeurs des rexistes, des fascistes et surtout des profiteurs de guerre. Loin d’être un « morceau de notre passé disparu », les dérives de quelques-uns restent condamnées, sans excuses et sans pardon, par ceux qui vivent en Wallonie, même 80 ans après la Seconde Guerre mondiale. L’inconscient collectif a intégré une leçon qui n’est pas écrite. Qu’elle soit tacite n’en fait pas un profond silence ni un tabou, mais plutôt un marqueur d’identité que toute société démocratique devrait être fière de valoriser. Sauf en Belgique. Pourtant, en Wallonie, la leçon a été parfaitement assimilée. Le passé, loin d’avoir disparu, est toujours présent et la représentation électorale, du communal au fédéral en passant par le provincial et le régional, voire l’Europe, témoigne que les citoyennes et citoyens wallons continuent de résister, de génération en génération, à la tentation fasciste. Pourvu que cela dure, car rien, en ce domaine, n’est jamais totalement acquis. L’immunité collective n’existe pas en cette matière. Seul le vaccin de l’éducation et de l’évocation du passé est efficace. Il doit être renouvelé chaque année, à chaque génération, tant le risque de contagion est virulent.

Alors pourquoi une telle approche journalistique qui se complaît à maltraiter un tel sujet en mêlant, dans son introduction, des expressions ou des mots associés comme collaboration, tabou, long silence, pages maudites, roman noir, « fait avec les Boches ». Ce racolage n’apporte rien ; au contraire ! Le corps du texte en témoigne. Les historiens de la Seconde Guerre mondiale traitent le sujet avec sérénité et rigueur. Il est donc inutile de compiler des fake news [9] pour attirer le badaud et jouer sur l’affectif ; surtout en Wallonie, le citoyen est suffisamment émancipé et cultivé pour se moquer d’un Léon Degrelle qui proclamait la germanité des Wallons… En 2011, l’historien Eddy de Bruyne espérait qu’on en aurait terminé des inepties sur Degrelle [10]. Cela devrait être le cas et Alain Colignon explique clairement la question. En historien formé à l’école liégeoise de la critique historique, il n’esquive aucune question, se montre clair et précis, apporte des chiffres, mentionne des faits et surtout analyse la question avec nuance.

Il est vrai cependant que l’on n’avancera jamais dans la compréhension du passé, tant que le vocabulaire continuera à faire obstacle. Jamais il ne sera possible de s’entendre tant que l’on introduira le mot francophone dans le débat. S’agit-il d’un Flamand qui parle français ? Ce n’est donc pas un Wallon. S’agit d’un Bruxellois ? Pourquoi n’est-il jamais explicitement identifié comme tel ? Cela fait maintenant 50 ans que la Constitution a reconnu une réalité politico-sociologique qui datait d’avant la Seconde Guerre mondiale… Sauf à nourrir des arrière-pensées, personne ne devrait décidément plus hésiter à appeler un chat un chat, un résistant, un résistant, et un collabo, un collabo.

3. Et puis, il y a Van Grieken…

Si l’honneur de la plupart de nos grands-pères est sauf, est-ce le cas du numéro de printemps de Wilfried qui invite Van Grieken, le führer du Vlaams Belang ?

Dans une belle analyse des cordons sanitaires ou de leur absence, Paul Piret – si nous lisons bien – préconise d’œuvrer plus activement à la responsabilité sociale d’expliquer, analyser, mettre en perspective…évoquant l’hypothèse de questionner… Van Grieken [11].

On aurait aimé que Wilfried applique les recommandations de Paul Piret. Or, ce n’est pas le cas, n’en déplaise à son rédacteur en chef [12]. En effet, ni le portrait du ministre des Affaires intérieures et administratives, de l’Intégration et de l’Égalité des chances du Gouvernement flamand, Bart Somers, ni l’entretien croisé avec les écologistes Jos Geysels et Marcel Cheron, ni la deuxième colonne de l’éditorial du magazine, Les yeux ouverts dans le noir, ne constituent l’important appareil critique qui aurait dû baliser l’interview de Tom Van Grieken. Faire commenter par d’autres politiques une interview n’ajoute que des opinions aux opinions. Au moins eût-il fallu que ces commentaires réagissent à l’interview, ce qui n’est pas le cas. Lorsque Wilfried publie sur six pages, sans avertissement spécifique, mais avec un portrait à nos yeux plutôt complaisant, une interview dans laquelle Tom Van Grieken présente son horizon pour 2024, le magazine, n’en déplaise à son rédacteur en chef, fait de la politique, et ne respecte pas le cordon sanitaire appliqué généralement en Wallonie et à Bruxelles.

Pour l’être humain, garder les yeux ouverts dans le noir ne permet pas de voir, s’il n’utilise pas une lampe. Cette lampe, elle devait être celle d’analystes, de décodeurs – qu’ils soient journalistes, politologues, philosophes ou historiens – qui rappellent de manière structurée et pédagogique les origines, racines, fondements de ce que l’on nomme maladroitement l’extrême droite et surtout en quoi et pourquoi le Vlaams Belang est un parti fasciste. Il convient d’expliquer que ce terme ne constitue pas une insulte, mais une doctrine élaborée et redoutable parce s’adressant à une large part de la société, ancrée à la fois à droite et à gauche, recrutant dans des franges sociales très diverses, à la fois des chômeurs, des ouvriers, des professeurs, des indépendants et des cadres, une doctrine à la fois révolutionnaire, nationaliste au sens des nationalistes, sociale au sens des socialistes. Comme le rappelle l’historien franco-israélien Zeev Sternhell, il s’agit à la fois d’un mouvement de masse et d’un phénomène intellectuel élitiste capable d’attirer des éléments d’avant-garde les plus avancés de leur temps [13]. Ainsi le positionnement du Vlaams Belang aurait-il dû faire l’objet d’une remise en contexte dans l’évolution du fascisme flamand depuis l’Entre-deux-guerres, car il en est inséparable, mais aussi dans ses évolutions récentes qui expliquent probablement son succès, notamment son investissement sur les thèmes sociaux, comme l’a fait le FN en France [14] .

Chercher à comprendre, décoder était le prix indispensable à payer pour ouvrir ses colonnes au Vlaams Belang. C’est malheureusement là que Wilfried a failli, rejoignant du même coup la naïveté de nos pires grands-pères….

Paul Delforge et Philippe Destatte

historiens

 

[1] Nicolas LAHAUT, Wallonie : des collabos parmi nos grands-pères, Souviens-toi la guerre dernière, dans Wilfried n°11, Printemps 2020, p. 65-66.

[2] Martin CONWAY, Degrelle, Les années de collaboration, 1940-1944 : le rexisme de guerre, p. 254sv, Bruxelles, Quorum, 1994.

[3] José GOTOVITCH, Wallons et Flamands…, Wallons et Flamands: le fossé se creuse, dans Hervé HASQUIN dir. La Wallonie, Le Pays et les Hommes, Histoire, Economie, Société, t. 2,  p. 309, Bruxelles, Renaissance du Livre, 1980.

[4] Le Pays réel, 9 août 1941, p. 1.

[5] Martin CONWAY, Collaboration en Wallonie, Belgium WWII, s.d. consulté le 10 juin 2020.

https://www.belgiumwwii.be/belgique-en-guerre/articles/collaboration-en-wallonie.html

Martin Conway, Degrelle. Les années de collaboration, Ottignies-Louvain-la-Neuve, Quorum, 1994. On se référera aussi à Eddy De Bruyne, Les Wallons meurent à l’Est : La Légion Wallonie et Léon Degrelle sur le front russe 1941-1945, Bruxelles Didier Hatier, 1991.

[6] N. LAHAUT, op. cit, p. 67.

[7] Paul DELFORGE et Philippe DESTATTE, Les Combattants de ’40, Hommage de la Wallonie aux prisonniers de guerre, Liège, 1995, 168 p.

[8] P. DELFORGE, Résistance et Wallonie : un binôme impossible ?, dans Robert VANDENBUSSCHE, Mémoires et représentations de la résistance, Septentrion, 2013, p. 99-126,

[9] Déjà en février 2019, Le Soir avait évoqué « la sombre histoire des SS wallons », https://soirmag.lesoir.be/206290/article/2019-02-13/la-sombre-histoire-des-ss-wallons

[10] Eddy DE BRUYN, Pour en finir avec Léon DEGRELLE, dans Le Vif, 3 mai 2011. https://www.levif.be/actualite/belgique/pour-en-finir-avec-leon-degrelle/article-normal-153667.html?cookie_check=1591773400

E. DE BRUYN, Léon Degrelle et la Légion Wallonie, La fin d’une légende, Liège, Luc Pire, 2011. – On pourra utilement se référer au compte rendu par Francis BALACE du livre de Flore PLISNIER,  Ils ont pris les armes pour Hitler, La collaboration armée en Belgique francophone 1940-1944, Bruxelles, Luc Pire – CEGES, 2008. dans Journal of Belgian History (RBHC-BTNG), n°20, 2008, p. 307-310.

https://www.journalbelgianhistory.be/fr/system/files/edition_data/articlepdf/010b_Bibliotheque7.pdf?fbclid=IwAR23MTQ04KpForpLyg9vkumVoSkGl5i5EHNf6DWXoPRbKRAWAQcg1RB6Fa8

[11] Paul PIRET, Un cordon qui n’est pas une grosse ficelle, dans Wilfried n°11, Printemps 2020, p. 43.

[12] François BRABANT, Non, Wilfried n’a pas rompu le cordon sanitaire, Site de Wilfried, s.d.,  https://wilfriedmag.be/a-propos/cordon-mediatique/ – Voir également : Olivier MOUTON, Le cordon médiatique brisé du côté francophone : l’interview du Belang fait polémique, dans Le Vif, 23 avril 2020.

https://www.levif.be/actualite/belgique/le-cordon-mediatique-brise-du-cote-francophone-l-interview-du-belang-fait-polemique/article-normal-1280961.html

[13] Zeev STERNHELL, L’histoire refoulée, La Rocque, les Croix de feu et la question du fascisme français, p. 93-94, Paris, Le Cerf, 2019. L’analyse du fascisme n’est pas simple et connaît aussi ses propres et salutaires interrogations, voir : Serge BERSTEIN et Michael WINOCK, Fascisme français ? La controverse, Paris, CNRS, 2014.

[14] Ph. DESTATTE, Le Front national est un parti fasciste, Blog PhD2050, 11 décembre 2015. https://phd2050.org/2015/12/11/le-front-national-est-un-parti-fasciste-2/

Referring to a study in March 2017 by the Institute for the Future (Palo Alto, California), the Mosan Free University College (HELMo) [1] noted, at the start of the 2018-2019 academic year, that 85% of the jobs in 2030 have not yet been invented [2]. The HELMo team rightly pointed out that population ageing, climate and energy changes, mass migrations and, of course, digital technologies, robotisation and other scientific advances are all drivers of change that will revolutionise the entire world. Highlighting its vocational emphasis as a higher education institution, it wondered whether the jobs for which it was training people today would still exist tomorrow. At the same time, its Director-President Alexandre Lodez, along with the teaching staff representative, lawyer Vincent Thiry, and the student representative, pointed out that HELMo did not only want to train human operational resources in response to a particular demand from the labour market, but also wanted to train responsible citizens capable of progressing throughout their careers and lives. Everyone was asking a key question: What, therefore, are the key skills to be consolidated or developed?

I will try to answer this question in three stages.

Firstly, by mentioning the global upheavals and their effects on jobs. Then, by drawing on a survey carried out by futurists and experts from around the world this summer, the results of which were summarised in early September 2018. And finally, by a short conclusion expressing utopia and realism.

1. Global upheavals

On the issue of technical and economic changes, we could proceed by mentioning the many contemporary studies dealing with this topic, including those by Jeremy Rifkin [3], Chris Anderson [4], Dorothée Kohler and Jean-Daniel Weisz [5], François Bourdoncle and Pierre Veltz and Thierry Weil [6]. We could also describe the New Industrial Paradigm [7]. Or, to reflect current events, we could even call on Thierry Geerts, head of Google Belgium, whose work, Digitalis [8] is very popular at present.

But it is to Raymond Collard that I will refer. Former professor at the University of Namur, Honorary Director-General of the Research, Statistics and Information Service at the Ministry of the Wallonia Region – the current Public Service of Wallonia – and scientific coordinator of the permanent Louvain Research and Development Group, Raymond Collard was born in 1928, but his death in Jemeppe-sur-Meuse on 8 July 2018 was met with indifference by Wallonia. It was only through an email from my colleague and friend André-Yves Portnoff on 13 September that I learned, from Paris, about his death.

On 15 March 1985, an article in the journal La Wallonie caught my attention. The title of this paper by Raymond Collard was provocative: Seeking Walloon pioneers! But the question was specific and could be asked again thirty-three years later: Are there, among the readers of this journal, men and women who can identify large or small businesses in Wallonia that truly live according to the principles of the “intelligence revolution”? The paper made reference to the presentation, in Paris, of the report drawn up by a team led by futurists: according to the report on the state of technology, we are witnessing the advent not of the information society, as is often said, particularly in Japan, but of the “creation society”, whose vital resource is intelligence and talent rather than capital. That is also why we talk of the intelligence revolution, a revolution which requires the harnessing of intelligence, something which cannot be done by force. The normal relationships between power and skills are altered at all levels.

The report itself, entitled La Révolution de l’intelligence [9], complemented my reading of the works of John Naisbitt [10] and Alvin Toffler [11]. It was described extensively by Raymond Collard. This relationship builder, as André-Yves Portnoff [12] called him, had travelled to Paris for the presentation of this document by Thierry Gaudin, civil engineer and head of the Centre de Prospective et d’Évaluation [Foresight and Assessment Centre] at the French ministry of Research, and Portnoff, then editor-in-chief of Sciences et Techniques, published by the French Society of Scientists and Engineers. The Minister for Research and Technology, Hubert Currien, and the Minister for Industrial Redeployment and Foreign Trade Edith Cresson were present at the event. Both were members of the government of Laurent Fabius while François Mitterrand was President of the Republic. It is not surprising that two ministers were present since the Centre de Prospective et d’Évaluation (CPE) was a service common to both ministries.

S-T_Revolution-Intelligence_1985

After finding this report, then photocopying it in the library, I literally devoured it – and then bought it on eBay. In 2018, it spells out a first clear message: the upheavals we are experiencing today are not new, even if they seem to be gathering momentum. Another message from Thierry Gaudin is that the cognitive revolution, reflected in the changes underway, has been ongoing since the start of the 1970s and will continue for several more decades.

I was not surprised then, as I am not surprised now. The conceptual context of the evolution of the technological system, leading to widespread change in all areas of society, is one I was familiar with. It had been taught to me at the University of Liège by Professor Pierre Lebrun, a historian and economist with a brilliant, incisive mind, whose astute words I would go and listen to, as one might listen to some freebooter down at the harbour. I taught this conceptual context to my students at Les Rivageois (Haute École Charlemagne) and at the High School Liège 2, and I teach it still at the University of Mons and even in Paris. Which is only fitting.

The analysis model for this context was conceptualised by Bertrand Gille, a technology historian and Professor at the École pratique des Hautes Études in Paris. In it, the director of the remarkable Histoire des Techniques in L’Encyclopédie de La Pléade, at Gallimard [13], clearly showed that it was the convergence of the rapid changes in the levels of training among the population and the spread of scientific and technical knowledge that was the driver of the technological progress that brought about the engineering Industrial Revolution. It will come as no surprise that Bertrand Gille was also a former teacher of Professor Robert Halleux, who was himself the founder of the Science and Technology Centre at the University of Liège. In this way, Bertrand Gille left his mark on several generations of researchers, historians and futurists, some devoting themselves to just one of the tasks, others to the other, and still others to both.

This model, which was reviewed by Jacques Ellul and Thierry Gaudin, imagines that the medieval technological system, highlighted by Fernand Braudel, Georges Duby and Emmanuel Leroy Ladurie, corresponds to an industrial technological system, which was the driving force and the product of an Industrial Revolution, described by Pierre Lebrun, Marinette Bruwier et al.[14], and, finally, a technological system under development, under construction, fostering the Intelligence Revolution and far from over. Land was key in the first revolution, capital in the second, and the third is based on the minds of men and women. Each time, it is materials, energy, the relationship with living beings and time that are involved.

In 1985, Raymond Collard explained what he had clearly understood from the report produced by Gaudin and Portnoff and the several hundred researchers they enlisted: the importance of the four major changes in the poles that are restructuring society:

– the huge choice of materials and their horizontal percolation, ranging from uses in the high-tech sectors to more common uses;

– the tension between nuclear power and saving energy resources, in a context of recycling;

– the relationship with living beings and the huge field of biotechnology, including genetics;

– the new structure of time punctuated in nanoseconds by microprocessors.

Raymond Collard explored all these points some time later in a remarkable speech to the first Wallonia toward the future Congress in Charleroi, in October 1987, entitled: Foresight 2007 … recovering from the crisis, changes in work production methods and employment, which is still available online on The Destree Institute website [15]. In this speech, Collard, who was Professor at the Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences at the University of Namur, noted the following: it has been written that microelectronics is intellectualising industry. We are experiencing an industrial revolution that can be described as an “intelligence revolution”. The development of the possibilities created by the dramatic advances in microelectronics has opened up vast spheres to computer technology. Tomorrow, we will make greater use of artificial intelligence, which will be in evidence everywhere with the implementation of fifth-generation computers [16].

The 1985 report by the CPE remains a mine of information for anyone wanting to understand the changes underway, by looking both retrospectively – examining futures that did not happen – and prospectively – envisaging possible futures to construct a desirable future. There are some precepts to be drawn that are useful mainly for higher educational institutions and our businesses. The following give us cause to reflect:

experience shows that the introduction of new technologies is harmonious only if the training comes before the machines” (p.15).

it is no longer possible to develop quality without giving each person control over their own work” (p.15).

giving a voice only to management means wasting 99% of the intellectual resources in the business” or the organisation. (…) Harnessing all the intelligence is becoming essential (p.42).

“a successful company is one that is best able to harness the imagination, intelligence and desire of its staff” (45).

“the new source of power is not money in the hands of a few, but information in the hands of many”. Quotation taken from the works of John Naisbitt (p.45).

But, above all, the text shows, in the words of the German philosopher Martin Heidegger, that the essence of technology has nothing to do with technology [17]. Everything in technology was first dreamed up by man, and what has been successful has also been accepted by human society, states the report [18]. For this report on the state of technology is also a lesson in foresight. It reminds us, specifically through retrospect, that we are very poor at anticipating what does not already exist. Of course, as Gaston Berger stated on several occasions, the future does not exist as an object of knowledge. It exists solely as a land for conquest, desire and strategy. It is the place, along with the present, where we can innovate and create.

We often mistakenly believe that technologies will find their application very quickly or even immediately. Interviewed in February 1970 about 1980, the writer Arthur Koestler, author of Zero and Infinity, envisaged – as we do today – our houses inhabited by domestic robots that are programmed every morning. He imagined electric mini-cars in city centres closed to all other forms of traffic. He thought that telematic communications would, in 1980, allow us to talk constantly by video so as to avoid travelling. Interviewed at the same time, the great American futurist Herman Kahn, cofounder of the Hudson Institute, imagined that, in 1980, teaching would be assisted by computers which would play, for children, an educational role equivalent to the role filled by their parents and teachers[19].

The world continues to change, sustained, and also constrained, by the four poles. The transition challenges us and we are trying to give the impression that we are in control of it, even if we have no idea what we will find during its consolidation phase, sometime in the 22nd century.

Which jobs will survive these upheavals? Such foresight concerning jobs and qualifications is difficult. It involves identifying changes in employment and jobs while the labour market is changing, organisations are changing and the environment and the economic ecosystem are changing. But it also involves taking into account the possible life paths of the learners in this changing society [20], anticipating skills needs and measuring workforce turnover.

What we have also shown, by working with the area authorities, vocational education institutions and training bodies is that it is often at micro and territorial level that we are able to anticipate, since it seems that the project areas will be required, in ten to fifteen years at the latest, to be places for interaction and the implementation of (re)harmonised education, training and transformation policies for our society, with varying degrees of decentralisation, deconcentration, delegation, contractualisation and stakeholder autonomy. It is probably the latter context that will be the most creative and innovative, and one in which progress must be made. This requires cohesive, inspirational visions per area at the European, federal, regional and territorial level.

In leading the permanent Louvain Research and Development Group since the mid-1960s, particularly with the help of Philippe le Hodey and Michel Woitrin and the support of Professor Philippe de Woot, Raymond Collard had successfully set up and operated a genuine platform of the sort advocated by the European Commission today. Referring, as always, to Thierry Gaudin, he noted in 2000 that understanding innovation means grasping technology, not in terms of what is already there but in terms of revealing what is not yet there [21]. And although Raymond Collard recognised that this required a considerable R&D effort, he observed that this was not enough: as an act of creation which the market has to validate, innovation is the result of an interdisciplinary and interactive process, consisting of interactions within the business itself and between the business and its environment, particularly in terms of “winning” and managing knowledge and skills [22]. With, at the heart its approach, the idea, dear to François Perroux and highlighted by the work of the Louvain Research and Development Group in 2002, that a spirit is creative if it is both open and suited to combining what it receives and finding new combinatorial frameworks [23].

This thought is undoubtedly still powerful, and will remain so.

2. Foresight: from technological innovation to educational innovation

Like any historian, the futurist cannot work without raw material, without a source. For the latter, collective intelligence is the real fuel for his innovative capacity.

To that end, in 2000, The Destree Institute joined the Millennium Project. This global network for future studies and research was founded in 1996 in Washington by the American Council for the United Nations University, with the objective of improving the future prospects for humanity. It is a global participatory think tank, organised in more than sixty nodes, which are themselves heads of networks, involving universities, businesses and private and public research centres. Since 2002, The Destree Institute has represented the Brussels-Area Node which aims to be cross-border and connected with the European institutions [24].

The-Millennium-Project_logo250

In preparation for a wide-ranging study entitled Future Work/Technology 2050, the Millennium Project Planning Committee drafted some global scenarios to which they sought reactions from around 450 futurists and other researchers or stakeholders. A series of seminars was organised in twenty countries in order to identify the issues and determine appropriate strategies to address them. It was on this basis that a series of real-time consultations with experts (Real-Time Delphi) was organised on issues of education and learning, government and governance, businesses and work, culture and art and science and technology. From a series of 250 identified actions, 20 were selected by the panel of experts in the field of education and learning.

The complete list of the 20 actions is shown below. I have ordered them, for the first five at least, according to their level of relevance – effectiveness and feasibility –, as they were ranked by the international panel.

The first action on this list concerns the educational axes. This involves:

4. Increase focus on developing creativity, critical thinking, human relations, philosophy, entrepreneurship (individual and teams), art, self-employment, social harmony, ethics, and values, to know thyself to build and lead a meaningful working life with self-assessment of progress on one’s own goals and objectives (as Finland is implementing). 

The second will delight futurist teachers, since it involves:

20. Include futures as we include history in the curriculum. Teach alternative visions of the future, foresight, and the ability to assess potential futures. 

The third action is a measure of social cohesion:

6. Make Tele-education free everywhere; ubiquitous, lifelong learning systems.

The fourth, in my view, is probably the most important at the operational level:

2. Shift education/learning systems more toward mastering skills than mastering a profession. 

The fifth will totally transform the system:

3. In parallel to STEM (and/or STEAM – science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) create a hybrid system of self-paced inquiry-based learning for self-actualization; retrain teachers as coaches using new AI tools with students.

The 15 other actions are listed in no particular order, some complementing initiatives on the ground, particularly in the Liège-Luxembourg academic Pole.

1. Make increasing individual intelligence a national objective of education (by whatever definition of intelligence a nation selects, increasing “it” would be a national objective). 

5. Continually update the way we teach and how we learn from on-going new insights in neuroscience. 

7. Unify universities and vocational training centres and increase cooperation between schools and outside public good projects.

8. Utilize robots and Artificial Intelligence in education. 

9. Focus on exponential technologies and team entrepreneurship.

10. Change curriculum at all levels to normalize self-employment. 

11. Train guidance counsellors to be more future-oriented in schools. 

12. Share the responsibility of parenting as an educational community. 

13. Promote “communities of practice” that continually seek improvement of learning systems. 

14. Integrate Simulation-Based Learning using multiplayer environments. 

15. Include learning the security concerns with respect to teaching (and learning) technology. 

16. Incorporate job market intelligence systems into education and employment systems. 

17. The government, employers across all industry sectors, and the labour unions should cooperate in creating adequate models of lifelong learning. 

18. Create systems of learning from birth to three years old; this is the key stage for developing creativity, personality. 

19. Create mass public awareness campaigns with celebrities about actions to address the issues in the great transitions coming up around the world [25].

We can appreciate that these actions do not all have the same relevance, status or potential impact. That is why the top five have been highlighted. However, the majority are based on a proactive logic of increasing our capacities for educating and emancipating men and women. The fact that these actions have been thought about on all continents, by disparate stakeholders, with a genuine convergence of thought, is certainly not insignificant.

3. Conclusion: in the long term, humans are the safest bet

As regards Wallonia, and Liège in particular, we are familiar with the need to create value collectively so that we are able to make ourselves autonomous and so that we can be certain of being able to face the challenges of the future. Without question, we must place social cohesion and energy and environmental risks at the top of this list of challenges. Innovative and creative capacities will be central to the skills that our young people and we ourselves must harness to address these challenges. These needs can be found at the core of the educational and learning choices up to 2050 identified by the Millennium Project experts.

The 1985 report on The Intelligence Revolution, as highlighted by Raymond Collard, is both distant from us in retroforesight terms and close to us in terms of the relevance of the long-term challenges it contains. In this respect, it fits powerfully and pertinently into our temporality. In the report, Thierry Gaudin and André-Yves Portnoff noted that setting creation in motion means sharing questions before answers and accepting uncertainty and drift. Dogmatism is no longer possible (…) as a result, utopia is evolving into realism. In the long term, humans are the safest bet [26].

Of course, betting on humans has to be the right decision. It is men and women who are hard at work, and who must remain so. This implies that they are capable of meeting the challenges, their own and also those of the society in which they operate. Technically. Mentally. Ethically.

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

[1] This text is a revised version of a speech made at the start of the HELMo 2018-2019 academic year, on 18 September 2018, on the subject of The jobs of tomorrow... A question of intelligence.

[2] The experts that attended the IFTF workshop in March 2017 estimated that around 85% of the jobs that today’s learners will be doing in 2030 haven’t been invented yet. This makes the famous prediction that 65% of grade school kids from 1999 will end up in jobs that haven’t yet been created seem conservative in comparison. The next era of Human/Machine Partnerships, Emerging Technologies, Impact on Society and Work in 2030, Palo Alto, Cal., Institute for the Future – DELL Technologies, 2017.

http://www.iftf.org/fileadmin/user_upload/downloads/th/SR1940_IFTFforDellTechnologies_Human-Machine_070717_readerhigh-res.pdf

[3] In particular, his best book: Jeremy RIFKIN, The End of Work, The Decline of the Global Labor Force and the Dawn of the PostMarket Era, New York, Tarcher, 1994.

[4] Chris ANDERSON, Makers, The New Industrial Revolution, New York, Crown Business, 2012.

[5] Dorothée KOHLER and Jean-Daniel WEISZ, Industrie 4.0, Les défis de la transformation numérique du modèle industriel allemand, p. 11, Paris, La Documentation française, 2016.

[6] François BOURDONCLE, La révolution Big Data, in Pierre VELTZ and Thierry WEIL, L’industrie, notre avenir, p. 64-69, Paris, Eyrolles-La Fabrique de l’Industrie, Colloque de Cerisy, 2015.

[7] Philippe DESTATTE, The New Industrial Paradigm, Keynote at The Industrial Materials Association (IMA-Europe) 20th Anniversary, IMAGINE event, Brussels, The Square, September 24th, 2014, Blog PhD2050, September 24, 2014.

https://phd2050.org/2014/09/26/nip/

[8] Thierry GEERTS, Digitalis, Comment réinventer le monde, Brussels, Racine, 2018.

[9] La Révolution de l’intelligence, Rapport sur l’état de la technique, Paris, Ministère de l’Industrie et de la Recherche, Sciences et Techniques Special Edition, October 1983.

[10] John NAISBITT, Megatrends, Ten New Directions Transforming our Lives, New York, Warner Book, 1982. – London and Sydney, Futura – Macdonald & Co, 1984.

[11] Alvin TOFFLER, The Third Wave, New York, William Morrow and Company, 1980.

[12] André-Yves PORTNOFF, Raymond Collard, un tisseur de liens, Note, Paris, 10 September 2018.

[13] Bertrand GILLE dir., Histoire des Techniques, Techniques et civilisations, Technique et sciences, Paris, Gallimard, 1978.

[14] Pierre LEBRUN, Marinette BRUWIER, Jan DHONDT and Georges HANSOTTE, Essai sur la Révolution industrielle en Belgique, 1770-1847, Brussels, Académie royale, 1981.

[15] Raymond COLLARD, Prospective 2007… sorties de la crise, transformations des modes de production, du travail et de l’emploi, dans La Wallonie au futur, Cahier n°2, p. 124, Charleroi, The Destree Institute, 1987.

http://www.wallonie-en-ligne.net/Wallonie-Futur-1_1987/WF1-CB05_Collard-R.htm

[16] R. COLLARD, Prospective 2007…, p. 124.

[17] This was his 1953 lecture. Martin HEIDEGGER, Essais et conférences, Paris, Gallimard, 1958. – Our translation.

[18] La Révolution de l’intelligence…, p. 182.

[19] La Révolution de l’intelligence…, p. 24.

[20] Didier VRANCKEN, L’histoire d’un double basculement, preface to D. VRANCKEN, Le crépuscule du social, Liège, Presses universitaires de Liège, 2014.

[21] Thierry GAUDIN, Les dieux intérieurs, Philosophie de l’innovation, Strasbourg, Koenigshoffen, Cohérence, 1985.

[22] Raymond COLLARD, Le Groupe permanent Recherche – développement de Louvain, p. 11, Brussels, Centre scientifique et Technique de la Construction (CSTC), 2000.

[23] Permanent Leuven Research and Development Group, 37th year, Peut-on industrialiser la créativité?, 2002. – François PERROUX, Industrie et création collective, t. 1, Saintsimonisme du XXe siècle et création collective, p. 166, Paris, Presses universitaires de France, 1964.

[24] http://www.millennium-project.org/

[25] Jerome GLENN, Results of the Education and Learning Real-Time Delphi that assessed 20 long-range actions to address future works-technology dynamics, Sept 2, 2018.

[26] La Révolution de l’intelligence…, p. 187.

Se référant à une étude de mars 2017 de l’Institute for the Future (Palo Alto, Californie), la Haute École libre mosane [1] rappelait, à l’occasion de sa rentrée académique 2018-2019, que 85 % des métiers de 2030 n’avaient pas encore été inventés [2]. L’équipe d’HELMo indiquait justement que le vieillissement de la population,
les changements climatiques et énergétiques, les migrations de masse et bien sûr, les technologies numériques, la robotisation et les autres progrès scientifiques sont autant de facteurs de changement qui bouleversent le monde dans sa globalité. Soulignant sa vocation professionnalisante, en tant que Haute École, elle se demandait si les métiers auxquels elle forme aujourd’hui existeront encore demain ? Dans le même temps, son directeur-président Alexandre Lodez, mais aussi le représentant du personnel enseignant, l’avocat Vincent Thiry et la déléguée des étudiants, insistaient sur le fait qu’HELMo ne souhaitait pas former uniquement des ressources humaines opérationnelles, en réponse à telle ou telle demande ponctuelle du marché
du travail, mais veut aussi former des citoyens responsables, capables d’évoluer tout au long de leur carrière et de leur vie. Toutes et tous posaient une question essentielle : quelles sont dès lors les compétences clés à renforcer ou à développer ?

J’essaierai d’y répondre en trois temps.

D’abord en évoquant les bouleversements du monde et leurs effets sur les métiers. Ensuite, en utilisant les résultats d’une enquête menée par des prospectivistes et experts du monde entier cet été 2018, et dont les résultats ont été synthétisés début septembre. Enfin, par une brève conclusion qui articule utopie et réalisme.

 

1. Les bouleversements du monde

Sur la question des transformations technico-économiques, nous pourrions entrer en matière en évoquant les multiples travaux contemporains qui en traitent, de Jeremy Rifkin [3] à Chris Anderson [4], de Dorothée Kohler et Jean-Daniel Weisz [5], à François Bourdoncle, Pierre Veltz ou Thierry Weil [6]. Nous pourrions également décrire le Nouveau Paradigme industriel [7]. Ou même, pour être dans l’actualité immédiate, faire appel à Thierry Geerts, patron de Google Belgique, dont l’ouvrage, Digitalis [8] est actuellement présent partout.

C’est plutôt à Raymond Collard que je me réfèrerai. Ancien professeur à l’Université de Namur, directeur général honoraire du Service des Études, de la Statistique et de l’Informatique au Ministère de la Région wallonne – l’actuel Service public de Wallonie -, coordinateur scientifique du Groupe permanente de Recherche et Développement de Louvain, Raymond Collard, qui était né en 1928, est mort à Jemeppe-sur-Meuse, dans l’indifférence de la Wallonie, le 8 juillet 2018. Ce n’est que par un courriel de mon collègue et ami André-Yves Portnoff du 13 septembre que j’ai appris, depuis Paris, son décès.

Le 15 mars 1985, j’avais été interpellé par un article dans le journal La Wallonie. Le titre de ce papier signé Raymond Collard était provocateur : On cherche des pionniers wallons ! Mais la question était précise, et pourrait être reposée trente-trois ans plus tard : Y a-t-il parmi les lecteurs de ce journal des hommes et des femmes qui peuvent identifier en Wallonie des entreprises petites ou grandes qui vivent réellement selon les principes de la « révolution de l’intelligence ? Le papier faisait référence à la présentation à Paris, du rapport élaboré par une équipe pilotée de prospectivistes : d’après le rapport sur l’état de la technique, nous assistons à l’avènement, non pas de la société de l’information, comme on le dit souvent, notamment au Japon, mais de la « société de création », dont la ressource essentielle est l’intelligence, le talent, et non plus le capital. C’est aussi pourquoi l’on parle de la révolution de l’intelligence, une révolution qui impose la mobilisation des intelligences, mobilisation qui ne peut pas s’effectuer par la contrainte. Les relations habituelles entre le pouvoir et les talents sont modifiés à tous les niveaux. […], c’est-à-dire qui s’efforcent avant tout de mobiliser toutes les intelligences et les énergies de leurs travailleurs et de leurs cadres [9].

Le rapport lui-même, intitulé La Révolution de l’intelligence [10], complétait bien mes lectures des travaux de John Naisbitt [11] ou d’Alvin Toffler [12]. Il était largement décrit par Raymond Collard. Ce tisseur de liens, comme l’a appelé André-Yves Portnoff [13] s’était déplacé à Paris pour la présentation du document par Thierry Gaudin, ingénieur des Ponts et chef du Centre de Prospective et d’Évaluation au Ministère français de la Recherche et Portnoff, alors rédacteur en chef de Sciences et Techniques, édité par la Société des Ingénieurs et Scientifiques de France. Le ministre de la Recherche et de la Technologie, Hubert Currien, ainsi que la ministre du Redéploiement industriel et du Commerce extérieur assistaient à l’événement. Tous deux étaient membres du Gouvernement de Laurent Fabius, sous la présidence de la République de François Mitterrand. Il ne faut pas s’étonner de cette double présence ministérielle puisque le Centre de Prospective et d’Évaluation (CPE) était un service commun à ces deux ministères.

S-T_Revolution-Intelligence_1985

Ce rapport, après l’avoir recherché, puis photocopié en bibliothèque, je l’ai littéralement dévoré, – et depuis acquis sur eBay. Il appelle en 2018 un premier message clair : les bouleversements que nous connaissons aujourd’hui ne sont pas neufs, même s’ils nous paraissent monter en puissance. Les mutations en cours, la Révolution cognitive est en œuvre depuis le début des années 1970 et elle va se poursuivre encore pendant quelques décennies, ce qui constitue un autre message de Thierry Gaudin.

Je n’en étais pas étonné hier, comme je ne suis pas étonné aujourd’hui. Le cadre conceptuel de l’évolution du système technique emmenant avec lui une mutation généralisée de tous les domaines de la société était, est celui que je connaissais. Il m’avait été enseigné à l’Université de Liège par le Professeur Pierre Lebrun, – historien et économiste, esprit brillant et mordant dont j’allais écouter la parole aiguisée, comme on va entendre quelque flibustier sur le port. Ce cadre conceptuel, je l’avais enseigné à mes étudiants aux Rivageois (Haute École Charlemagne) et à l’Athénée de Liège 2, et je l’enseigne toujours à l’Université de Mons, ou même à Paris. Ce qui constitue un juste retour.

Le modèle d’analyse en a été conceptualisé par Bertrand Gille, historien des techniques, professeur à l’École pratique des Hautes Études à Paris. Le directeur de la remarquable Histoire des Techniques dans L’Encyclopédie de La Pléade, chez Gallimard [14], y a bien montré que ce sont la conjonction de l’évolution rapide des niveaux de formation des populations et la diffusion des connaissances scientifiques et techniques qui ont constitué le moteur du progrès technique permettant la Révolution industrielle machiniste. On ne s’étonnera pas que Bertrand Gille fût aussi l’ancien maître du professeur Robert Halleux, lui-même fondateur du Centre d’Histoire des Sciences et des Techniques de l’Université de Liège. Ainsi, Bertrand Gille a-t-il marqué plusieurs générations de chercheurs, historiens et prospectivistes, certains ne s’adonnant qu’à une des tâches, d’autres à l’autre, d’autres encore, aux deux.

Ce modèle, revu par Jacques Ellul et Thierry Gaudin conçoit que, au système technique médiéval, mis en évidence par Fernand Braudel, Georges Duby et Emmanuel Leroy Ladurie, correspond un système technique industriel, moteur et produit d’une Révolution industrielle, décrit par Pierre Lebrun, Marinette Bruwier et quelques autres [15], et enfin, un système technique en développement, en construction, porteur de la Révolution de l’intelligence, loin d’être terminée. La terre était centrale dans la première, le capital dans la seconde, la troisième repose sur l’esprit des femmes et des hommes. À chaque fois, ce sont les matériaux, l’énergie, la relation avec le vivant et le temps qui sont sollicités.

En 1985, Raymond Collard nous explique ce qu’il a bien compris du rapport de Gaudin et Portnoff et des centaines de chercheurs qu’ils ont mobilisés : l’importance des quatre grandes mutations dans les pôles qui restructurent la société :

– l’hyperchoix des matériaux et leur percolation horizontale, allant des usages dans les secteurs de pointes aux utilisations les plus usuelles ;

– la tension entre la puissance de l’énergie électrique nucléaire et l’économie des ressources énergétiques, dans un contexte de recyclage ;

– la relation avec le vivant et l’immense domaine des biotechnologies, y compris la génétique ;

– la nouvelle structure du temps, rythmé en nanosecondes par les microprocesseurs.

Raymond Collard détaillera un peu plus tard tout cela dans une remarquable communication au Premier Congrès La Wallonie au futur à Charleroi, en octobre 1987, intitulée : Prospective 2007… sorties de la crise, transformations des modes de production du travail et de l’emploi, toujours en ligne sur le site de l’Institut Destrée [16]. Le professeur aux Facultés des Sciences économiques et sociales de Namur y notait que : on a pu écrire que la microélectronique intellectualisait l’industrie. Nous vivons une révolution industrielle que l’on peut qualifier de « révolution de l’intelligence ». Le dévelop­pement des possibilités ouvertes par les progrès fulgurants de la microélectronique a ouvert des champs immenses à l’informatique. Demain, on utilisera davantage l’intelligence artificielle, qui se manifestera partout avec la mise en place des ordinateurs de la cinquième génération [17].

 Le rapport du CPE de 1985 reste une mine pour celui qui veut décrypter les changements en cours, par un regard à la fois rétroprospectif – considérer des avenirs qui n’ont pas eu lieu – et prospectif – envisager les avenirs possibles pour construire un futur souhaitable. On peut en tirer quelques préceptes, fondamentalement utiles pour les établissements d’enseignement supérieur, mais aussi pour nos entreprises. En voici, parmi d’autres, pour nous pousser à réfléchir :

« l’expérience montre que les techniques nouvelles ne s’introduisent harmonieusement que si la formation n’arrive pas après les machines » (p. 15).

« il n’est plus possible de développer la qualité sans confier à chacun le contrôle de son propre travail » (p. 15).

« ne donner la parole qu’à la direction, c’est gaspiller 99% des ressources intellectuelles de l’entreprise » ou de l’organisation. (…) La mobilisation de toutes les intelligences devient indispensable (p. 42).

« l’entreprise qui réussit est celle qui parvient à mobiliser le mieux l’imagination, l’intelligence, la volonté de son personnel » (45).

« la nouvelle source de puissance n’est plus le capital détenu par certains, mais l’information détenue par beaucoup« . Citation tirée des travaux de John Naisbitt (p. 45).

Mais le texte montre surtout, avec le philosophe allemand Martin Heidegger, que l’essence de la technique n’est rien de technique [18]. Tout dans la technique a d’abord été rêvé par l’homme, et ce qui a réussi a été en outre accepté par la société des hommes, rappelle le rapport [19]. Car ce rapport sur l’état de la technique est aussi une leçon de prospective. Il nous rappelle, précisément par la rétroprospective, qu’on n’anticipe que très mal ce qui n’existe pas déjà. Bien entendu, comme le répétait Gaston Berger, le futur n’existe pas comme objet de connaissance. Il n’existe que comme terrain de conquête, de volonté, de stratégie. C’est l’espace, avec le présent, où on peut innover et créer.

C’est souvent à tort que nous pensons que les technologies vont trouver très vite, voire tout de suite, leur application. Interrogé en février 1970 sur 1980, l’écrivain Arthur Koestler, auteur de Le Zéro et l’infini, voyait – comme nous aujourd’hui – nos maisons peuplées de robots domestiques programmés chaque matin. Il imaginait des mini-voitures électriques dans les cœurs de villes interdits à toute autre circulation. Il pensait que des communications télématiques permettraient, en 1980, de nous parler constamment en vidéo pour éviter les déplacements. Interrogé au même moment, le grand prospectiviste américain Herman Kahn, cofondateur de l’Hudson Institute, imaginait qu’en 1980, l’enseignement serait assisté par des ordinateurs qui joueraient auprès des enfants un rôle d’éducation équivalent à celui que remplissaient leurs parents et leurs professeurs [20].

Le monde poursuit sa mutation, porté, mais contraint aussi, par les quatre pôles. La transition nous interpelle et nous essayons de faire mine de la contrôler, même si nous n’avons aucune idée de que nous trouverons lors de sa phase de consolidation, quelque part au XXIIe siècle.

Quels métiers survivront à ces bouleversements ? Cette prospective des métiers et des qualifications est délicate. Il s’agit à la fois de discerner les évolutions de l’emploi et des métiers alors que le marché du travail se transforme, que les organisations mutent et que l’environnement, l’écosystème économique, se modifie. Mais il s’agit aussi de prendre en compte les parcours de vie possibles des apprenants dans cette société en mutation [21], d’anticiper les besoins en compétences, de mesurer le renouvellement de la main-d’œuvre.

Ce que nous avons montré également, en travaillant avec les instances bassins, enseignement qualifiant et formation, c’est que, c’est souvent au niveau micro et territorial que l’on peut anticiper, les territoires de projet paraissant appelés à constituer, à l’avenir de dix à quinze ans au plus tard, les lieux d’interaction et de mise en œuvre des politiques (re)mariées d’enseignement et de formation, et donc de transformation de notre société. Avec plus ou moins de décentralisation, de déconcentration, de délégation, de contractualisation, ou d’autonomie des acteurs. C’est probablement ce dernier cadre qui sera le plus créatif et le plus innovant et sur lequel nous devons progresser. Cela demande tant des visions européennes, fédérales, régionales et territoriales par bassin, réconciliatrices et mobilisatrices.

En animant le Groupe permanent de Recherche-Développement de Louvain depuis le milieu des années 1960, avec notamment l’appui de Philippe le Hodey, de Michel Woitrin et le concours du Professeur Philippe de Woot, Raymond Collard avait réussi à mettre en place et à faire fonctionner une véritable plateforme telle que la Commission européenne le préconise aujourd’hui. Se référant encore et toujours à Thierry Gaudin, il notait en 2000 que comprendre l’innovation c’est prendre la technique, non pas dans ce qui est déjà là, mais dans le dévoilement de ce qui n’est pas encore là [22]. Et si Raymond Collard reconnaissait que cela demandait de nombreux efforts en R&D, il remarquait que cela ne suffisait pas : acte de création que le marché est appelé à confirmer, l’innovation résulte d’un processus interdisciplinaire et interactif, fait à la fois d’interactions internes à l’entreprise elle-même et de l’entreprise avec son environnement, tout particulièrement dans la « conquête » et la gestion des savoirs et des compétences [23]. Avec, au cœur de sa démarche, l’idée, chère à François Perroux et mise en exergue par les travaux du GRD de Louvain en 2002, qu’un esprit est créateur s’il est tout ensemble, ouvert, propre à combiner ce qu’il accueille et à trouver de nouveaux schèmes combinatoires [24].

Nul doute que cette pensée reste, et restera féconde…

2. Prospective : de l’innovation technologique à l’innovation pédagogique

Tout comme l’historien, le prospectiviste ne peut travailler sans matière première, sans source. Pour ce dernier, l’intelligence collective constitue le véritable carburant de sa capacité d’innovation.

À cet effet, l’Institut Destrée a rejoint, en 2000, le Millennium Project. Ce réseau mondial de recherches et d’études prospectives a été fondé en 1996 à Washington par le Conseil américain pour l’Université des Nations Unies, avec l’objectif d’améliorer les perspectives futures de l’humanité. Il s’agit d’un think tank participatif global, organisé en plus de soixante nœuds (Nodes), eux-mêmes têtes de réseaux, et réunissant des universités, des entreprises et des centres de recherche privés et publics. L’Institut Destrée y représente depuis 2002 le Nœud de l’Aire de Bruxelles (Brussels’ Area Node) qui se veut transfrontalier et connecté avec les institutions européennes [25].

En préparation d’une large étude intitulée L’avenir du Travail par rapport à la Technologie à l’horizon 2050 (Future Work/Technology 2050), le Comité de Programmation (Planning Committee) du Millennium Project a rédigé des scénarios globaux et fait réagir à ceux-ci environ 450 prospectivistes et autres chercheurs ou acteurs. Une série de séminaires ont été organisés dans vingt pays afin d’identifier des enjeux et d’y répondre par des stratégies adaptées. C’est sur cette base qu’une série de consultations d’experts en temps réels (Real-Time Delphi) ont été organisées sur les questions d’éducation et d’apprentissage, de gouvernement et de gouvernance, d’entreprises et de travail, de culture et d’art ainsi que de science et technologie. À partir d’un ensemble de 250 actions identifiées, 20 ont été sélectionnées par le panel d’experts dans le domaine de l’éducation et de l’apprentissage.

Voici la liste complète des 20 actions. Je les ai ordonnées, en tout cas pour les cinq premières, en fonction du niveau de leur pertinence – à la fois efficacité et faisabilité -, telles qu’elles ont été classées par le panel international.

La première dans ce classement porte sur les axes de l’éducation. Il s’agit de :

4. Mettre davantage l’accent sur le développement de la créativité, la pensée critique, les relations humaines, la philosophie, l’entrepreneuriat (individuel et en équipe), l’art, le travail indépendant, l’harmonie sociale, l’éthique et les valeurs, de se connaître pour construire et mener une vie active pleine de sens, avec une auto-évaluation des progrès réalisés sur ses propres buts et objectifs (comme la Finlande le met en œuvre).

La deuxième ravit l’enseignant en prospective, puisqu’il s’agit de :

20. Faire une place aux études du futur dans les programmes comme nous le faisons pour l’histoire. Enseigner des visions alternatives du futur, la prospective, et la capacité à évaluer les futurs possibles.

La troisième action est une mesure de cohésion sociale :

6. Rendre la télé-éducation gratuite partout ; et les systèmes d’apprentissage tout au long de la vie omniprésents.

La quatrième m’apparaît probablement la plus importante sur le plan opérationnel :

2. Orienter davantage les systèmes d’éducation et d’apprentissage vers la maîtrise de compétences plutôt que vers la maîtrise d’une profession.

La cinquième est profondément transformatrice du système :

3. Parallèlement au rôle de la science, des technologies, de l’ingénierie, des arts et des mathématiques (STEM / STEAM), créer un système hybride d’autoapprentissage, basé sur la recherche et la réalisation de soi ; transformer les enseignants en coaches / entraîneurs, utilisant de nouveaux outils d’intelligence artificielle avec les étudiants. Les 15 autres actions sont ici livrées sans hiérarchie, certaines raisonnant avec des initiatives de terrain, notamment au niveau du Pôle académique Liège-Luxembourg :

1. Faire de l’intelligence individuelle un objectif national de l’éducation (quelle que soit la définition de l’intelligence choisie par un pays, l’augmenter constituerait un objectif national).

5. Mettre continuellement à jour la manière dont nous enseignons et comment nous apprenons des nouvelles connaissances sur les neurosciences.

7. Unifier les universités et les centres de formation professionnelle et renforcer la coopération entre les écoles et les projets extérieurs de bien public.

8. Utiliser des robots et de l’intelligence artificielle en éducation.

9. Se concentrer sur les technologies exponentielles (exponential technologies [26]) et l’esprit d’entreprendre.

10. Changer de programme à tous les niveaux pour normaliser le travail indépendant.

11. Former les conseillers d’orientation à être plus tournés vers l’avenir dans les écoles.

12. Partager la responsabilité de la parentalité en tant que communauté éducative.

13. Promouvoir des «communautés de pratique» qui cherchent continuellement à améliorer les systèmes d’apprentissage.

14. Intégrer l’apprentissage basé sur la simulation en utilisant des environnements multijoueurs.

15. Inclure l’apprentissage des problèmes de sécurité liés à la technologie d’enseignement (et d’apprentissage).

16. Intégrer les systèmes d’information qui existent sur le marché du travail dans les systèmes d’éducation et d’emploi.

17. Le gouvernement, les employeurs de tous les secteurs industriels et les syndicats devraient coopérer pour créer des modèles adéquats d’apprentissage tout au long de la vie.

18. Créer des systèmes d’apprentissage de la naissance à trois ans ; c’est la phase clé pour développer la créativité, la personnalité.

19. Créer des campagnes de sensibilisation de masse avec des célébrités sur les actions à entreprendre pour résoudre les problèmes liés aux grandes transitions à travers le monde [27].

On mesure que toutes ces actions n’ont pas la même pertinence, le même statut, le même impact potentiel. C’est pour cette raison que les cinq premières ont été mises en exergue. La plupart s’inscrivent toutefois dans une logique volontariste d’accroissement de nos capacités d’éducation et d’émancipation des femmes et des hommes. Le fait qu’elles aient été pensées sur tous les continents, par des acteurs hétérogènes, avec une réelle convergence de pensée, n’est certainement pas indifférent.

3. Conclusion : à long terme, les paris sur l’être humain sont les plus sûrs

Pour la Wallonie, comme pour Liège en particulier, nous savons la nécessité de créer collectivement de la valeur dans le but de pouvoir nous rendre autonomes, ainsi que d’être sûrs de pouvoir faire face aux défis de l’avenir. Aux premiers rangs de ceux-ci, il n’est nul doute que nous devons placer la cohésion sociale et les risques énergétiques et environnementaux. Les capacités d’innovation et de créativité seront au centre des compétences que nos jeunes et nous-mêmes devrons mobiliser pour y faire face. Nous avons retrouvé ces nécessités au centre des choix d’éducation et d’apprentissage à l’horizon 2050 pour les experts du Millennium Project.

Le rapport de 1985 sur La Révolution de l’Intelligence, tel que valorisé par Raymond Collard, nous est à la fois lointain par l’horizon rétroprospectif et proche par l’actualité des enjeux de long terme qu’il contenait. En cela, il s’inscrit puissamment et avec pertinence dans notre temporalité. Thierry Gaudin et André-Yves Portnoff y notaient que, mettre en mouvement la création, c’est partager les questions avant les réponses, accepter l’incertitude et le mouvement. Aucun dogmatisme n’est plus possible (…) dès lors, l’utopie se mue en réalisme. À long terme, les paris sur l’être humain sont les plus sûrs [28].

Bien sûr que parier sur l’être humain ne peut constituer que le bon choix. C’est lui, c’est elle, qui est à la manœuvre, qui doit le rester. Ce qui implique qu’ils soient à la hauteur des défis, les leurs, mais aussi ceux de la société dans laquelle ils évoluent. Techniquement. Mentalement. Éthiquement.

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

 

[1] Ce texte constitue une mise au net d’une intervention faite à l’occasion de la rentrée académique 2018-2019 d’HELMo, le 18 septembre 2018 sur le thème Les métiers de demain… Question d’intelligence(s).

[2] The experts that attended the IFTF workshop in March 2017 estimated that around 85% of the jobs that today’s learners will be doing in 2030 haven’t been invented yet. This makes the famous prediction that 65% of grade school kids from 1999 will end up in jobs that haven’t yet been created seem conservative in comparison. The next era of Human / Machine Partnerships, Emerging Technologies, Impact on Society and Work in 2030, Palo Alto, Cal., Institute for the Future – DELL Technologies, 2017.

http://www.iftf.org/fileadmin/user_upload/downloads/th/SR1940_IFTFforDellTechnologies_Human-Machine_070717_readerhigh-res.pdf

[3] En particulier, son meilleur livre : Jeremy RIFKIN, The End of Work, The Decline of the Global Labor Force and the Dawn of the PostMarket Era, New York, Tarcher, 1994.

[4] Chris ANDERSON, Makers, The New Industrial Revolution, New York, Crown Business, 2012.

[5] Dorothée KOHLER et Jean-Daniel WEISZ, Industrie 4.0, Les défis de la transformation numérique du modèle industriel allemand, p. 11, Paris, La Documentation française, 2016.

[6] François BOURDONCLE, La révolution Big Data, dans Pierre VELTZ et Thierry WEIL, L’industrie, notre avenir, p. 64-69, Paris, Eyrolles-La Fabrique de l’Industrie, Colloque de Cerisy, 2015.

[7] Philippe DESTATTE, Le Nouveau Paradigme industriel : une grille de lecture, Blog PhD2050, 19 octobre 2014. https://phd2050.org/2014/10/19/npi/

[8] Thierry GEERTS, Digitalis, Comment réinventer le monde, Bruxelles, Racine, 2018.

[9] Raymond COLLARD, On cherche des pionniers wallons !, dans La Wallonie, 15 mars 1985, p. 10. – R. COLLARD, Sciences, techniques et entreprises, Qu’attendre des entreprises wallonnes ? dans La Wallonie, 4 avril 1985, p. 10.

[10] La Révolution de l’intelligence, Rapport sur l’état de la technique, Paris, Ministère de l’Industrie et de la Recherche, Numéro Spécial de Sciences et Techniques, Octobre 1983.

[11] John NAISBITT, Megatrends, Ten New Directions Transforming our Lives, New York, Warner Book, 1982. – London and Sydney, Futura – Macdonald & Co, 1984. – Edition française : Les dix commandements de l’avenir, Paris-Montréal, Sand-Primeur, 1982.

[12] Alvin TOFFLER, The Third Wave, New York, William Morrow and Company, 1980. – Edition française : La Troisième vague, Paris, Denoël, 1980.

[13] André-Yves PORTNOFF, Raymond Collard, un tisseur de liens, Note, Paris, 10 septembre 2018.

[14] Bertrand GILLE dir., Histoire des Techniques, Techniques et civilisations, Technique et sciences, Paris, Gallimard, 1978.

[15] Pierre LEBRUN, Marinette BRUWIER, Jan DHONDT et Georges HANSOTTE, Essai sur la Révolution industrielle en Belgique, 1770-1847, Bruxelles, Académie royale, 1981.

[16] Raymond COLLARD, Prospective 2007… sorties de la crise, transformations des modes de production, du travail et de l’emploi, dans La Wallonie au futur, Cahier n°2, p. 124.Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 1987.

http://www.wallonie-en-ligne.net/Wallonie-Futur-1_1987/WF1-CB05_Collard-R.htm

[17] Raymond COLLARD, Prospective 2007… sorties de la crise, transformations des modes de production, du travail et de l’emploi, dans La Wallonie au futur, Cahier n°2, p. 124.Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 1987.

[18] Il s’agit de sa conférence de 1953. Martin HEIDEGGER, Essais et conférences, Paris, Gallimard, 1958.

[19] La Révolution de l’intelligence…, p. 182.

[20] La Révolution de l’intelligence…, p. 24.

[21] Didier VRANCKEN, L’histoire d’un double basculement, préface à D. VRANCKEN, Le crépuscule du social, Liège, Presses universitaires de Liège, 2014.

[22] Thierry GAUDIN, Les dieux intérieurs, Philosophie de l’innovation, Strasbourg, Koenigshoffen, Cohérence, 1985.

[23] Raymond COLLARD, Le Groupe permanent Recherche – développement de Louvain, p. 11, Bruxelles, Centre scientifique et Technique de la Construction (CSTC), 2000.

[24] Groupe permanent de Recherche-Développement de Louvain, 37e année, Peut-on industrialiser la créativité ?, 2002. – François PERROUX, Industrie et création collective, t. 1, Saintsimonisme du XXe siècle et création collective, p. 166, Paris, Presses universitaires de France, 1964.

[25] http://www.millennium-project.org/

[26] Voir par exemple : Tech Trends 2018, Exponential technology watch list: Innovation opportunities on the horizon, , Deloitte, Dec. 2017. https://www2.deloitte.com/insights/us/en/focus/tech-trends/2018/exponential-technology-digital-innovation.html

[27] Jerome GLENN, Results of the Education and Learning Real-Time Delphi that assessed 20 long-range actions to address future works-technology dynamics, Sept 2, 2018.

[28] La Révolution de l’intelligence…, p. 187.