archive

Archives de Tag: Michel Godet

Namur (Wallonia), August 28, 2021

Anticipating means visualising and then acting before the events or actions occur. This implies taking action based on what is visualised, which just goes to show how complex the process is and how problematic our relationship is with the future. The saying “to govern means to foresee » is at odds with this complexity principle. It also refers to individual responsibility. Blaming politics is a little simplistic and unfair, as it is up to each of us to govern ourselves, which means we must “anticipate”. Yet we are constantly guilty of not anticipating in our daily lives.

 

1. Our relationship with the future

 Our relationship with the future is problematic. There are five different attitudes, of which anticipation is merely the fifth. The first is common: we go with the flow; in other words, we wait for things to happen. We hope everything will go well. It is business as usual, or we have always done this as they say in Wallonia. We can also echo the words used by the miners whenever the colliery tunnels were shored up: it can’t hurt, it’s not dangerous, it’s strong, it’s reliable, etc. My father taught me to ridicule this cavalier attitude and, above all, to challenge it.

The second attitude is more active: it involves playing by the rules and working within the norms. The elected officials pay close attention to this, and so do we all. We have to have an extinguisher in our car in case of fire, but mostly to comply with the legal obligations, regulations, technical checks, and so on. Note that public buildings and businesses are also required to have them and to ensure that they are checked regularly. Very few people have one or more fire extinguishers in their house or apartment, and, even if they do, they may not be in working order or suitable for the different types of fire that may occur. We know that it is not a legal requirement, so most people don’t bother about it.

The third attitude towards the future is responsiveness: we respond to external stimuli, and we adapt quickly to the situations that arise. Images of firefighters and emergency workers come to mind, of course, and entrepreneurs as well. Responsiveness may be a virtue, but we know that it is sometimes ineffective in the face of fast-moving events. In defence of their discipline, futurists often quote a saying which they attribute to the statesman Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord (1754-1838): when it’s urgent, it’s already too late.

The fourth attitude towards the future is preactivity: our ability – or lack of – to prepare for changes once they are foreseeable. The word foreseeable is clearly related to forecasting, in other words, an assumption is made about the future which is usually quantified and associated with a confidence index based on an expectation. This involves taking a number of variables and system elements into account against a background of previous structural stability and analysing them and their possible evolutions. The likelihood of these possible evolutions is then calculated. Validation is always uncertain due to the complexity of the systems created by the variables. A common example is the weather forecast: it gives me a probability of rain at a given time. If I am preactive, I take my umbrella or I pile sandbags in front of my doors.

The fifth attitude towards the future is proactivity. In his work on the Battle of Stalingrad – 55 years after the event –, British historian and former officer Antony Beevor criticises the German general Friedrich Paulus (1890-1957) for not, as the military commander, being prepared to confront the threat of encirclement which had been facing him for weeks, particularly by not retaining a strong, mobile, armoured capability. This would have enabled the Sixth Army of the Wehrmacht to defend itself effectively at the crucial moment. But, Beevor adds, that implied a clear assessment of the actual danger [1]. This means that, faced with expected and identified changes (I would say exploratory foresight), or even desired changes, which I will cause or create (I would then say normative foresight), I will take action. Anticipating means both visualising and then acting in advance, in other words, acting before the events or actions occur. That is why we could also say, with Riel Miller, that if the future does not exist in the present, anticipation does. The form the future takes in the present is anticipation [2].

 

2. A threefold problem to comprehend the future

We are all faced with a threefold problem when confronting the future. The first problem is that, in the tradition of Gaston Berger (1896-1960) [3], we are expected to look far ahead but, in reality, the future does not exist as an object of knowledge. Clearly, it does not exist because it is not written and is not determined, as Marx believed or as some collapse theorists today believe.

We are also expected to take a broad view and to reflect systemically. But forecasts only focus on a limited number of variables, even in the era of Big Data. Yet we find ourselves faced with systems which are all complex and interwoven in a tangle of unlikely events. We are all familiar with emergences [4] or sudden occurrences linked to the relationships between participants and factors within the system. When driving my car, I can anticipate a puddle, to avoid aquaplaning, or a patch of ice by telling myself that I must not break. But, in reality, I never know what my reaction will be when I feel my wheels shaking, or how my car, my tyres or the road surface will react. Similarly, I never know what the reaction will be of the drivers in front of me or behind me, or in the other lanes, or of the bird that happens to strike my windscreen at that precise moment. So, I have to deal with the complexity, but I cannot reduce it.

The third problem is that, faced with world systems of such complexity, my own knowledge tools are limited. We are trained in disciplines, epistemologies, knowledge methods, vocabularies, and scientific jargon which do not encourage multidisciplinarity (studying one discipline through several disciplines), interdisciplinarity (transferring methods from one discipline to another) or transdisciplinarity (a demanding approach which moves between, across and beyond disciplines), to echo the distinctions expressed by the Franco-Romanian physicist Basarab Nicolescu in response to the works of Jean Piaget (1896-1980) [5]. Our narrowmindedness and reluctance to open up affect our humility, encourage received ideas, create ambiguity (words do not have the same meanings), prevent the necessary constructive dialogue, and adversely affect collective intelligence.

A key achievement of the French economists and futurists Jacques Lesourne (1928-2020) and Michel Godet was to demonstrate the limits of forecasting, which looks to the past for invariants or relationship models to suggest its permanence or its relatively constant evolution in the future, leading to conditional forecasts: ceteris paribus, all things being equal”. Michel Godet’s major work is entitled The Crisis in Forecasting and the Emergence of the « La Prospective », (Pergamon, 1979). In it, he writes that it was on account of the philosopher Gaston Berger, who was himself nurtured on the reflections of Teilhard de Chardin (1881-1955) and Maurice Blondel (1861-1949), and numerous Anglo-Saxon sources of inspiration, that the foresight approach developed. This intellectual stance involves taking the past and future into consideration over the long-term, comprehending the entire system in a seamless way, and exploring capabilities and means of action collectively.

Against our cultural, mental, intellectual, scientific, social and political background, this approach is not encouraged. It does, however, move us on from the question “what is going to happen” to the question “what may happen” and, therefore, “what if?”. This is also linked to one of our major preoccupations: the short-, medium-, and long-term impact prior analysis of the decisions we take.

Foresight has developed methods based precisely on the issue of these emergences. In addition to analysing trends and trajectories – which can identify crises such as the global financial crash in 2008 –, it also works with wildcards: major surprises and unexpected, remarkable, and unlikely events, which may have significant impacts if they occur: the 9/11 attacks, the Icelandic volcano in April 2010, the Covid crisis in 2019, the floods in July 2021, and so on.

There is also much talk today of black swan events as a result of the work of Nassim Nicholas Taleb, formerly a trader and now professor of risk engineering at the University of New York. This involves identifying events that are statistically almost impossible – so-called statistical dissonance – but which happen anyway [6].

 

3. Constructing a political agenda for complexity

First of all, we must be sceptical about the retrospective biases highlighted by the economist, psychologist and future Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman and his colleague Amos Tversky, which involve exaggerating, retrospectively, the fact that events could have been anticipated. These biases are linked to the need we all have to make sense of things, including the most random events [7]. When the unpredictable happens, it is intellectually quite easy for us to see it as predictable.

Next, it should be noted that political leaders are faced with the core issues of appropriation, legitimacy, and acceptability – especially budgetary – of a decision taken at the end of a dialogue and negotiation process involving multiple participants. The public will not necessarily be in favour of the government spending significant amounts on understanding problems they cannot yet visualise. Like St. Thomas, if they can’t touch it, they won’t believe it. At the outset, the population is not ready to hear what the politicians have to tell them on the matter, whether it involves a “stop-concrete” strategy or a perishable supply of masks. For experts and elected officials alike, it is no longer enough to make claims. They now have to provide scientific proof, and, above all, avoid denial, as the emotional link can be considerable. The significant role played by the media should also not be overlooked. For a long time, it was thought that a pandemic was an acceptable risk, as in the 1960s with the Hong Kong flu which caused at least a million deaths globally between 1968 and 1970, whereas the sight of Covid-19 victims in intensive care is unbearable and makes us less willing to accept the number of deaths. Remember how, in France, Health Minister Roselyne Bachelot was criticised and accused of squandering public money when she bought health masks and vaccines for swine flu (H1N1 virus) in 2009-2010. At the same time, humans have a great capacity to become accustomed to risk. Think of the nuclear sword of Damocles that was the Cold War, which continued until the early 1990s. We should also question whether this military nuclear risk – the anthropic apocalypse – has disappeared.

We constantly find ourselves needing to agree on the priority of the challenges facing us. Constructing a political agenda for such complexity is by no means clear, and political leaders wonder whether they will be criticised for starting works that may not seem urgent or sufficiently important to merit sustained attention, stakeholder mobilisation, and the resulting budgets.

Finally, governing not only means solving organisational problems, allocating resources and planning actions over time. It also means making things intelligible, as the French historian Pierre Rosanvallon points out [8]. The political world does not appreciate the importance of the educational aspect. In Belgium, politicians no longer go on television to talk to people directly and explain an issue that needs to be addressed. Government communications have disappeared; now, there are only televised addresses from the Head of State, who in this way becomes the last actor to communicate values to the public in this way.

 

Conclusion: uncertainty, responsibility, and anticipation

In May 2020, during the Covid-19 lockdown, the host of Signes des Temps on France-Culture radio, Marc Weitzmann, had the bright idea of recalling the first major debate of the Age of Enlightenment on natural disasters and their consequences for human populations [9], a debate between Voltaire (1694-1778) and Rousseau (1712-1778) about the Lisbon disaster of 1755 [10].

HRP5XD Lisbon Tsunami, 1755 – Woodcut – The Granger – NYC

On 1 November 1755 (All Saints Day), Lisbon was hit by a huge earthquake. Three successive waves between 5 and 15 metres high destroyed the port and the city centre [11], and tens of thousands of inhabitants lost their lives in the earthquake, tsunami and huge fire that followed. When he heard the news, Voltaire was deeply affected and, several weeks later, in view of the gravity of the event, he wrote a famous poem in which his intention was to go beyond mere evocation of the disaster and compassion for the victims.

Come, ye philosophers, who cry, “All’s well,”

And contemplate this ruin of a world.

Behold these shreds and cinders of your race,

This child and mother heaped in common wreck,

These scattered limbs beneath the marble shafts—

A hundred thousand whom the earth devours,

Who, torn and bloody, palpitating yet,

Entombed beneath their hospitable roofs,

In racking torment end their stricken lives.

To those expiring murmurs of distress,

To that appalling spectacle of woe,

Will ye reply: “You do but illustrate

The iron laws that chain the will of God »? [12]

In this “Poem on the Lisbon disaster”, from which these lines are a short excerpt, Voltaire ponders the appropriateness of attributing the event to divine justice, when, according to some so-called optimistic philosophers at the time, everything natural is a gift from God and, therefore, ultimately good and just [13]. Without calling divine power into question, Voltaire counters this concept, rejects the idea of a specific celestial punishment to atone for vices in the Portuguese capital, and instead declares fate responsible for the disaster.

As mentioned by Jean-Paul Deléage, who, in 2005, published in the Écologie et Politique review the letter which Rousseau sent to Voltaire on 18 August 1756, Voltaire went on to propose a new concept of human responsibility. This concept was social and political rather than metaphysical and religious. Thus, in his reply to Voltaire, Rousseau states as follows:

 (…), I believe I have shown that with the exception of death, which is an evil almost solely because of the preparations which one makes preceding it, most of our physical ills are still our own work. Is it not known that the person of each man has become the least part of himself, and that it is almost not worth the trouble of saving it when one has lost all the rest Without departing from your subject of Lisbon, admit, for example, that nature did not construct twenty thousand houses of six to seven stories there, and that if the inhabitants of this great city had been more equally spread out and more lightly lodged, the damage would have been much less, and perhaps of no account. All would have fled at the first disturbance, and the next day they would have been seen twenty leagues from there, as gay as if nothing had happened; but it is necessary to remain, to be obstinate around some hovels, to expose oneself to new quakes, because what one leaves behind is worth more than what one can bring along. How many unfortunate people have perished in this disaster because of one wanting to take his clothes, another his papers, another his money?  Is it not known that the person of each man has become the least part of himself, and that it is almost not worth the trouble of saving it when one has lost all the rest? [14] 

Whereas, for Voltaire, the Lisbon disaster was an accident and an unfortunate combination of circumstances, Rousseau feels that the natural seismic effects were compounded by the actions, urban choices and attitude of the people during the disaster. It is the responsibility of human behaviour that Rousseau highlights. In essence, he believes that, although Lisbon was destroyed, this was linked to the human decision to build a city on the coast and near a fault line. A lack of anticipation, perhaps.

Rousseau returned to these matters in his Confessions, in which he again absolves Providence and maintains that, of all the evils in people’s lives, there was not one to be attributed to Providence, and which had not its source rather in the abusive use man made of his faculties than in nature [15].

In the appropriately named Signes des Temps, or Sign of the Times, programme, Marc Weitzmann established a link between this debate, the question of uncertainty, nature and mankind, and the thoughts of French urbanist Paul Virilio (1932-2018). Scarred by the blitzkrieg and his lost childhood, and the idea that acceleration prevents anticipation and can lead to coincidence, Virilio, author of Speed and Politics (MIT Press, 2006), The Original Accidentl (Polity Press, 2007), and The Great Accelerator (Polity Press, 2012), emphasised that industrial and natural disasters progressed not only geometrically but also geographically, if not cosmically. In his view, this progress of contemporary coincidence requires a new intelligence in which the principle of responsibility permanently supplants the principle of technoscientific effectiveness, which is, considers Virilio, arrogant to the point of delusion [16].

Thus, as in Rousseau, our natural disasters seem increasingly inseparable from our anthropic disasters. All the more so since, as we now know, we have through our human and industrial actions altered the course of time in all its meanings: climate time, as well as speed time, or acceleration.

The fine metaphor used by futurists on the need to have good headlights at night – the faster we travel, the brighter they need to be – seems somewhat outdated. While, today, we are collectively wondering whether the road still exists, we can still enjoy inventing, plotting, and carving out a new path. For, in the words of Gaston Berger, the future is not only what may happen or what is most likely to happen, but is also, and increasingly so, what we want it to be. Predicting a disaster is conditional: it involves predicting what would happen if we did nothing to change the situation rather than what will happen in any event [17].

Risk management will remain a fundamental necessity on the path we choose. What is more, any initiative involves a degree of uncertainty which we can only ever partially reduce. This uncertainty will never absolve our individual and collective responsibilities as elected representatives or citizens. This uncertainty, in turn, creates a duty of anticipation [18].

Anticipation culture must feature at the heart of our public and collective policies. To that end, we must employ foresight methods that are genuinely robust and operational, along with impact prior analyses for the actions to be taken. That is the only way to tackle a new future without false impressions.

In his conclusions of The Imperative of Responsability, Hans Jonas decreed that, facing the threat of nuclear war, ecological ravage, genetic engineering, and the like, fear was a requirement for tackling the future [19]. We must treat anticipation in the same way. Thus anticipation meets hope, each being a consequence of the other.

 

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

Related paper: Increasing rationality in decision-making through policy impact prior analysis (July 12, 2021)

 

Direct access to PhD2050’s English papers

 

[1] Free translation from: Antony BEEVOR, Stalingrad, p. 231-232 et 252 , Paris, de Fallois, 1999.

[2] Riel MILLER, Futures Literacy: transforming the future, in R. MILLER ed., Transforming the Future, Anticipation in the 21st Century, p. 2, Paris, UNESCO – Abingdon, Routledge, 2018.

[3] Gaston BERGER, L’attitude prospective, dans Phénoménologie et prospective, p. 270sv, Paris, PUF, 1964.

[4] According to the systemist Edgar Morin, emergence is an organizational product which, although inseparable from the system as a whole, appears not only at the global level, but possibly at the level of the components. Emergence is a new quality in relation to the constituents of the system. It therefore has the virtue of an event, since it arises in a discontinuous manner once the system has been constituted; it has of course the character of irreducibility; it is a quality which cannot be broken down, and which cannot be deduced from previous elements. E. MORIN, La méthode, t.1, p. 108, Paris, Seuil, 1977. – The concept of emergence finds its origin in George Henry Lewes. To urge that we do not know how theses manifold conditions emerge in the phenomenon Feeling, it is to say that the synthetic fact has not been analytically resolved into all its factor. It is equally true that we do not know how Water emerges from Oxygen and Hydrogen. The fact of an emergence we know; and we may be certain that what emerges is the expression of its conditions, – every effect being the procession of its cause. George Henry LEWES, Problems of Life and Mind, t. 2, p. 412, London, Trübner & Co, 1874. – André LALANDE, Vocabulaire technique et critique de la philosophie, p. 276-277, Paris, PUF, 1976.

[5] See: Transdisciplinarité in Ph. DESTATTE & Philippe DURANCE dir., Les mots-clés de la prospective territoriale, p. 51, Paris, La Documentation française, 2009. http://www.institut-destree.eu/wa_files/philippe-destatte_philippe-durance_mots-cles_prospective_documentation-francaise_2008.pdf

[6] Nassim Nicholas TALEB, The Black Swan, The Impact of the Highly Improbable, New York, Random House, 2007.

[7] Daniel KAHNEMAN & Amos TVERSKY, Prospect theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk, in Econometrica, Journal of the econometric society, 1979, vol. 47, nr 2, p. 263-291. https://www.jstor.org/stable/1914185?seq=1

[8] Pierre ROSANVALLON, Counter-Democracy, Politics in an Age of Distrust, Cambridge University Press,  2008.

[9] Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lettre à Monsieur de Voltaire sur ses deux poèmes sur « la Loi naturelle » et sur « le Désastre de Lisbonne », présentée par Jean-Paul DELEAGE, dans Écologie & politique, 2005, 30, p. 141-154.

https://www.cairn.info/revue-ecologie-et-politique1-2005-1-page-141.htm

[10] Cfr Marc Weitzmann, Le Cygne noir, une énigme de notre temps, ou la prévision prise en défaut, avec Cynthia Fleury, Bruno Tertrais et Erwan Queinnec, Signes des Temps, France Culture, https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/signes-des-temps/le-cygne-noir-une-enigme-de-notre-temps-ou-la-prevision-prise-en-defaut

[11] Sofiane BOUHDIBA, Lisbonne, le 1er novembre 1755 : un hasard ? Au cœur de la polémique entre Voltaire et Rousseau, A travers champs, 19 octobre 2014. S. Bouhdiba est démographe à l’Université de Tunis. https://presquepartout.hypotheses.org/1023 – Jean-Paul POIRIER, Le tremblement de terre de Lisbonne, Paris, Odile Jacob, 2005.

[12] Translation taken from the Online Library of Liberty, https://oll.libertyfund.org/quote/voltaire-laments-the-destruction-of-lisbon-in-an-earthquake-and-criticises-the-philosophers-who-thought-that-all-s-well-with-the-world-and-the-religious-who-thought-it-was-god-s-will-1755.

VOLTAIRE, Poème sur le désastre de Lisbonne (1756), Œuvres complètes, Paris, Garnier, t. 9, p. 475. Wikisources : https://fr.wikisource.org/wiki/Page:Voltaire_-_%C5%92uvres_compl%C3%A8tes_Garnier_tome9.djvu/485

[13] We are talking about theodicy here. This consists in the justification of the goodness of God by the refutation of the arguments drawn from the existence. This concept was introduced by the German philosopher and mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz (1646-1716) in an attempt to reconcile the apparent contradiction between, on the one hand, the misfortunes that prevail on earth and, on the other hand, the power and the goodness of God. LEIBNITZ, Essais de théodicée sur la bonté de Dieu, la liberté de l’Homme et l’origine du mal, Amsterdam, F. Changuion, 1710. – See Patrick SHERRY, Theodicy in Encyclopedia Britannica, https://www.britannica.com/topic/theodicy-theology. Accessed 28 August 2021.

We know that in his tale Candide, or Optimism, published in 1759, Voltaire will deform and mock Leibnitzian thought through the caricatural character of Pangloss and the formula everything is at best in the best of all possible worlds … VOLTAIRE, Candide ou l’Optimisme, in VOLTAIRE, Romans et contes, Edition établie par Frédéric Deloffre et Jacques Van den Heuvel, p. 145-233, Paris, Gallimard, 1979.

[14] Translation from Internet Archive, Letter to Voltaire, Pl, IV, 1060-1062, p. 51.

 https://archive.org/details/RousseauToVoltairet.marshall/page/n1/mode/2up?q=lisbon,

Lettre à Monsieur de Voltaire sur ses deux poèmes sur la « Loi naturelle » et sur « Le Désastre de Lisbonne », 18 août 1756. in Jean-Paul DELEAGE, op. cit.

[15] J.-J. ROUSSEAU, Confessions, IX, Paris, 1767, cité par Sofiane BOUHDIBA, op. cit.

[16] Paul VIRILIO, L’accident originel, p. 3, Paris, Galilée, 2005.

[17] G. BERGER, Phénoménologie et prospective…, p. 275. (Free translation).

[18] Voir à ce sujet Pierre LASCOUMES, La précaution comme anticipation des risques résiduels et hybridation de la responsabilité, dans L’année sociologique, Paris, PUF, 1996, 46, n°2, p. 359-382.

[19] Hans JONAS, The Imperative of Responsability, In Search of an Ethics for the Technological Age, The University of Chicago Press, 1984.

Hour-en-Famenne, 20 août 2021

Anticiper signifie imaginer puis agir avant que les événements ou les actions ne surviennent, c’est donc passer à l’acte en fonction de ce qui est imaginé. C’est dire l’extrême complexité du processus et si notre rapport à l’avenir est difficile. La maxime « Gouverner, c’est prévoir » s’accommode mal de cette logique de complexité. Elle renvoie aussi à la responsabilité individuelle. Jeter la pierre au politique, c’est un peu facile et abusif. Il appartient à chacun de se gouverner et donc de « prévoir ». Or, nous sommes constamment pris en défaut d’anticipation dans notre vie au quotidien [1].

 

 1. Notre rapport à l’avenir

Notre rapport à l’avenir est difficile. On peut distinguer cinq attitudes dans lesquelles l’anticipation ne sera que la cinquième. La première est fréquente : on laisse venir, c’est-à-dire qu’on attend que les choses adviennent. On espère que tout ira bien. C’est le business as usual, on z’a toudi bin fé comme çoula, comme on dit en wallon. On peut aussi mobiliser l’expression des mineurs, quand on boisait encore les galeries des charbonnages : çà n’pou mau… cela ne peut mal, il n’y a pas de risque, c’est solide, on peut avoir confiance… Mon père m’a appris à me moquer de cette attitude désinvolte. Et surtout à m’en défier.

La deuxième attitude se veut plus active : elle consiste à se mouvoir en suivant les règles du jeu, les normes. Les élus y sont très attentifs, mais aussi chacun d’entre nous. Nous devons avoir un extincteur dans notre véhicule en cas d’incendie, mais surtout pour répondre aux obligations de la loi, à la réglementation, au contrôle technique… Remarquez que les bâtiments publics, les entreprises doivent également en disposer et les faire contrôler régulièrement. Rares sont les personnes qui ont un ou plusieurs extincteurs dans leur maison ou appartement, et s’ils en sont équipés, ceux-ci sont-ils en ordre de fonctionnement et adaptés aux différents types de feu qui peuvent survenir ? Nous savons que ce n’est pas légalement obligatoire et la plupart y renoncent.

La troisième attitude face à l’avenir est la réactivité : nous répondons à des stimuli extérieurs et nous nous adaptons rapidement aux situations qui se présentent. C’est évidemment l’image du pompier, de l’urgentiste, mais aussi de l’entrepreneur qui vient à l’esprit. Même si c’est une vertu, nous savons que parfois la réactivité ne peut plus grand-chose face au cours rapide des événements. Pour plaider pour leur discipline, les prospectivistes répètent souvent une formule qu’ils attribuent à l’homme d’État Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord (1754-1838) : quand c’est urgent, c’est déjà trop tard.

La quatrième attitude face à l’avenir est celle de la préactivité : la capacité que nous avons – ou pas – de nous préparer aux changements, dès lors qu’ils sont prévisibles. Le mot prévisible renvoie bien évidemment à la prévision, c’est-à-dire qu’on émet une hypothèse sur le futur, généralement quantifiée et assortie d’un indice de confiance, en fonction d’une attente. Cela implique la prise en compte d’un certain nombre de variables, d’éléments du système, dans un contexte de stabilité structurelle préalable, leur analyse et celle de leurs évolutions possibles. Ces dernières font l’objet d’un calcul de leur degré de probabilité. La vérification est toujours incertaine à cause de la complexité des systèmes que constituent les variables dans la réalité. L’exemple courant est la météo : elle m’annonce une probabilité de pluviosité à telle heure : en étant préactif, je me munis de mon parapluie, ou j’accumule des sacs de sable devant mes portes…

La cinquième attitude face à l’avenir est la proactivité. Dans son ouvrage consacré à la bataille de Stalingrad – 55 ans après les faits – l’historien et ancien officier britannique Antony Beevor reproche au général allemand Friedrich Paulus (1890-1957) de ne pas, en tant que responsable militaire, s’être préparé à affronter la menace d’encerclement qui se présentait à lui depuis des semaines, notamment en ne conservant pas une capacité blindée robuste et mobile. Celle-ci aurait permis à la Sixième Armée de la Wehrmacht de se défendre efficacement au moment crucial. Mais, ajoute Beevor, cela supposait une claire appréciation du danger véritable [2]. Cela signifie que, face à des changements attendus et identifiés (je parlerais de prospective exploratoire), voire de changements voulus, que je vais provoquer, construire (je parlerais alors de prospective normative), je vais agir. Anticiper signifie à la fois imaginer puis agir par avance, c’est-à-dire agir avant que les événements, les actions ne surviennent.

 

2. Une triple difficulté pour appréhender le futur

La difficulté dans laquelle nous nous trouvons, chacun d’entre nous, face au futur est triple. La première c’est que, dans la tradition de Gaston Berger (1896-1960) [3], on nous demande de voir loin, mais qu’en réalité le futur n’existe pas en tant qu’objet de connaissance. Il n’existe pas bien sûr parce qu’il n’est pas écrit, qu’il n’est pas déterminé – comme le pensait Marx ou le pensent aujourd’hui certains tenants de la théorie de l’effondrement.

On nous demande aussi de voir large, de réfléchir de manière systémique. Mais les prévisions ne portent jamais que sur un nombre limité de variables, même à l’heure du Big Data. Or, nous nous trouvons face à des systèmes qui sont tous complexes, qui sont au cœur d’un enchevêtrement d’événements improbables. Tous connaissent des émergences, des apparitions soudaines, liées aux relations entre acteurs et facteurs au sein du système. Je peux, en conduisant ma voiture, anticiper une flaque d’eau pour éviter l’aquaplanage ou une plaque de verglas, en me disant que je ne peux pas freiner. Mais en fait, je ne sais jamais quelle sera ma réaction en sentant mes roues trembler, celle de ma voiture, de mes pneus, du revêtement, ou celle des conducteurs qui sont devant ou derrière moi, ou sur les autres bandes, voire de l’oiseau qui viendra à ce moment percuter mon pare-brise. Donc, je dois m’accommoder de la complexité, mais je ne peux jamais la réduire.

La troisième difficulté, c’est que face à des systèmes aussi complexes que le monde, mes propres outils de connaissance sont limités. Nous sommes formés à des disciplines, à des épistémologies, des modes de connaissances, des vocabulaires, des jargons scientifiques qui ne favorisent pas la pluridisciplinarité (étude d’une discipline par plusieurs disciplines), l’interdisciplinarité (le transfert des méthodes d’une discipline à l’autre), la transdisciplinarité (une approche exigeante qui va entre, à travers et au-delà des disciplines), pour reprendre les distinctions du physicien franco-roumain Basarab Nicolescu, à la suite des travaux de Jean Piaget (1896-1980) [4]. Ces étroitesses d’esprit et réticences à nous ouvrir affectent notre modestie, favorisent les idées reçues, créent de l’ambiguïté (les mots n’ont pas le même sens), empêchent le dialogue constructif nécessaire, nuisent à l’intelligence collective.

C’est le grand mérite des économistes et prospectivistes français Jacques Lesourne (1928-2020) et Michel Godet d’avoir montré les limites de la prévision qui recherche dans le passé des invariants ou des modèles de relations pour postuler sa permanence ou son évolution plus ou moins constante dans l’avenir, amenant à des prévisions conditionnelles : ceteris paribus, all things being equals, « toutes choses étant égales par ailleurs ». Le travail majeur de Michel Godet s’est intitulé Crise de la prévision, essor de la prospective (PUF, 1977). Ainsi, à la suite du philosophe Gaston Berger, lui-même nourri par les pensées de Teilhard de Chardin (1881-1955) et de Maurice Blondel (1861-1949), et de nombreuses sources d’inspirations anglo-saxonnes, s’est développée l’attitude prospective. Il s’agit d’une posture intellectuelle qui consiste à prendre en considération le long terme passé et futur, à appréhender de manière décloisonnée l’ensemble du système ainsi qu’à envisager de manière collective des capacités et des moyens d’action.

On comprend que dans notre cadre culturel, mental, intellectuel, scientifique, social et politique, cette approche n’est pas favorisée. Elle nous fait pourtant passer de la question « que va-t-il advenir » à la question « que peut-il advenir » et donc au what if ? Que se passe-t-il si ? Elle se lie aussi à une de nos préoccupations brûlantes : l’analyse préalable d’impact à court, moyen et long terme des décisions que nous prenons.

La prospective a développé des méthodes fondées justement sur la question de ces émergences. À côté des analyses de tendances et des trajectoires – qui peuvent appréhender des crises comme celle du chaudron de la finance mondiale, en 2008 – , elle travaille aussi sur les wildcards : des surprises majeures, des événements inattendus, surprenants, peu probables, qui peuvent avoir des effets considérables s’ils surviennent : le 11 septembre 2001, le volcan islandais en avril 2010, la crise du Covid en 2019, les inondations de juillet 2021, etc.

On parle aussi beaucoup aujourd’hui de cygne noir à la suite des travaux de l’ancien trader Nassim Nicholas Taleb, professeur d’ingénierie du risque à I’Université de New York. Il s’agit d’identifier des événements statistiquement presque impossibles – on parle de dissonance statistique -, mais qui se produisent tout de même [5].

 

3. Construire un agenda politique sur la complexité

Il faut d’abord se méfier des biais rétrospectifs, mis en évidence par l’économiste, psychologue et futur Prix Nobel Daniel Kahneman ainsi que son collègue Amos Tversky qui consistent à surestimer a posteriori le fait que les événements auraient pu être anticipés. Ces biais sont liés au besoin que nous avons tous de donner du sens, y compris aux événements les plus aléatoires [6]. Lorsque l’imprévisible arrive, il nous est intellectuellement assez facile de le trouver prévisible.

Ensuite, il faut observer que le dirigeant politique est confronté aux questions centrales de l’appropriation, de la légitimité et de l’acceptabilité – notamment budgétaire – d’une décision qui se prend au bout d’un processus de dialogue et de négociation avec de multiples interlocuteurs. Le citoyen n’est pas nécessairement prêt à accepter de lourdes dépenses de l’État pour appréhender des problèmes qu’il ne visualise pas encore. Comme Saint Thomas, tant qu’on ne touche pas, on n’y croit pas. S’agit-il d’un « Stop béton » ou d’un stock périssable de masques ? La population n’est pas d’emblée prête à entendre ce que les politiques ont à lui dire à ce sujet. Pour l’expert comme pour l’élu, il ne suffit donc plus d’affirmer, il faut aujourd’hui prouver scientifiquement. Et surtout éviter le déni, car le lien à l’émotionnel peut être grand. Il ne faut pas non plus négliger le rôle considérable joué par le facteur médiatique. On a longtemps cru qu’une pandémie était un risque acceptable comme dans les années 1960 avec la grippe de Hong Kong qui fit au moins un million de morts dans le monde de 1968 à 1970, alors que la vision des victimes de la Covid-19 aux soins intensifs est insoutenable et accroît notre refus du nombre de morts. Rappelons-nous combien, en France, la ministre de la Santé Roselyne Bachelot fut critiquée et accusée de dilapider les deniers publics lorsqu’elle avait acheté des masques sanitaires et des vaccins contre la grippe liée au virus (H1N1) en 2009-2010. Dans le même temps, l’être humain a une grande capacité à s’habituer au risque. Pensons à l’épée de Damoclès nucléaire de la Guerre froide, présente jusqu’au début des années 1990. Interrogeons-nous aussi pour savoir si ce risque nucléaire militaire – l’apocalypse anthropique – a disparu.

On se retrouve donc constamment dans la nécessité de s’accorder sur la priorité des enjeux. Construire un agenda politique sur une telle complexité n’est pas du tout évident et le dirigeant politique se dit : ne va-t-on pas me reprocher d’ouvrir des chantiers qui peuvent ne pas paraître urgents ou à ce point importants qu’ils méritent attention soutenue, mobilisation des acteurs et budgets conséquents ?

Enfin, gouverner, ce n’est pas seulement résoudre des problèmes d’organisation, allouer des ressources, et planifier les actions dans le temps. Gouverner, c’est aussi rendre les choses intelligibles, comme le rappelle Pierre Rosanvallon [7]. Le monde politique ne prend pas assez la mesure de l’importance du facteur pédagogique. En Belgique, il ne vient plus à la télévision s’adresser aux gens, droit dans les yeux, pour expliquer un enjeu qu’il est impératif de relever. Les communications gouvernementales ont disparu, ne subsistent plus que les allocutions télévisées du chef de l’État qui en vient ainsi à être le dernier acteur à communiquer encore par ce biais des valeurs aux citoyens.

 

Conclusion : incertitude, responsabilité et anticipation

En mai 2020, en période de confinement lié au Covid19, l’animateur de Signes des Temps sur France-Culture, Marc Weitzmann, eut la bonne idée de rappeler le premier grand débat du siècle des Lumières sur les catastrophes naturelles et leurs conséquences sur les populations humaines [8], débat tenu entre Voltaire (1694-1778) et Rousseau (1712-1778) au sujet de la catastrophe de Lisbonne de 1755 [9].

Le Tsunami de Lisbonne – Gravure sur bois – The Granger Collection NYC (HRP5XD)

Ainsi, lorsque le 1er novembre 1755 – jour de la Toussaint -, un séisme brutal frappe Lisbonne, trois vagues successives de 5 à 15 mètres de haut ravagent le port et le centre-ville[10], plusieurs dizaines de milliers d’habitants perdent la vie dans le tremblement de terre, le tsunami et le gigantesque incendie qui se suivent. Lorsqu’il l’apprend, Voltaire en est très affecté et, compte tenu de la gravité de l’événement, écrit, quelques semaines plus tard, un poème fameux dont l’intention dépasse la simple évocation de la catastrophe ou la compassion envers les victimes.

Philosophes trompés qui criez tout est bon,

Accourez, contemplez ces ruines affreuses,

Ces débris, ces lambeaux, ces cendres malheureuses,

Ces femmes, ces enfants l’un sur l’autre entassés,

Sous ces marbres rompus ces membres dispersés ;

Cent mille infortunés que la terre dévore,

Qui, sanglants, déchirés, et palpitants encore,

Enterrés sous leurs toits, terminent sans secours

Dans l’horreur des tourments leurs lamentables jours !

Aux cris demi-formés de leurs voix expirantes,

Au spectacle effrayant de leurs cendres fumantes,

Direz-vous : « C’est l’effet des éternelles lois

Qui d’un Dieu libre et bon nécessitent le choix » ? [11]

 Dans ce Poème sur le désastre de Lisbonne, dont ces quelques lignes ne sont qu’un extrait, Voltaire s’interroge sur la pertinence de mettre l’évènement sur le compte de la justice divine alors que, comme le disent alors certains philosophes qualifiés d’optimistes, tout ce qui est naturel serait don de Dieu, donc, finalement, bon et juste[12]. Sans remettre en cause la puissance divine, l’encyclopédiste combat cette conception, rejette l’idée d’une punition céleste spécifique qui voudrait faire payer quelque vices à la capitale portugaise et désigne plutôt la fatalité comme responsable de la catastrophe.

Comme l’indique Jean-Paul Deléage, qui a publié en 2005 dans la revue Écologie et Politique la lettre que Rousseau adresse à Voltaire le 18 août 1756, le philosophe genevois va proposer une conception nouvelle de la responsabilité humaine. Cette conception sera davantage sociale et politique que métaphysique et religieuse. Ainsi, dans sa réponse à Voltaire, Rousseau affirme ce qui suit :

 (…) , je crois avoir montré qu’excepté la mort, qui n’est presque un mal que par les préparatifs dont on la fait précéder, la plupart de nos maux physiques sont encore notre ouvrage. Sans quitter votre sujet de Lisbonne, convenez, par exemple, que la nature n’avoit point rassemblé là vingt mille maisons de six à sept étages, et que, si les habitants de cette grande ville eussent été dispersés plus également et plus légèrement logés, le dégât eût été beaucoup moindre et peut-être nul. Tout eût fui au premier ébranlement, et on les eût vus le lendemain à vingt lieues de là, tout aussi gais que s’il n’étoit rien arrivé. Mais il faut rester, s’opiniâtrer autour des masures, s’exposer à de nouvelles secousses, parce que ce qu’on laisse vaut mieux que ce qu’on peut emporter. Combien de malheureux ont péri dans ce désastre pour vouloir prendre, l’un ses habits, l’autre ses papiers, l’autre son argent ! Ne sait-on pas que la personne de chaque homme est devenue la moindre partie de lui-même, et que ce n’est presque pas la peine de la sauver quand on a perdu tout le reste ? [13]

Si, pour Voltaire, le désastre de Lisbonne est un hasard et un malheureux concours de circonstances, Rousseau voit dans l’action des hommes, dans leurs choix urbanistiques ainsi que dans leur attitude lors du cataclysme, l’aggravation des effets sismiques naturels. En fait, c’est la responsabilité des comportements humains que Rousseau met en avant, considérant d’ailleurs que, au fond, si Lisbonne a été détruite, cela relève de la décision des hommes d’avoir construit une ville à la fois sur les bords de l’océan et près d’une faille sismique… Donc, oserions-nous écrire, un défaut d’anticipation [14].

Rousseau reviendra sur ces questions notamment dans ses Confessions, disculpant à nouveau la Providence et affirmant que tous les maux de la vie humaine trouvent finalement leur origine dans l’abus que l’homme a fait de ses facultés plus que dans la nature elle-même [15].

Dans l’émission Signes des Temps, si bien nommée, Marc Weitzmann établit une relation entre ce débat, la question de l’incertitude, de la nature et de l’être humain, avec la pensée de l’urbaniste français Paul Virilio (1932-2018). Marqué par la Blitzkrieg et l’exode de son enfance, l’idée que l’accélération empêche l’anticipation et peut mener à l’accident, l’auteur notamment de Vitesse et Politique (1977), L’accident originel (2005), Le Grand accélérateur (2010), soulignait que les catastrophes industrielles ou naturelles progressaient de manière non seulement géométrique, mais géographique, si ce n’est cosmique. Selon Virilio, ce progrès de l’accident contemporain exige une intelligence nouvelle où le principe de responsabilité supplanterait définitivement celui de l’efficacité des technosciences arrogantes jusqu’au délire [16].

Ainsi, comme chez Rousseau, nos catastrophes naturelles apparaissent de plus en plus inséparables de nos catastrophes anthropiques. D’autant que, nous le savons désormais, nous avons, par nos actions humaines et industrielles, modifié le cours du temps dans toutes ses acceptions : temps climat, mais aussi temps vitesse, accélération.

La belle métaphore des prévisionnistes et prospectivistes sur la nécessité de disposer de bons phares dans la nuit, d’autant meilleurs que nous roulons plus vite, semble parfois dépassée. En fait, alors que nous nous demandons aujourd’hui collectivement si la route existe encore, nous pouvons nous réjouir de pouvoir inventer, tracer, creuser un nouveau chemin. Car, en effet, l’avenir n’est pas seulement ce qui peut arriver ou ce qui a le plus de chance de se produire, disait Gaston Berger, il est aussi, dans une proportion qui ne cesse de croître, ce que nous voulons qu’il fût. Prévoir une catastrophe est conditionnel : c’est prévoir ce qui arriverait si nous ne faisions rien pour changer le cours des choses, et non point ce qui arrivera de toute manière [17].

Sur la trajectoire que nous choisirons la gestion des risques restera fondamentalement nécessaire. Toute initiative implique d’ailleurs une marge d’incertitude que nous ne pourrons jamais que partiellement réduire. Cette incertitude n’exonèrera jamais nos responsabilités, individuelles et collectives, celles des élus comme celles des citoyens. Cette incertitude crée à son tour un devoir d’anticipation [18].

La culture de l’anticipation doit figurer au cœur de nos politiques publiques et collectives. Nous devons mobiliser à cet effet des méthodes de prospective véritablement robustes et opérationnelles ainsi que des analyses préalables d’impacts des actions à mener. C’est la voie indispensable pour aborder un nouvel avenir sans fausse illusion.

Ainsi, tout comme dans Le Principe responsabilité Hans Jonas décrétait la crainte comme une obligation pour aborder l’avenir [19], nous faisons de même avec l’anticipation. Celle-ci rejoint donc l’espérance, corollaire de l’une et de l’autre.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

 

[1] Ce texte constitue la mise au net de quelques notes prises dans le cadre de l’interview de Pierre HAVAUX, Gouverner, c’est prévoir…, parue dans Le Vif du 5 août 2021, p. 74-75.

[2] Antony BEEVOR, Stalingrad, p. 231-232 et 252 , Paris, de Fallois, 1999.

[3] Gaston BERGER, L’attitude prospective, dans Phénoménologie et prospective, p. 270sv, Paris, PUF, 1964.

[4] Voir l’article Transdisciplinarité dans Ph. DESTATTE et Philippe DURANCE dir., Les mots-clés de la prospective territoriale, p. 51, Paris, La Documentation française, 2009.

http://www.institut-destree.eu/wa_files/philippe-destatte_philippe-durance_mots-cles_prospective_documentation-francaise_2008.pdf

[5] Nicholas TALEB, Cygne noir, La puissance de l’imprévisible, (The Black Swan), Random House, 2007.

[6] Daniel KAHNEMAN & Amos TVERSKY, Prospect theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk, in Econometrica, Journal of the econometric society, 1979, vol. 47, nr 2, p. 263-291.

https://www.jstor.org/stable/1914185?seq=1

[7] ROSANVALLON Pierre, La contre-démocratie, La politique à l’âge de la défiance, p. 313, Paris, Seuil, 2006

[8] La formule est de Jean-Paul Deléage. Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lettre à Monsieur de Voltaire sur ses deux poèmes sur « la Loi naturelle » et sur « le Désastre de Lisbonne », présentée par Jean-Paul DELEAGE, dans Écologie & politique, 2005, 30, p. 141-154. https://www.cairn.info/revue-ecologie-et-politique1-2005-1-page-141.htm

[9] Cfr Marc Weitzmann, Le Cygne noir, une énigme de notre temps, ou la prévision prise en défaut, avec Cynthia Fleury, Bruno Tertrais et Erwan Queinnec, Signes des Temps, France Culture,

https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/signes-des-temps/le-cygne-noir-une-enigme-de-notre-temps-ou-la-prevision-prise-en-defaut

[10] Sofiane BOUHDIBA, Lisbonne, le 1er novembre 1755 : un hasard ? Au cœur de la polémique entre Voltaire et Rousseau, A travers champs, 19 octobre 2014. S. Bouhdiba est démographe à l’Université de Tunis. https://presquepartout.hypotheses.org/1023 – Jean-Paul POIRIER, Le tremblement de terre de Lisbonne, 1755, Paris, Odile Jacob, 2005.

[11] VOLTAIRE, Poème sur le désastre de Lisbonne (1756), Œuvres complètes, Paris, Garnier, t. 9, p. 475.

Wikisources : https://fr.wikisource.org/wiki/Page:Voltaire_-_%C5%92uvres_compl%C3%A8tes_Garnier_tome9.djvu/485

[12] On parle ici de la théodicée. Celle-ci consiste en la justification de la bonté de Dieu par la réfutation des arguments tirés de l’existence. Ce concept avait été introduit par le philosophe et mathématicien allemand Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz (1646-1716) pour tenter de concilier l’apparente contradiction entre, d’une part, les malheurs qui sévissent sur terre et, d’autre part, la puissance et la bonté de Dieu. LEIBNITZ, Essais de théodicée sur la bonté de Dieu, la liberté de l’Homme et l’origine du mal, Amsterdam, F. Changuion, 1710. – On sait que dans son conte Candide, ou l’Optimisme, publié en 1759, et qui est en quelque sorte la réponse à la lettre de Rousseau, Voltaire déformera et tournera en dérision la pensée leibnitzienne au travers du personnage caricatural de Pangloss et de la formule tout est au mieux dans le meilleur des mondes possibles… Voir aussi Henry DUMERY, Théodicée, dans Encyclopædia Universalis en ligne, consulté le 18 août 2021. https://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/theodicee/  

Dès le 24 novembre 1755, première référence de Voltaire à la catastrophe de Lisbonne dans sa correspondance selon Théodore Besterman, le philosophe écrit à Jean-Robert Tronchin : Voilà Monsieur une physique bien cruelle. On sera bien embarrassé à deviner comment les lois du mouvement opèrent des désastres si effroyables dans le meilleur des mondes possibles. Cent mille fourmis, notre prochain, écrasées tout d’un coup dans notre fourmilière, et la moitié périssant sans doute dans des angoisses inexprimables au milieu des débris dont on ne peut les tirer : des familles ruinées au bout de l’Europe, la fortune de cent commerçants de votre patrie abîmée dans les rues de Lisbonne. Quel triste jeu de hasard que le jeu de la vie humaine ! Lettre à Jean-Robert Tronchin, dans VOLTAIRE, Correspondance, IV (Janvier 1754-décembre 1757), Edition Theodore Besterman, coll. La Pléiade, n° 4265, p. 619 et 1394, Paris, Gallimard, 1978. – Dans une autre lettre adressée à Elie Bernard le 26 novembre, Voltaire écrit : Voici la triste confirmation du désastre de Lisbonne et de vingt autres villes. C’est cela qui est sérieux. Si Pope avait été à Lisbonne aurait-il osé dire, tout est bien ? Op. cit., p. 620. Voir aussi p. 622-623, 627, 629, 637, 643 du 19 décembre 1755 où il semble adresse les vers au Comte d’Argental, 644, 695, 697-699 avec une référence à Leibnitz, 711, 717, 719-721, 724, 727-729, 735, 751, 757, 778, 851-852. La lettre 4559 du 12 septembre 1756, p. 846, est l’accusé de réception de Voltaire à Rousseau de sa critique du Désastre de Lisbonne. Voir aussi l’intéressant commentaire p. 1470-1471.

[13] Lettre à Monsieur de Voltaire sur ses deux poèmes sur la « Loi naturelle » et sur « Le Désastre de Lisbonne », 18 août 1756. dans Jean-Paul DELEAGE, op. cit.

[14] Rousseau poursuit d’ailleurs : Je ne vois pas qu’on puisse chercher la source du mal moral ailleurs que dans l’homme libre, perfectionné, partant corrompu ; et quant aux maux physiques, si la matière sensible et impassible est une contradiction, comme il me le semble, ils sont inévitables dans tout système dont l’homme fait partie ; et alors la question n’est point pourquoi l’homme n’est pas parfaitement heureux, mais pourquoi il existe. De plus, je crois avoir montré qu’excepté la mort, qui n’est presque un mal que par les préparatifs dont on la fait précéder, la plupart de nos maux physiques sont encore notre ouvrage. Ibidem, n°8.

[15] J.-J. ROUSSEAU, Confessions, IX, Paris, 1767, cité par Sofiane BOUHDIBA, op. cit. – J-P. POIRIER, Le tremblement de terre, p. 219 sv.

[16] Paul VIRILIO, L’accident originel, p. 3, Paris, Galilée, 2005. – Paul VIRILIO, Le krach actuel représente l’accident intégral par excellence, dans Le Monde, 18 octobre 2008, Cela fait trente ans que l’on fait l’impasse sur le phénomène d’accélération de l’Histoire, et que cette accélération est la source de la multiplication d’accidents majeurs. « L’accumulation met fin à l’impression de hasard », disait Freud à propos de la mort. Son mot-clé, ici, c’est hasard. Ces accidents ne sont pas des hasards. On se contente pour l’instant d’étudier le krach boursier sous l’angle économique ou politique, avec ses conséquences sociales. Mais on ne peut comprendre ce qui se passe si on ne met pas en place une économie politique de la vitesse, générée par le progrès des techniques, et si on ne la lie pas au caractère accidentel de l’Histoire.

https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2008/10/18/le-krach-actuel-represente-l-accident-integral-par-excellence_1108473_3232.html

[17] G. BERGER, Phénoménologie et prospective…, p. 275.

[18] Voir à ce sujet Pierre LASCOUMES, La précaution comme anticipation des risques résiduels et hybridation de la responsabilité, dans L’année sociologique, Paris, PUF, 1996, 46, n°2, p. 359-382.

[19] Hans JONAS, Le principe responsabilité, Une éthique pour la civilisation technologique, p. 301, Paris, Éditions du Cerf, 1990.

Boston, April 30, 2018

In order to conclude the symposium Grappling with the Futures, Insights from History, Philosophy, and Science, Technology and Society, hosted in Boston by Harvard University (Department of the History of Science) and Boston University (Department of Philosophy) on Sunday, April 29 and Monday, April 30, 2018, the organizers wanted to hear about related organizations or initiatives. They wanted to both learn more about them and figure out the potential added value of these possible new additions to the network, which should not duplicate existing ones and should foster mutually beneficial synergies. We therefore heard from Ted Gordon for the Millennium Project, Keri Facer for the Anticipation Conference, Cynthia Selin for the Arizona State University initiatives, Terry Collins for the Association of Professional Futurists, Philippe Durance for the CNAM, Jenny Andersson and Christina Garsten for the Global Foresight Project[1], and myself for The Destree Institute. This paper is a revised version of my short contribution given in this final panel.

 1. A Trajectory from Local to Global

Some groups mainly know The Destree Institute as a local NGO with quite a long history (it will be 80 years old in June 2018) of modest size (10 researchers), a foundation that operates as a ‘think and do tank’ and is close to the Parliament of Wallonia and government, a partner of the regional administration and very open to the world of entrepreneurship. It works at the crossroads between five or six universities in cross-border collaboration. Twenty years ago now, after 15 years of research in history and future studies, The Destree Institute created its Foresight Unit, supplementing this last year with a laboratory of collective, public and entrepreneurial policies for Wallonia in Europe: the Wallonia Policy Lab [2]. Its work in this area is intellectually supported by a Regional Foresight College consisting of 30 leaders from various spheres of society.

To others, The Destree Institute is first and foremost a European and global research Centre in the field of foresight, a worldwide NGO with a special consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) and an official partner of UNESCO (with consultative status) since 2012; a member of the Open Government Partnership Civil Society Community; a founder of the Brussels Area Node of the Millennium Project; a leading partner of many European initiatives; and the headquarters of the Millennia2025 Women and Innovation Foundation, a global foresight initiative for women’s empowerment and equality, involving more than 10,000 members, researchers and grassroots workers in five continents, whose international foresight research process was launched in 2008 with the support of the Millennium Project and the patronage of UNESCO’s Director-General.

Both views are correct. The Destree Institute’s development from a local history research Centre in Wallonia to a European and global foresight actor is easily traced; at the same time, it has succeeded in maintaining strong local roots.

One of the main ambitions and achievements of The Destree Institute lies in its ability to develop a strong operational conception of foresight. We use foresight not only to think about the future but to shift the system, to trigger transition and transformation. Far from just thinking that one could modify the future simply by looking at it, Gaston Berger – whose importance has been emphasized by the organizers of the symposium – saw change as a process that is hard to implement and difficult to conduct, as the American researchers in social psychology whose models inspired him had shown. Berger particularly referred to the theories of change and transformation processes described by Kurt Lewin, Ronald Lippitt, Jeanne Watson and Bruce Westley[3]. With this in mind, we developed in 2010 a tool named the Bifurcation Method (in the sense of ‘bifurcations’ used by Nobel Prize-Winner Ilya Prigogine) in order to identify the different moments when the system, or a part of it, or an actor, could take different directions or trajectories. We first apply this tool to the past in what we call the retroforesight phase, identifying trajectories that could have been taken at particular past moments and what developments would have ensued. We can then use the techniques of foresight to try to identify bifurcations and trajectories in the future, using institutional rendezvous, assumptions and wildcards, events of low probability but with high impacts which can open up the cone of the future and cause movement in the system.

In this way, we are able to structure concrete operational work drawing on the kind of expertise described during the symposium by historians, philosophers, STS experts and others.

2. History does not hold the keys to the future

From History to Foresight is also the title of a well-known book by Pierre Chaunu [4]. It was written by the great French historian and Sorbonne professor in 1975 for a collection named Liberty 2000.

Chaunu wrote that a good reading of the present, integrating the past, leads imperceptibly to the future. It is, by nature, foresight-oriented [5]. He added that this foresight is, of course, linked to the idea of mankind. It therefore involves the « unfolding » of history [6]. He also observed: History does not hold the keys to the future. It cannot map out the path, but a history that is made part of the human sciences can correct us; it can impose a check on infantile projections that are captive to the short term [7]. I think that the integration of future studies in the human sciences will always remain a real and difficult challenge.

Those who were able to attend the Harvard meeting certainly feel, as I do, that more than 40 years after Chaunu’s analysis, we are fully on track to achieve the aims that the main organizer Yashar Saghai (Johns Hopkins University) proposed at the opening of the symposium for the meeting and its follow-up: to end isolation within each discipline (history, philosophy, science, technology and society) and between countries, to learn from each other in depth beyond interdisciplinary conferences, to gain an up-to-date knowledge of current research, to deepen connections with future studies practitioners and theorists. Yashar also insisted on the importance of probing the needs for a permanent network or platform for our communities. The challenge is, as Riel Miller said in his keynote address but also in his new book[8], to reinforce our understandings, practices and capacities.

3. Main requirements for a permanent network or platform

With its partners, The Destree Institute has launched and/or managed many networks and platforms in the last twenty years: the Millennia2015 foresight process, the Millennia2025 Foundation, the Internet Society Wallonia Chapter, the European Regional Foresight College, the European Millennium Project Nodes Initiative (EuMPI), the Regional Foresight College of Wallonia, the Wallonia Territorial Intelligence Platform, etc.

In all cases, the main requirements were the same:

1. to define clear aims that make sense and generate a desire to involve all the actors. These goals should be understood by all the partners without ambiguity. Clarifying words and concepts is a key task for all scientific ambition, and as such is shared by the futurists;

2. to stay firmly connected to the ground and able to come back to the present: what we will do tomorrow needs to be thought about in the present. We need our heads in the stars but our feet in the clay…

3. to fight against certainty. We often talk in terms of trying to throw light on our uncertainties, but we should also fight our great certainties about our disciplines, our fields, our methods and our perceptions of the world;

4. good leadership with proper respect for the members. In March 2018, the Women’s Economic Forum awarded my colleague Marie-Anne Delahaut the Woman of the Decade in Community Leadership Prize for her work for Millennia2025 [9]. We all know how sensitive these tasks are;

5. professionalism in management, because we need to improve our work and gain precious time for our researchers instead of wasting it;

6. relevant communication materials (logos, websites, etc.), although I tend to say, as General de Gaulle might have done, that logistics should follow ideas rather than vice versa;

7. and finally, as Professor Michel Godet often repeats, loyalty, competence and pleasure.

Pleasure in thinking together, pleasure in working hard together, pleasure in meeting together.

I feel that we have assembled these ingredients during these two days shared at Harvard and Boston Universities. Thank you to the organizers for bringing us together.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

 

On the same subject: What is foresight?

Direct access to Philippe Destatte’s English papers

 

[1] Global Foresight Project :

https://www.socant.su.se/english/global-foresight/participating-researchers/christina-garsten

[2] Philippe DESTATTE, A Wallonia Policy Lab on the Foresight Trajectory, Blog PhD2050, Namur, April 11, 2018, https://phd2050.org/2018/04/11/wpl-en/

[3] Gaston BERGER, L’Encyclopédie française, vol. XX : Le Monde en devenir, 1959, p. 12-14, 20, 54, in Phénoménologie du temps et prospective, p. 271, Paris, PuF, 1964.

[4] Pierre CHAUNU, De l’histoire à la prospective, Paris, Robert Lafont, 1975.

[5] Une bonne lecture du présent intégrante du passé débouche, insensiblement, sur l’avenir, elle est, par nature, prospective. P. CHAUNU, op. cit. p., 283.

[6] Elle est, bien évidemment, liée à une idée de l’homme. Elle implique donc le « déroulé » de l’histoire. Ibidem, p. 285.

[7] L’Histoire n’a pas les clefs de l’avenir, elle ne peut pas tracer la voie, mais une histoire intégrée aux sciences de l’homme peut rectifier, elle peut réduire les projections enfantines, prisonnières du temps court. Ibidem.

[8] Riel MILLER, Transforming the future, Anticipation in the 21st Century, Paris-Abingdon, UNESCO-Routledge, 2018.

[9] http://www.millennia2015.org/Women_Economic_Forum_Award_2018_EN

Après avoir analysé les dérives sémantiques du concept de Révolution industrielle, rappelé comment l’idée de changement sociétal s’est construite au travers de la Révolution machiniste, et envisagé la Révolution cognitive du XXème siècle, notre réflexion porte sur la place du numérique dans ces mutations…

3. L’idée de Nouvelle Révolution industrielle au XXIème siècle

Au XXIème siècle, l’abus de l’utilisation du concept de révolution industrielle nous apparaît flagrant. Après la révolution numérique – qui suivant Jean Viard a même plus d’impact que le train [1] – puis la même mutation que l’on nomme digitale, celle des imprimantes 3D, celle du Big Data – qui sont sans nul doute fondamentalement liées -, il est même jusqu’à l’exploration de Mars qui aurait déjà provoqué une nouvelle révolution industrielle [2]. Nous avions d’ailleurs à peine tenté d’expliquer pourquoi la Troisième Révolution industrielle proclamée – et déjà revendue plusieurs fois – par Jeremy Rifkin [3] ne nous paraissait pas un modèle crédible, que nous étions confrontés à une nouvelle annonce. Comme aime à le rappeler Michel Godet, la mode a la mémoire courte…

3.1. Industrie 4.0.

Une quatrième révolution industrielle, avec le sigle moderniste d’Industrie 4.0, renvoyait à l’idée de l’usine numérisée et donc dite intelligente. La chronologie se fonde ici sur une trajectoire qui irait de la machine à vapeur (1784), de ce qui est nommé première révolution industrielle, mue par l’énergie hydraulique et fossile [4], au convoyeur (1870) d’une deuxième révolution industrielle portée par l’énergie électrique [5] et la production de masse, à l’automate programmable (1969) d’une troisième révolution industrielle fondée sur la logique programmable et les techniques de masse. Enfin, les logiciels de modélisation et l’internet industriel caractériseraient la quatrième révolution industrielle basée – depuis 2013 – sur la conception virtuelle et la modernisation [6]. Ce modèle trouverait son origine dans un des dix projets d’avenir de la stratégie high-tech lancée par le gouvernement fédéral allemand en 2006 [7]. Cette version initiale d’Industrie 4.0 se fonde sur une analyse prospective à l’horizon 2020 qui donne une grille de lecture inspirée par l’Institut Fraunhofer-IAO (Stuttgart) [8]. Quatre révolutions industrielles y sont recensées :

  1. Révolution industrielle par introduction de la production mécanique au moyen de l’eau et de la puissance de la vapeur (fin du XVIIIème s.) ;
  2. Révolution industrielle grâce à l’introduction du travail de masse par le biais de l’énergie électrique (début du XXème siècle) ;
  3. Révolution industrielle par l’utilisation de l’électronique et de l’informatique pour automatiser davantage la production (début des années ’70 du XXème siècle) ;
  4. Révolution industrielle basée sur la cyberphysique (aujourd’hui) [9].

En novembre 2014, le Comité économique et social européen (CESE) a organisé une conférence intitulée la Quatrième Révolution industrielle, une occasion pour l’Union européenne de prendre le leadership ? Le CESE y estime que, au-delà de la « servicisation » de l’industrie, un nouveau paradigme émerge, fondé sur l’internet des objets et des services. Dans ce modèle, le changement constituerait une nouvelle révolution industrielle qui ouvrirait une nouvelle ère succédant à l’automatisation : ce prodigieux bond en avant résulte d’une coopération verticale et horizontale entre la machine et l’internet, la machine et l’humain, la machine et la machine, tout au long de la chaîne de valeur et en temps réel. Des îlots d’automatisation seront interconnectés dans une multitude de réseaux et de variations. Les logiciels et les réseaux connecteront produits intelligents, services numériques et clients aux nouveaux « produits » innovants du futur [10]. Selon McKinsey, cette nouvelle révolution industrielle se fonderait sur l’idée que la moitié des douze technologies potentiellement de ruptures pour la prochaine décennie seraient numériques et auraient des vocations industrielles : l’internet mobile, l’automatisation de la recherche heuristique, l’internet des objets, la technologie du cloud, la robotique avancée, les véhicules intelligents, les imprimantes 3D [11]. Lorsqu’elle se pose, elle aussi, la question de savoir si Industrie 4.0 constitue un slogan marketing ou une vraie révolution industrielle ?, la Fabrique d’Industrie renvoie aux réseaux de production permettant l’interaction instantanée entre les outils industriels, la vitesse de conception des produits par intégration des cycles du design et des process de fabrication, ainsi qu’une plus grande flexibilité de la production grâce aux systèmes cyber-physiques (CPS), permettant une production de masse spécialisée, permettant la personnalisation des objets [12].

3.2. Distinguer changement dans le système et changement de système

La Fabrique d’Industrie aurait été plus précise ou davantage nuancée dans son titre en relisant l’article de François Bourdoncle dans le remarquable ouvrage intitulé L’industrie, notre avenir, que cette même Fabrique a publié en janvier 2015 sous la direction de Pierre Veltz et Thierry Weil. En effet, le président de FB&Cie et co-fondateur d’Exalead y avait décrit La révolution Big Data, en tant que troisième révolution numérique, c’est-à-dire troisième révolution dans l’histoire de l’informatique. Ce qui est assez différent d’une troisième ou quatrième révolution industrielle… Cette troisième période viendrait après une première transformation, de 1980 à 2000 qui est celle de l’avènement de l’informatique d’entreprises, avec ses formidables gains de productivité, et une deuxième, de 2000 à nos jours, qui serait celle des moteurs de recherche, des réseaux sociaux et de l’internet sur les téléphones mobiles, étendus du grand public aux entreprises. Nous avions identifié ce changement de paradigme lors des travaux La Wallonie au Futur [13], dès 1987, et décrit le lancement de cette phase d’économie numérique dans le travail de prospective de la Mission Prospective Wallonie 21 [14], dès 2000. Pour François Bourdoncle, la troisième révolution informatique vient de commencer, elle repose sur la capacité des entreprises à accumuler des quantités colossales de données, de les analyser et d’en tirer un profit commercial. Les exemples sont connus : Google, Facebook, Amazon, Apple-iTunes, Netflix, etc. Le président de FB&Cie voit quatre marqueurs de cette révolution Big Data : l’hybridation des métiers autour des usages, la convergence entre industrie et services, le déplacement de la valeur vers l’aval, au profit de la relation client et, enfin, l’accès massif au capital pour prendre le contrôle de l’ensemble de la chaîne de valeur [15].

L’intérêt de cette dernière approche, on l’aura compris, est qu’elle limite la révolution à la sphère numérique et ne fait pas d’un changement au sein d’un système technique, voire d’un sous-système, une mutation de l’ensemble du système, comme c’est le cas pour une révolution industrielle. Regarder l’évolution de cette manière ne sous-estime pas l’ampleur des changements actuels, inscrits dans la Révolution cognitive et marqués par les contraintes que nous nous imposons pour assurer la durabilité du système. Ce regard ne préjuge pas non plus l’ampleur des investissements humains et financiers nécessaires pour faire face à ces mutations. Ce que les Allemands appellent Industrie 4.0, et que, après les Français, nous essayons d’importer à notre tour, est une stratégie d’alliance lancée en 2011 entre l’Etat et les entreprises pour accélérer l’intégration entre le monde des TIC et celui de l’industrie. Là aussi, comme l’indiquent Dorothée Kohler et Jean-Daniel Weisz, une course contre la montre est engagée : celle de la redéfinition des modes d’apprentissage des savoirs. Comme l’écrit France Stratégie, qui a lancé fin 2015 un séminaire mensuel sur le sujet, le numérique ne nous attendra pas [16]. Ainsi, l’avenir du travail est-il devenu un enjeu de compétitivité au point que, à l’initiative du BMBF, le ministère de la Formation et de la Recherche, les Allemands ont lancé une réflexion réunissant tous les acteurs majeurs de cette problématique [17]. Cela nous rappelle que le changement technico-économique est souvent plus rapide que le changement social.

Conclusion : c’est l’être humain en société qui doit constituer la référence de tout horizon à construire

 D’abord, quatre idées peuvent résumer notre propos sur les révolutions industrielles.

  1. Les représentations du monde (macro-systèmes techniques, paradigmes, etc.) sont des concepts, modèles et systèmes. Ils sont donc construits par les êtres humains comme éléments intellectuels, pédagogiques, explicatifs. Ils n’existent pas en tant que réalités. Ils peuvent apparaître comme exploratoires ou stratégiques, et chaque fois pertinents ou fantaisistes. Il est assez vain de vouloir prouver qu’ils seraient – ou non – fondés sur le plan scientifique.
  1. La technique ne génère pas la société, elle en est une composante. Comme le rappelle François Caron, la formation d’un système technique peut-être analysée au travers de deux temps : d’abord, celui de l’émergence de technologies nouvelles, ensuite, celui de leur mise en cohérence au sein d’un système [18]. Cette observation peut expliquer certains décalages temporels. Les processus de transformations sont des processus dynamiques et complexes qui vivent des temporalités multiples.
  1. A chaque passage d’un type de société à un autre, quatre changements fondamentaux s’opèrent dans les pôles que constituent les matériaux, le temps, l’énergie et le vivant. (Gille, Portnoff, Gaudin). A chacun de ces pôles correspondent des innovations dans la troisième mutation : les polymères, l’intelligence artificielle, le nucléaire et le solaire, ainsi que la génétique. Il s’agit d’une grille de lecture particulièrement utile. Mais il en est d’autres, bien entendu.
  1. Si on les considère comme des mutations sociétales profondes et systémiques, des changements de civilisation, comme le fut la Révolution industrielle qui s’est effectuée dans nos pays, de 1700 à 1850 environ, ces transitions sont au nombre de trois : d’abord, la Révolution industrielle déjà mentionnée, ensuite, la Révolution cognitive que nous connaissons et, enfin, la transition vers le développement durable qui est une conséquence des limites et excès générés par l’industrialisation. Cette transition accompagne la dernière mutation. Je les vois comme les trois composantes du Nouveau Paradigme industriel [19] qui est à la fois notre héritage et le moment dans lequel nous vivons et pourrions vivre encore pendant un siècle ou davantage.

L’idée que ce n’est pas la technique qui fait le futur, mais que ce sont les femmes et les hommes qui le font, pourrait constituer notre conclusion. Elle est en filigrane de l’ouvrage que le physicien Chris Anderson, rédacteur en chef de Wired, a consacré à La Nouvelle Révolution industrielle : celle des Makers. Ainsi qu’il l’indique, l’ère de l’information, de l’informatique et de la communication, qui aurait commencé fin des années 1950, s’est poursuivie avec l’ordinateur personnel dans les années 1970 et 1980, puis avec internet dans les années 1990, n’aurait pas donné ses effets avant la démocratisation et l’amplification sur l’industrie manufacturière qu’elle produit seulement aujourd’hui. Dans cette révolution de fabricants, Anderson estime que ce sont les femmes et les hommes qui vont transformer la société, par leurs nouvelles pratiques permises par la technique numérique [20].

Les référents que nous avons cités ne disaient pas autre chose. Jacques Ellul estime dans Le système technicien que, aucune technique ne peut se développer hors d’un certain contexte économique, politique, intellectuel, si autonome qu’elle soit. Et là où ces conditions ne sont pas réalisées, la technique avorte [21]. Une technique n’est jamais un simple savoir-faire, expliquait-il quelques années plus tard, c’est tout ce qui l’a conditionné : nos mœurs, notre culture, notre organisation sociale, et un certain mode de raisonnement sur les relations entre l’homme et la société [22]. Quant au système technique de Bertrand Gille, Pierre Musso rappelle qu’il est autant technique que culturel, que les techniques elles-mêmes sont inscrites dans une culture. Musso affirme d’ailleurs que lui-même ne part jamais de la technique pour penser le futur, ce qui est aussi a priori notre cas. On pourrait d’ailleurs ajouter qu’à ce réseau d’interdépendance technologique, correspond une interdépendance générale [23]. Ainsi, le professeur à Telecom ParisTech rappelle-t-il avec raison que ce n’est pas l’imprimerie qui a fait la Renaissance, mais bien l’inverse [24], ni d’ailleurs l’ordinateur et l’internet qui généré la Guerre froide et les affrontements géopolitiques qui y sont liés. Mettons au crédit du président du World Economic Forum, Klaus Schwab, d’écrire dans son ouvrage sur The Fourth Industrial Revolution, qu’il la voit comme systémique et que – note-t-il – la technologie n’y est pas considérée comme une force exogène. Cela n’empêche que toute sa démonstration, comme beaucoup d’exercice du genre, soit technology-pushed [25].

Comme aurait pu le faire Jean-Paul Sartre, Musso qualifie le numérique de « baillon sonore » : un baillon médiatique, qui empêche de comprendre où se produit réellement la « grande transformation » contemporaine entamée dans les années 1980. Il faut, écrit-il, passer de mots emblèmes à la compréhension d’un processus industriel profond, « l’informatisation », et même la « téléinformatisation », comme nouvelle phase de l’industrialisation. La téléinformatisation est caractérisée par deux mutations anthropologiques de longue période. D’une part, une extension, un élargissement de toutes les activités et une augmentation des choses et des êtres par la téléinformatisation. (…) D’autre part, une « Grande Transformation », profonde, marquée par l’informatisation et l’automatisation qui oblige pour la première fois dans l’histoire à concevoir, à explorer et à s’aventurer dans des mondes artificiels, construits [26].

L’analyse rejoint celle que développait Gérard Valenduc près de trente ans auparavant lorsqu’il dénonçait les miracles californiens ou japonais dont la Wallonie se saisissait à son sens trop rapidement comme autant de mythes et de fantasmes technologiques. Le chercheur à la Fondation Travail-Université mettait fortement en doute la capacité de la Région wallonne de guérir les structures industrielles de la Wallonie, frappées d’obsolescence, par une cure intensive de nouvelles technologies inspirées d’une Silicon Valley, berceau du microprocesseur et des manipulations génétiques. Pour une région comme la nôtre, écrivait Valenduc, il n’y a pas de remède miracle. Aucun scénario de modernisation technologique ne pourra faire table rase d’un passé économique et social aussi riche que pesant [27]. Pierre Chaunu, déjà cité, aurait pu compléter en répétant ce qu’il écrivait deux ans plus tard en préface de l’ouvrage de François Caron : les phantasmes pseudo-scientifiques qui nous assiègent découragent l’effort. Il n’y a de destin implacable qu’en nous-mêmes [28]. Ainsi, la Révolution technologique ne saurait remplacer le récit commun, apte à rassembler, producteur de loyautés, que Jean Viard déplore ne plus exister chez ceux qui, selon le sociologue français, administrent plus qu’ils ne gouvernent [29].

C’est la raison essentielle pour laquelle nous nous devons de rester lucide. Avec Jean Tirole, nous pensons que le numérique représente de réelles occasions de faire progresser la société, mais aussi qu’il introduit de nouveaux dangers et en amplifie d’autres [30]. Gardons au numérique la place qui doit être la sienne dans le système d’innovation, mais ne pensons pas que la technologie constitue l’alpha et l’omega de notre avenir. Dans le présent, c’est l’être humain en société qui doit constituer la référence de tout horizon à construire.

Philippe Destatte

https://twitter.com/PhD2050

[1] Ce qui est sûr, écrit Jean Viard à notre grande surprise, c’est que la révolution numérique est une partie de la solution à nos problèmes nouveaux, mais avec des constructions culturelles neuves. Jean VIARD, Le moment est venu de penser à l’avenir, p. 34sv, La Tour d’Aigues, L’Aube, 2016.

[2] Mars, La nouvelle Terre promise, dans Le Vif-L’Express, 30 octobre 2015.

[3] Jeremy RIFKIN, The Third Industrial Revolution, How Lateral Power is transforming Energy, The Economy and the World, New York, Palgrave MacMillan, 2011. – Sur ces questions de changement de paradigmes sociétaux, voir Philippe DESTATTE & Pascale VAN DOREN, Foresight as a Tool to Stimulate Societal Paradigm Shift, European and Regional Experiences, in Martin POTUCEK, Pavel NOVACEK and Barbora SLINTAKOVA ed., The First Prague Workshop on Futures Studies Methodology, p. 91-105, CESES Papers, 11, Prague, 2004.

[6] Muriel DE VERICOURT, Usines intelligentes : la quatrième révolution industrielle, dans Industrie et technologies, 6 mars 2014, http://www.industrie-techno.com/usines-intelligentes-la-quatrieme-revolution-industrielle.28373 – voir aussi Michèle DEBONNEUIL, Et si on entrait dans la quatrième révolution industrielle ? Tribune, dans Variances, n° 50, ENSAE, ParisTech, Mai 2014. http://www.ensae.org/global/gene/link.php?doc_id=1275&fg=1

[7] Dorothée KOHLER & Jean-Daniel WEISZ, Industrie 4.0, ou l’avenir de l’industrie en Allemagne : vision, enjeux, méthodes, Notes d’analyse, Kohler C&C, 31 mai 2013, p. 6.

[8] Dieter SPATH, Oliver GANSCHAR, Stefan GERLACH, Moritz HÄMMERLE, Tobias KRAUSE, Sebastian SCHLUND, Produktionsabeit der Zukunft – Industrie 4.0, Stuttgart, Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitwirtschaft und Organisation – IAO, 2013.

[10] 4th Industrial Revolution, An Opportunity for EU to take the lead ?, Brussels, European Economic and Social Committee,14/11/2014.http://www.eesc.europa.eu/?i=portal.fr.events-and-activities-fourth-industrial-revolution

[11] Eric LABAYE (McKinsey Global Institute Analysis), Perspectives on Manufacturing, Disruptives technologies, and Industry 4.0, Brussels, EESC, Consultative Commission on Industrial Change, Nov. 14, 2014.http://www.eesc.europa.eu/resources/docs/labaye.pdf

[12] Industrie 4.0 : slogan marketing ou vraie révolution industrielle ? Paris, La Fabrique d’industrie, 2 juin 2015.http://www.la-fabrique.fr/Actualite/industrie-4-0-slogan-marketing-ou-vraie-revolution-industrielle

[13] La Wallonie au futur, Vers un nouveau paradigme, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 1989.

[14] Philippe DESTATTE dir., Mission prospective Wallonie 21, La Wallonie à l’écoute de la prospective, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 2003.

[15] François BOURDONCLE, La révolution Big Data, dans Pierre VELTZ et Thierry WEIL, L’industrie, notre avenir, p. 64-69, Paris, Eyrolles-La Fabrique de l’Industrie, Colloque de Cerisy, 2015.

[16] Tirer parti de la Révolution numérique, Enjeux, 2017-2027, Paris, France-Stratégie, p. 2, Mars 2016.

[17] Dorothée KOHLER et Jean-Daniel WEISZ, Industrie 4.0, Les défis de la transformation numérique du modèle industriel allemand, p. 11, Paris, La Documentation française, 2016.

[18] Fr. CARON, Les deux Révolutions industrielles du XXème siècle…, p. 19.

[19] Ph. DESTATTE, Le Nouveau Paradigme industriel, Blog PhD2050, Namur, 19 octobre 2014.

Le Nouveau Paradigme industriel : une grille de lecture

[20] Chris ANDERSON, Makers, The New Industrial Revolution, New York, Crown Business, 2012.

[21] J. ELLUL, Le système technicien…, p. 42.

[22] Intervention à Bordeaux en 1985, rapportée par Pierre DROUIN, Que transfère-t-on avec les techniques, dans Le Monde Economie, 20 mars 1985, p. 19.

[23] Wassily LEONTIEF, The structure of American economy, 1919-1929, An empirical application of equilibrium analysis, Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1941. – F. CARON, op. cit., p. 21.

[24] Elizabeth EISENSTEIN, The printing press as an agent of change: communications and cultural transformations in early modern Europe, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1979.

[25] Klaus SCHWAB, The Fourth Industrial Revolution, p. 4 & 9, Geneva, World Economic Forum, 2016.

[26] Pierre MUSSO, « Révolution numérique » et « société de la connaissance », dans Ena Hors Les Murs, 1er avril 2014, p. 47-49.

[27] Gérard VALENDUC, Wallonie et nouvelles technologies : du phantasme à la reconversion, dans Le Soir, L’Economie aujourd’hui, 19 août 1983, p. A.

[28] Fr. CARON, Le résistible déclin des sociétés industrielles…, p. 13.

[29] Jean VIARD, Le moment est venu…, p. 66.

[30] Jean TIROLE, Economie du bien commun, p. 563, Paris, PuF, 2016.

Namur, le 1er août 2015 (*)

Considérons que l’ambiguïté consiste, pour un concept ou une idée, à faire l’objet de plusieurs sens possibles, ce qui en rend l’interprétation incertaine. C’est à peu près ce que nous en dit le dictionnaire Robert de la langue française (2008).

On dispose, depuis l’ouvrage de Guy Baudelle, Catherine Guy et Bernadette Mérenne-Schoumaker, d’une approche conceptuelle solide du développement territorial. Celui-ci y est conçu comme un processus volontariste cherchant à accroître la compétitivité des territoires en impliquant les acteurs dans le cadre d’actions concertées généralement transversales et souvent à forte dimension spatiale [1]. L’intérêt de cette définition, c’est qu’elle est largement expliquée et développée et que cet effort nous permet de pénétrer directement au cœur de notre sujet. Soulignant la proximité des deux notions d’attractivité et de compétitivité territoriales, et les articulant en référence aux travaux de Roberto Camagni [2], les auteurs indiquent que l’élément crucial pour toute politique de développement réside donc dans la construction d’une vision partagée du futur, bien ancrée dans les spécificités et les vocations de l’économie locale : un plan d’action collective et de coopération entre public et privé, une démarche stratégique qui puisse maximiser les synergies locales et valoriser le rôle de chaque acteur [3].

Cette approche est tout sauf anodine. Non seulement, elle nous renvoie à l’analyse des systèmes territoriaux d’innovation mais elle nous fait aussi plonger au centre de la démarche prospective, au cœur des difficultés de la gouvernance territoriale en général et de celle de la Wallonie en particulier. Ce sont ces trois champs que je vais brièvement évoquer.

 

1. L’analyse territoriale de l’innovation

La qualité principale de l’idée de développement territorial vient du fait qu’elle a vocation à reconnecter fondamentalement l’aménagement du territoire avec le développement, donc avec les ressources qui le fondent. Ressources notamment d’acquisitions progressives, indiquent bien Baudelle et alii, matérielles et immatérielles : entrepreneuriat, technologies, innovation, cadre de vie, qui fondent l’attractivité et la compétitivité [4]. Camagni rappelait en 2005 – et cela n’a pas changé dix ans plus tard, malgré l’échec du processus de Lisbonne – que le défi dans lequel nous nous inscrivons est celui de la société de la connaissance (science based development) : savoir-faire et compétence, éducation et culture de base, investissement en recherche scientifique et en recherche-développement, capacité entrepreneuriale, etc. Le spécialiste des milieux innovateurs, insistait une nouvelle fois sur l’importance des interactions et des synergies entre tous ces éléments, sur l’accessibilité aux réseaux et nœuds de communication et de transport, en particulier cognitifs, mais surtout sur l’apprentissage collectif des acteurs. Le professeur au Politecnico di Milano relevait le rôle central joué par le territoire, notamment dans les processus de construction des connaissances, des codes interprétatifs, des modèles de coopération et de décision sur lesquels se fondent les parcours innovateurs des entreprises ainsi que dans les processus de croissance « socialisée » des connaissances [5]. Enfin, Camagni indiquait que la logique des pôles de compétitivité, en tant que rapprochement entre industrie, centres de recherche et universités dans la construction par le bas de projets de développement productif avancé, combiné à une vision générale du futur du territoire, était cohérente avec le schéma qu’il avait présenté.

L’innovation, elle aussi se territorialise, ainsi que l’avait jadis argumenté le Commissaire européen à la recherche, Philippe Busquin [6]. Tout paysage habité par les hommes porte la marque de leurs techniques, rappelait plus tard Bernard Pecqueur en citant la contribution d’André Fel dans L’histoire des techniques de Bertrand Gille [7]. Tentant d’appréhender le système contemporain, ce dernier notait que les techniques nouvelles, en particulier la Révolution électronique, – nous dirions peut-être aujourd’hui numérique mais il s’agit de la même chose – rompait les équilibres spatiaux, modifiait les cadres d’existence, ce qui constitue à la fois, dans la terminologie des géographes, les paysages et les genres de vie [8]. On retrouve ainsi le discours des milieux innovateurs, du GREMI [9], auquel se réfère Pecqueur, des dynamiques territorialisées du changement, de la corrélation entre innovation et espace construit [10], du fait que l’entreprise innovante ne préexiste pas. Ce sont les milieux territoriaux qui la génèrent. Comme l’écrivait Philippe Aydalot, le passé des territoires, leur organisation, leur capacité à générer un projet commun, le consensus qui les structure sont à la base de l’innovation [11]. Quant aux autres variables qu’il mentionne comme facteurs d’innovativité, – accès à la connaissance technologique, présence de savoir-faire, composition du marché du travail, etc. – elles peuvent être activées par les acteurs du territoire.

En fait, ce sont toutes ces réalités que l’idée de développement territorial embarque. Considérant qu’il s’agissait d’un nouveau regard, le Québécois Bruno Jean notait d’ailleurs dès 2006 qu’une plus grande connaissance des rapports entre les territoires et l’innovation (technique, culturelle, socioinstitutionnelle), définie plus largement, s’impose [12].

Ce surcroît de connaissance passe assurément par une approche plus systémique qui constitue probablement le fil le plus tangible reliant les travaux de Bertrand Gille ou de Jacques Ellul sur le système technique [13], les systèmes d’innovation et ceux sur le développement territorial qui se veut, in fine, un développement essentiellement durable [14]. Ce qui ne signifie nullement qu’il limiterait son champ d’action aux trois finalités économiques, sociales et environnementales. On se souviendra que l’économiste Ignacy Sachs, conseiller spécial du secrétaire général de l’ONU pour les conférences sur l’Environnement, voyait cinq dimensions à la durabilité ou plutôt à l’écodéveloppement, concept qu’il préférait : la dimension sociale permettant une autre croissance, une autre vision de la société, économique impliquant une meilleure répartition et une meilleure gestion des ressources, avec plus d’efficacité, écologique afin de minimiser les atteintes aux systèmes naturels, spatiale permettant un équilibre ville-campagne adéquat, un meilleur aménagement du territoire, culturelle ouvrant à une pluralité de solutions locales qui respectent la continuité culturelle ([15]).

Plutôt que la conception trifonctionnelle qui nous a toujours paru étroite, la vision du Rapport Brundtlandt, plus ouverte encore que celle de l’écodéveloppement, s’inscrit précisément dans une dynamique systémique, articulant ce que nous identifions comme autant de sous-systèmes :

– un système politique qui assure la participation effective des citoyens à la prise de décisions,

– un système économique capable de dégager des excédents et de créer des compétences techniques sur une base soutenue et autonome,

– un système social capable de trouver des solutions aux tensions nées d’un développement déséquilibré,

– un système de production qui respecte l’obligation de préserver la base écologique en vue du développement,

– un système technologique toujours à l’affût de solutions nouvelles,

– un système international qui favorise des solutions soutenables en ce qui concerne les échanges et le financement, et

– un système administratif souple capable de s’autocorriger.

La richesse de cette approche [16], non limitative mais généralement négligée, est extraordinaire car elle fonde l’approche systémique des politiques de développement durable. En outre, le paragraphe 15 du Rapport Brundtlandt valorise le développement durable comme processus de changement, de transformation et ouvre la porte vers des finalités globales et des enjeux complémentaires. Ainsi qu’il l’indique : dans son esprit même, le développement durable est un processus de transformation dans lequel l’exploitation des ressources, la direction des investissements, l’orientation des techniques et les changements institutionnels se font de manière harmonieuse et renforcent le potentiel présent et à venir permettant de mieux répondre aux besoins et aspirations de l’humanité [17].

Développement territorial, développement durable et prospective apparaissent donc comme des instruments de même nature si on les fonde sur des approches systémiques, si on les inscrit dans le long terme et si on les considère comme de réels vecteurs de transformation.

2. La prospective et ses ambiguïtés

Lors des travaux du programme Foresight 2.0 du Collège européen de Prospective territoriale, le spécialiste allemand de l’innovation régionale Günter Clar (Steinbeis Europa Zentrum à Stuttgart) avait mis en évidence l’une des qualités de la prospective qui permet de lever l’ambiguïté, de clarifier les enjeux par l’analyse et la mise en délibération des concepts. Néanmoins, la prospective elle-même reste l’objet d’ambiguïtés, d’interprétations diverses, voire de dévoiement, c’est-à-dire de détournement de sa finalité, de son projet, de sa vocation initiale. Les retours aux sources qui ont eu lieu ces dernières années, notamment au travers des thèses de doctorat de Fabienne Goux-Baudiment [18], de Philippe Durance [19] ou de Chloë Vidal [20], ont néanmoins constitué des efforts majeurs pour rappeler les fondements de la prospective et reconstruire le lien entre l’activité prospective présente dans les travaux des grands pionniers et, parmi ceux-ci, le premier de tous en France, Gaston Berger. Ces recherches confortent les quelques idées simples que je voudrais rappeler. Chacune pose, avec Gaston Berger, la prospective comme une rationalité cognitive et politique, dont la finalité est normative [21]. Comme l’écrit Chloë Vidal, la philosophie de Berger se constitue comme une science de la pratique prospective dont la finalité est normative : elle est orientée vers le travail des valeurs et la construction d’un projet politique ; elle est une « philosophie en action » [22]. Le professeur Philippe De Villé tenait déjà ce discours lors du colloque européen que organisé par l’Institut Destrée au Château de Seneffe en 2002 [23].

Ainsi, il n’est de prospective que stratégique. On sait que le choix d’un Michel Godet ou d’un Peter Bishop d’adosser l’adjectif stratégique (strategic) au mot prospective (foresight) n’implique pas qu’il existerait une prospective qui ne serait pas stratégique. Comme nous l’avons montré dans le cadre des travaux de la Mutual Learning Platform, réalisés pour la Commission européenne (DG Entreprise, DG Recherche, DG Politiques régionales) et pour le Comité des Régions [24], outre sa finalité stratégique, tout processus prospectif contient – ou devrait contenir – une phase stratégique destinée à concrétiser le passage à l’action.

Ce positionnement normatif a deux implications qu’il faut sans cesse rappeler. La première est le renoncement initial et définitif de la prospective à toute ambition cognitive de l’avenir. On a beau répéter que la prospective n’est pas la prévision, cela n’empêche pas d’entendre – jusque dans le discours de ministres wallons – qu’aucun prospectiviste n’avait prévu ceci ou cela. L’avenir ne peut être prévu puisqu’il dépend largement – et dans certains cas essentiellement – de la volonté des femmes et des hommes.

La deuxième implication est que la prospective n’est pas une science, même si, comme la recherche historique, par exemple, elle fait appel à la critique des sources et utilise des méthodes d’investigation qu’elle veut rigoureuses, sinon scientifiques. Sa légitimité scientifique ne peut donc être invoquée comme elle l’est pour d’autres disciplines comme la sociologie, l’économie ou le droit – parfois abusivement du reste… Les méthodes elles-mêmes paraissent parfois se couvrir d’une scientificité vertueuse, comme c’est le cas pour la méthode classique française des scénarios. L’ordonnancement rationnel qui se dégage de sa pratique laisse souvent accroire que la méthode aurait un caractère scientifique et que, dès lors, ses résultats seraient porteurs d’une légitimité de cette nature. Il n’en est rien. Que l’on répète l’exercice à un autre moment, avec d’autres acteurs, d’autres variables émergeront, analyses structurelle et morphologique seront différentes, et les scénarios configurés autrement. L’intérêt de la méthode n’est d’ailleurs – et ce n’est pas rien – que de faire émerger des enjeux et de concevoir des alternatives. Les premiers comme les seconds sont des objets subjectifs puisqu’ils résultent du choix des participants à l’exercice qui accepteront – ou non – de s’en saisir. Là réside toute la puissance de la prospective : c’est la capacité, pour celles et ceux qui s’y adonnent, de construire des trajectoires différentes du chemin qu’on les invite à suivre naturellement, d’identifier des avenirs plus conformes à leurs valeurs et à leurs aspirations, et de se donner les moyens de les atteindre.

Cela ne signifie évidemment pas qu’il faille renoncer à une forte affirmation déontologique d’indépendance scientifique, comme nous l’avions fait avec Jean Houard en 2002 en rappelant que la prospective ne peut s’inscrire que dans une logique d’autonomie intellectuelle et éthique. Dans la foulée, Thierry Gaudin avait d’ailleurs souligné que la liberté de penser, en matière de prospective, est indispensable [25].

Ajoutons ensuite que la prospective se fonde sur l’intelligence collective et que, dès lors, on ne l’utilise pas en solitaire.

Notons, pour finir trop rapidement avec cet aspect, que, la prospective territoriale étant une prospective appliquée au territoire comme la prospective industrielle l’est à l’industrie, elle ne saurait échapper aux règles générales de la prospective.

La prospective dans la gouvernance wallonne

A plusieurs reprises déjà, il nous a été donné d’évoquer le travail de prospective réalisé par l’Institut Destrée dans le cadre de la révision du SDER [26]. Celui-ci a porté sur deux aspects. Le premier a consisté en l’élaboration de scénarios exploratoires sur base du volumineux diagnostic élaboré par la Conférence permanente du Développement territorial (CPDT), le second à préparer la construction d’une vision commune des acteurs wallons.

Beaucoup a été dit sur les scénarios du SDER. Elaborés très en amont de la démarche, ils étaient à leur place pour ouvrir une réflexion sur les enjeux plus que pour esquisser des stratégies qui ne doivent jamais constituer que des réponses à ces questions, lorsqu’elles ont auront été bien posées. Malgré nos efforts, cette articulation a été assez déficiente, probablement par manque de maturité prospective des acteurs interpellés. Malgré la qualité du résultat de ces scénarios, ceux-ci ont souffert de plusieurs biais. Le plus important sur le plan méthodologique est probablement le refus du ministre en charge de l’Aménagement du Territoire d’associer les acteurs concernés au delà de la CPDT et de l’Administration régionale. Dans une logique de développement territorial, la mise à l’écart de l’élaboration des scénarios d’acteurs aussi majeurs que l’Union wallonne des Entreprises ou Inter-Environnement Wallonie, sous prétexte qu’ils auraient ultérieurement leur mot à dire dans la consultation qui était programmée, n’avait pas de sens. Là aussi, l’idée d’établir des documents qui puissent fonder une pseudo légitimité scientifique l’a emporté sur la bonne gouvernance régionale qui se doit d’impliquer les acteurs selon le modèle bien connu du PNUD [27]. Or, la co-construction d’une politique publique, voire de bien commun, par l’ensemble des parties-prenantes a peu à voir avec les mécanismes de consultation et de concertation où le jeu joué par les acteurs est d’une toute autre nature.

La seconde implication de l’Institut Destrée dans la révision du SDER portait sur la construction d’une vision commune et partagée. Nous avons eu l’occasion, à plusieurs reprises et notamment dans le cadre du colloque du 2 mars 2012 [28], de confirmer l’importance et les conditions de l’élaboration d’une telle vision. Au delà des questions de la gouvernance multi-niveaux, de l’interterritorialité wallonnes et de ce que nous avions appelé la subsidiarité active, il s’agissait aussi de contribuer à mettre en place un projet concret et global pour la Wallonie.

A ce point de vue, les travaux de Wallonie 2030 menés par le Collège régional de prospective pouvaient servir de feuille de route. Le rapport général du 25 mars 2011 indiquait que le travail sur les territoires était d’abord, pour la Wallonie, un modèle de processus de mobilisation des acteurs et de mise en place d’un mécanisme de changement au niveau territorial. Alors que, partout, des lieux d’interactions se mettaient en place sous la forme de Conseil de Développement ou de Partenariat stratégique local, permettant de lancer des dynamiques d’innovation supracommunales et d’appuyer les communes dans leur travail de résolution des problèmes, un référentiel territorial régional intégré, pouvait être construit comme plan stratégique d’ensemble qui rassemble à la fois la vision territoriale (le SDER) et le développement économique et social (le Plan prioritaire wallon) ainsi que des plans de secteurs rénovés face au défi climatique et aux perspectives énergétiques. Cette façon de faire constituait selon nous la meilleure manière d’assurer la cohérence entre les politiques régionales ou communautaires sectorielles territorialisées et les dynamiques intercommunales ou supracommunales [29].

Si un séminaire avait été fixé au 20 mars 2013 afin de nourrir la vision du SDER en intelligence collective à partir des acteurs régionaux, c’est-à-dire de manière ouverte, transparente, contradictoire, avec l’objectif de produire un texte puis de le soumettre à débat, cette réunion a finalement été annulée à la demande du ministre. Nous avons pu constater que les mêmes freins ont empêché la production d’une vision régionale dans le cadre tant de la Stratégie régionale de Développement durable (SRDD) que dans celui de la démarche Horizon 2022.

Conclusion : des territoires de citoyen-ne-s

Il est des régions et des territoires, notamment aux États-Unis et en Europe [30], en particulier en France mais aussi en Wallonie, où la prospective territoriale a pu se déployer pleinement, les élus et les acteurs, ayant dépassé les ambiguïtés que nous évoquions et bien compris la nature de la prospective, l’intérêt du développement durable et ce qui peut en résulter pour le développement territorial. Nous pouvons en témoigner par exemple pour ce qui concerne les Côtes d’Armor, la Basse-Normandie, le Nord – Pas-de-Calais ou le Cœur du Hainaut. Dans beaucoup d’autres lieux, l’ambiguïté persiste et reste un rempart empêchant la bonne compréhension de ces conceptions simples qui fondent les processus délibératifs et le management territorial participatif.

Mais, ne pensons pas qu’il s’agisse de questions technocratiques. Au contraire, ces ambiguïtés affectent non seulement l’efficience du développement mais aussi la démocratie. Les territoires dont nous avons besoin doivent être, comme l’indiquait Yves Hanin en mai 2012, des territoires de citoyens [31]. Leur participation, mais aussi celles des entreprises, des chercheur-e-s et des fonctionnaires, à la nouvelle gouvernance est en effet essentielle. La prospective peut appuyer le développement territorial. Pour autant que l’on comprenne bien ce qu’elle recouvre concrètement.

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

(*) Cet article a été publié une première fois dans Yves HANIN dir., Cinquante ans d’action territoriale : un socle, des pistes pour le futur, p. 153-163, Louvain-la-Neuve, Presses universitaires de Louvain, 2015.

[1] Guy BAUDELLE, Catherine GUY et Bernadette MERENNE-SCHOUMAKER, Le développement territorial en Europe, Concepts, enjeux et débats, p. 18, 246, Rennes, PuR, 2011.

[2] Roberto CAMAGNI, Attractivité et compétitivité : un binôme à repenser, dans Territoires 2030, n°1, p. 11-15, Paris, DATAR-La Documentation française, 2005.

[3] Guy BAUDELLE, Catherine GUY et Bernadette MERENNE-SCHOUMAKER, op. cit., p. 19.

[4] Gros mot s’il en est. Je me souviens de la difficulté d’utiliser ce concept, à la DATAR même, au moment de la publication de l’article de Camagni, de la création des pôles du même nom, et où cette auguste institution se transformait pourtant en DIACT.

[5] R. CAMAGNI, op. cit., p. 14.

[6] Achilleas MITSOS, The Territorial Dimension of Research and Development Policy, Regions in European Research Area, Valencia, Feb. 23, 2001, http://ec.europa.eu/research/area/regions.html

[7] André FEL, La géographie et les techniques, dans Bertrand GILLE dir., Histoire des Techniques, Technique et civilisations, Technique et Sciences, p. 1062, coll. La Pléade, Paris, Gallimard, 1978.

[8] B. GILLE, Histoire des Techniques…, p. 914.

[9] Groupe de Recherche européen sur les Milieux innovateurs, fondé en 1984 par Philippe Aydalot. Voir notamment Denis MAILLAT, Michel QUEVIT, Lanfranco SENN, Réseaux d’innovation et milieux innovateurs : un pari pour le développement régional, Neuchâtel, GREMI, IRER, EDES, Neuchâtel,1993. – Pascale VAN DOREN et M. QUEVIT, Stratégies d’innovation et référents territoriaux, dans Revue d’Economie industrielle, n°64, 1993, p. 38-53. – Muriel TABORIES, Les apports du GREMI à l’analyse territoriale de l’innovation ou 20 ans de recherche sur les milieux innovateurs, Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences économiques, Paris, 2005, 18, 22 p.

[10] Bernard PECQUEUR, Le tournant territorial de l’économie globale, dans Espaces et sociétés, 2006/2, n°124-125, p. 17-32.

[11] Philippe AYDALOT éd., Présentation de Milieux innovateurs en Europe, p. 10, Paris, GREMI, 1986.

[12] Bruno JEAN, Le développement territorial : un nouveau regard sur les régions du Québec, Recherches sociographiques, vol. 47, n°3, 2006, p. 472.

[13] B. GILLE, La notion de « système technique », Essai d’épistémologie technique, dans Culture technique, Paris, CNRS, 1979, 1-8, p. 8-18. – Jacques ELLUL, Le système technicien, Paris, Le Cherche Midi, 2012 (1ère éd., 1977).

[14] G. BAUDELLE, C. GUY, B. MERENNE-SCHOUMAKER, Le développement territorial en Europe…, p. 21.

[15] Ignacy SACHS, Le Développement durable ou l’écodéveloppement : du concept à l’action, 1994. –Stratégies de l’écodéveloppement, Paris, Editions ouvrières, 1980. – L’écodéveloppement, Stratégies de transition vers le XXIème siècle, Paris, Syros, 1993. – Quelles villes pour quel développement ?, Paris, Puf, 1996.

[16] voir Philippe DESTATTE, Foresight: A Major Tool in tackling Sustainable Development, in Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Volume 77, Issue 9, November 2010, p. 1575-1587.

[17] Commission mondiale sur l’environnement et le développement, Notre avenir à tous, Québec, Editions du Fleuve et Publications du Québec, 1988.– Our Common Future, Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development, UNEP, 1987, A/42/427. http://www.un-documents.net/wced-ocf.htm

[18] Fabienne GOUX-BAUDIMENT, Une nouvelle étape du développement de la prospective : la prospective opérationnelle, Thèse pour l’obtention du doctorat en prospective, Université pontificale grégorienne de Rome, Facultés des Sciences sociales, 2002.

[19] Philippe DURANCE, Gaston Berger et la prospective. Genèse d’une idée, Thèse de doctorat, Paris, Conservatoire national des Arts et Métiers, 2009.

[20] Chloë VIDAL, La prospective territoriale dans tous ses états, Rationalités, savoirs et pratiques de la prospective (1957-2014), Thèse de doctorat, Lyon, Ecole normale supérieure, 2015.

[21] Ch. VIDAL, La prospective territoriale dans tous ses états…, p. 95. – Ph. DURANCE, Gaston Berger et la prospective p.189. – F. GOUX-BAUDIMENT, op. cit., p. 310.

[22] Ch. VIDAL, op. cit., p. 31

[23] Ph. DESTATTE et Pascale VAN DOREN dir., La prospective territoriale comme outil de gouvernance, Territorial Foresight as a Tool of Governance, p. 123, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 2003.

[24] Günter CLAR & Philippe DESTATTE, Regional Foresight, Boosting Regional Potential, Mutual Learning Platform Regional Foresight Report, Luxembourg, European Commission, Committee of the Regions and Innovative Regions in Europe Network, 2006.

http://www.institut-destree.eu/Documents/Reseaux/Günter-CLAR_Philippe-DESTATTE_Boosting-Regional-Potential_MLP-Foresight-2006.pdf

[25] Ph. DESTATTE, Problématique de la prospective territoriale, dans Ph. DESTATTE et P. VAN DOREN, op. cit., p. 154.

[26] Notamment : M. VAN CUTSEM et Charlotte DEMULDER, Territoires wallons : horizons 2040, Quels scénarios pour l’aménagement du territoire wallon à l’horizon 2040 ?, Namur, Direction générale de l’Aménagement du Territoire, du Logement, du Patrimoine et de l’Energie, 7 novembre 2011, http://www.wallonie-en-ligne.net/Wallonie_Prospective/SDER_Territoires-wallons_Scenarios-2040.htm – Ph. DESTATTE, Du diagnostic aux scénarios exploratoires, mise en prospective des enjeux du SDER, Intervention au Colloque de la CPDT, le 21 novembre 2011, dans Territoires wallons : horizons 2040, p. 41-53, Namur, CPDT, Juin 2012.

Cliquer pour accéder à Philippe-Destatte_CPDT_SDER_2011-11-21ter.pdf

[27] Ph. DESTATTE, Bonne gouvernance : contractualisation, évaluation et prospective, Trois atouts pour une excellence régionale, dans Ph. DESTATTE dir., Evaluation, prospective et développement régional, p. 7-50, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 2001.

[28] Ph. DESTATTE et Michaël VAN CUTSEM dir., Quelle(s) vision(s) pou le territoire wallon, Les territoires dialoguent avec leur région, Namur, Institut Destrée, 2013.

[29] Ph. DESTATTE, Wallonie 2030, Quelles seraient les bases d’un contrat sociétal pour une Wallonie renouvelée ? Rapport général du congrès du 25 mars 2011 au Palais des Congrès de Namur.

Cliquer pour accéder à Philippe-Destatte_Wallonie2030_Rapport-General_2011-03-25_Final_ter.pdf

[30] Ph. DESTATTE, Oihana HERNAEZ, Corinne ROELS, Michaël VAN CUTSEM, An initial assessment of territorial forward planning / foresight projects in the European Union, Brussels, Committee of the Regions, Nov. 2011, 450 p.

[31] Yves HANIN, Exposé introductif à la table ronde « Une mise en œuvre complémentaire, cohésive, efficiente » ? dans Ph. DESTATTE et M. VAN CUTSEM, Quelle(s) vision(s) pour le(s) territoire(s) wallons(s)…, p. 150.

 Namur, February 1st,  2014

From anticipation to action is a foundational book for the prospectivist approach, penned by Michel Godet in 1994 [1]. With a preface by the American futurist Joseph F. Coates, that book was the first version of what would become, through subsequent field experiences, the well-known handbook of “strategic prospective” [2]. The work, published by UNESCO, brought to the forefront one of the trademarks of the disciple of Jacques Lesourne, who was also his successor in the chair of Industrial Foresight at the Conservatoire national des Arts et Métiers (CNAM) in Paris: the famous Greek triangle that appeared on the cover of the French edition of that work (1991). This pedagogical diagram highlights and forms a relationship among three essential components of the attitude and process of foresight: anticipation, which favours long term thinking, intellectual and affective appropriation of the challenges and the responses for meeting them, the strategic will that is expressed in collective and adequate actions. The lesson taught by Michel Godet is that the transition from anticipation to strategic action cannot occur without the insight, mobilisation and appropriation of the foresight process by the parties involved.

Anticipation, appropriation and action are key concepts that businesses and organisations attentive to strategic thinking, and thus to foresight, would do well to keep in mind.

Anticipation of my future is constitutive of my present

As Gaston Berger (1896-1960), the father of foresight studies in France, noted citing the French Academician Jules Chaix-Ruy, « the anticipation of my future is constitutive of my present”: it would be impossible in one’s life cut oneself off from these upper reaches which constitute the past and the lower slopes that will be the future. This isolation in effect renders the present absurd [3]. The capacity for anticipation allows us not only to represent a development or event as well as its consequences before it actually occurs, but also and above all to act by preventing or anticipating a favourable or fateful moment. Action, and even reaction, to the knowledge thereby generated is inseparable from anticipation. In terms of foresight, apparently at the initiative of Hasan Ozbekhan (1921-2007) of the University of Pennsylvania [4], the word ‘preactivityis used for cases where the actor takes into consideration possible changes and prepares for them, and the word ‘proactivity’ for when, having identified the advantages of the event or development in question, the actor undertakes a voluntary act intended to bring it about. It was Ozbekhan who also popularised the term ‘anticipation’ within the sphere of foresight, seeing in it “a logically constructed model and concerning a possible future, combined with a degree of confidence that has not yet been defined” [5]. The Austrian astrophysicist Erich Jantsch (1929-1980), who drew largely on its inspiration, equated anticipation with the futuribles’ so dear to Bertrand de Jouvenel or the ‘alternative world futures’ of Herman Kahn [6].

The concept of anticipation is currently the subject of significant efforts at deeper examination and clarification by the futurists Riel Miller (UNESCO), Roberto Poli (UNESCO Chair of Anticipatory Systems, University of Trente) and Pierre Rossel (Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne). Taking the work of the Americans Robert Rosen (1934-1997) [7] and John W. Bennett (1915-2005) [8] as their starting point, these researchers are working closely with the UNESCO’s foresight section to explore the possibility of establishing anticipation as a discipline in its own right, one that brings together a set of competencies enabling human beings to take into account and evaluate future trends [9]. This reflection is certainly lending stimulus to foresight studies, all the more so since it fits well with the efforts of the European Commission to open up foresight research. Thus the Directorate-General for Research and Innovation has for several years been investing in ‘Forward Looking Activities’ (FLA), activities that include foresight [10], just as the European Institute in Seville has done in past years by developing tools for strategic thinking in the area of public policy (‘Strategic Policy Intelligence’ – SPI) [11].

Anticipation is a key resource for businesses, insofar as it distinguishes itself clearly from mere prophetic imagination or forecasting without strategic purpose and includes methods of foresight watch and research in order to turn it into a tool of economic or territorial intelligence.

Appropriating challenges and responses to them: prime factor of change

Intuitively as well as from experience, the head of any organisation knows that steering the company would not be possible from a control tower cut off from the laboratories, workshops and the entire range of services that contribute to its operation, any more than from its external beneficiaries. The dynamics of all development and change are based on interaction, communication and the involvement of every actor. As Michel Crozier observed, resources, especially human ones, do not bend as easily to fit the objectives and ultimately – and fortunately – block any fine rational ordering [12]. It is therefore pragmatism and the reality on the ground that prevail.

Philippe Bernoux has shown that in a vision of change that is not imposed (contrary to Hirshman’s ‘loyalty or exit [13]), two principles are dominant: the autonomy of the actors and the legitimacy they give to decisions that concern them, and which they will express through their « voice« , namely, a voice raised in protest [14]. For Bernoux, author of Sociologie du changement dans les entreprises et les organisations, change means learning new ways of doing, new rules, a ‘learning by assimilation of new rules’. Change can only be a joint product, manufactured by all the actors concerned [15]. Change cannot take place without building new relationships: to change is to make possible the development of new sets of relationships. This adjustment can, moreover, come about only through people who are interrelated and through the systems of relationships which they co-create [16]. Bernoux reminds us that more than the structures of organisations and institutions, it is the interaction among actors that is a key. And that interaction presupposes true autonomy on the part of the actors, even if their scope for action is limited by the existing rules: without their capacity for action, change cannot take place. These actors are thus true agents of the process and cannot be reduced to the role of passive agents [17]. What is more: as the management psychologist Harold J. Leavitt (1922-2007) put it, whatever the power of the agent of change, whatever his or her rank in the hierarchy, the actor who has been changed remains master of the final decision [18]. This observation applies to a business which, while an institution, is also an actor: it always retains the capacity to influence an environment to which it is not subjected, to participate in the social construction of the market, to retain some of its mastery of its interactions with society [19]. Change thus succeeds only if it is accepted, legitimated and transformed by actors responsible for implementing it [20].

Let us stop thinking that we can transform a system while remaining outside it or by taking on the role of ‘grand architect’. It is because the actors are concerned and involved that they will carry out a strategy of change. To do so requires that they be co-creators and share the company’s vision and objectives, the challenges of the environment and the correct responses needed to face them. Collectively.

Action: from aims to the process of transformation

In a famous lecture given at the Centre de Recherches et d’Etudes des Chefs d’Entreprises, Gaston Berger defined true action as a series of movements directed towards a goal; it is not, he said, “an agitation by which we try to make others believe that we are powerful and effective” [21]. As the former director-general of higher education in France rightly observed [22], these goals are first and foremost change and the processes of transformation studied in social psychology. These theories were described by the German-American scholar Kurt Lewin (1890-1947) [23]. Before becoming interested in social change, Lewin developed the experimental study of group dynamics. He worked on the concept of the equilibrium of equal and opposite forces that make it possible to attain a quasi-stationary state. The quest for new equilibrium occurs after a shift in the balance of forces in order to bring about change towards this objective. The process is marked by three stages: first, a period of unfreezing during which the system calls into question its perceptions, habits and behaviours. The actors are motivated. Next comes a period of transition, during which behaviours and attitudes become unstable and contradictory. The actors experiment with and eventually adopt some of them. Finally, there is a period of refreezing in which the system generalises the tentative behaviours that are suited to the new situation and harmonises the new practices.

As Didier Anzieu and Jacques-Yves Martin describe it: “how can one overcome the initial resistance that tends to restore equilibrium to a higher level? By ‘unfreezing’ habits little by little, using non-directive methods of discussion, until the point of rupture, shock, or a different refreezing can occur. In other words, lowering the threshold of resistance and bringing the group to a degree of crisis that produces a shift in attitudes among the group members, and then, by means of influence, among the neighbouring zones of the social fabric” [24].

Berger reminds us: the Americans Lippitt, Watson and Westley [25] pursued this line of inquiry. Thus, they divided the process into seven phases that fit quite well with the stages of a future-oriented process: 1. Developing a need for change, 2. Establishing a network of change relationships, 3. Diagnosing what is at stake in the system, 4. Examining alternative paths and choosing an action plan, 5. Transforming intentions into efforts to change, 6. Generalising and stabilising the change, 7. Determining the final relationships with the change agents. There are other models, used mainly by those futurists who draw upon social psychology and behavioural sociology in order to gain better understanding of the processes of transformation that they observe and to optimise them when they wish to implement them themselves [26].

Conclusion: will and leadership

Strategic plans do not implement themselves, as Professor Peter Bishop of the University of Houston frequently reminds us: “people implement them, and these people are called leaders” [27].

In a debate on the so-called ‘[educational] landscape decree’ held at the Political book fair on 10 November 2013 in Liège, Jean-Claude Marcourt, vice-president of the Government of Wallonia and minister of Economy, New Technologies and Higher Education, stated that “one can be progressive at the level of ideas and conservative when someone proposes the concept of change”. Apart from all ideological considerations of right, left or centre, this formulation is particularly insightful. In the political fraternity, as in the world of business or organisations, strategic capacity is impossible without a true openness to transformation. The latter can and must be driven by a leadership that, in today’s world, must be collective if it is to be effective, even if, from anticipation to action, it comes about under the aegis of men and women who are known for their ability to inspire and catalyse that change.

What brings together government officials and business leaders is the common challenge of motivating willing parties to favour anticipation, and to do so in such a way that they accept both the challenges and the strategy and thus move to take action.

Philippe Destatte

https://twitter.com/PhD2050


[1] Michel GODET, From anticipation to action, A handbook of strategic prospective, coll. Futures-oriented Studies, Paris, Unesco Publishing, 1994. – The French version of this book was published in 1991 by Dunod: De l’anticipation à l’action, Manuel de prospective et de stratégie.

[2] M.GODET, Manuel de prospective stratégique, 2 tomes, Paris, Dunod, 3e éd., 2007.

[3] Gaston BERGER, Le temps (1959) dans Phénoménologie et prospective, p. 198, Paris, PUF, 1964. Jules CHAIX-RUY, Les dimensions de l’être et du temps, Paris-Lyon, Vitte, 1953.

[4] According to Michel Godet, at the ‘Assises de la prospective’, organised by Futuribles at Paris Dauphine, on 8-9 December 1999.-  M. GODET, La boîte à outils de la prospective stratégique, Problèmes et méthodes, coll. Cahier du Lips, p. 14, Paris, CNAM, 5e éd., 2001.

[5] Cited by Eric JANTSCH, La prévision technologique : cadre, techniques et organisation, p. 16, Paris, OCDE, 1967.

[6] « The possibility of acting upon present reality by starting from an imagined or anticipated future situation affords great freedom to the decision maker while at the same time providing him with better controls with which to guide events. Thus, planning becomes in the true sense « future-creative » and the very fact of anticipating becomes causative of action ». (p. 89 & 139)  » Hasan OZBEKHAN, The Triumph of Technology: « can implies ought », in Joseph P. MARTINO, An Introduction to Technological Forecasting, p. 83-92, New York, Gordon & Breach Science publishers, 1972. – Eleonora BARBIERI MASINI, Why Futures Studies?, p. 56, London, Grey Seal, 1993. – Erich JANTSCH, Technological Planning and Social Futures, p. 17 & 37, London, Associated Business Programmes, 2nd ed., 1974. Anticipations are « intellectively constructed models of possible futures ».

[7] Robert ROSEN, Anticipatory Systems, Philosophical, Mathematical and Methodological Foundations, Oxford, Pergamon Press, 1985. – R. ROSEN, Essays on Life itself, New York, Columbia University Press, 2000.

[8] John W. BENNETT, Human Ecology as Human Behavior: Essays in Environmental and Development Anthropology, New Brunswick, NJ, Transaction Publishers, 1993.

[9] Riel MILLER, Roberto POLI & Pierre ROSSEL, The Discipline of Anticipation: Exploring Key Issues, Unesco Working Paper no. 1, Paris, May 2013. http://www.academia.edu/3523348/The_Discipline_of_Anticipation_Miller_Poli_Rossel_-_DRAFT

[10] Domenico ROSSETTI di VALDALBERO & Perla SROUR-GANDON, European Forward Looking Activities, EU Research in Foresight and Forecast, Socio-Economic Sciences & Humanities, List of Activities, Brussels, European Commission, DGR, Directorate L, Science, Economy & Society, 2010. http://ec.europa.eu/research/social-sciences/forward-looking_en.htmlEuropean forward-looking activities, Building the future of « Innovation Union » and ERA, Brussels, European Commission, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation, 2011.

ftp://ftp.cordis.europa.eu/pub/fp7/ssh/docs/european-forward-looking-activities_en.pdf

[11] Alexander TÜBKE, Ken DUCATEL, James P. GAVIGAN, Pietro MONCADA-PATERNO-CASTELLO eds., Strategic Policy Intelligence: Current Trends, the State of the Play and perspectives, S&T Intelligence for Policy-Making Processes, IPTS, Seville, Dec. 2001.

[12] Michel CROZIER, La crise de l’intelligence, Essai sur l’impuissance des élites à se réformer, p. 19, Paris, InterEditions, 1995.

[13] A.O. HIRSCHMAN, Exit, Voice and Loyalty, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press, 1970.

[14] Philippe BERNOUX, Sociologie du changement dans les entreprises et les organisations, p. 10-11, Paris, Seuil, 2010.

[15] Ph. BERNOUX, Sociologie du changement..., p. 191.

[16] Ibidem, p. 11, 85 and 308.

[17] Ibidem, p. 11 and 13.

[18] Harold J. LEAVITT & Homa BAHRAMI, Managerial Psychology, Managing Behavior in Organisations, The University of Chicago Press, 5th ed., 1989.

[19] Ph. BERNOUX, Sociologie du changement…, p. 144.

[20] Ibidem, p. 51.

[21] Gaston BERGER, Le chef d’entreprise, philosophe en action, 8 mars 1955, dans Prospective n°7, Gaston Berger, Un philosophe dans le monde moderne, p. 50, Paris, PUF, Avril 1961.

[22] G. BERGER, L’Encyclopédie française, t. XX : Le Monde en devenir, 1959, p. 12-14, 20, 54, reprinted in Phénoménologie du temps et prospective, p. 271, Paris, PuF, 1964.

[23] Kurt LEWIN, Frontiers in Group Dynamics, in Human Relations, 1947, n° 1, p. 2-38. – K. LEWIN, Psychologie dynamique, Les relations humaines, coll. Bibliothèque scientifique internationale, p. 244sv., Paris, PuF, 1964. – Bernard BURNES, Kurt Lewin and the Planned Approach to change: A Re-appraisal, Journal of Management Studies, septembre 2004, p. 977-1002. – Voir aussi Karl E. WEICK & Robert E. QUINN, Organizational Change and Development, Annual Review of Psychology, 1999, p. 361-386.

[24] Didier ANZIEU et Jacques-Yves MARTIN, La dynamique des groupes restreints, p. 86, Paris, PuF, 2007.

[25] Ronald LIPPITT, Jeanne WATSON & Bruce WESTLEY, The Dynamics of Planned Change, A Comparative Study of Principles and Techniques, New York, Harcourt, Brace & Cie, 1958.

[26] Chris ARGYRIS & Donald A. SCHON, Organizational Learning, A Theory of Action Perspective, Reading, Mass. Addison Wesley, 1978. – Gregory BATESON, Steps to an Ecology of Mind: Collected Essays in Anthropology, Psychiatry, Evolution and Epistemology, University of Chicago Press, 1972. – G. BATESON, Steps to an Ecology of Mind, Collected Essays in Anthropology, Psychiatry, Evolution, and Epistemology, University Of Chicago Press, 1972, reed. 2000. – Jean-Philippe BOOTZ, Prospective et apprentissage organisationnel, coll. Travaux et recherches de prospective, Paris, Futuribles international, LIPSOR, Datar, Commissariat général du Plan, 2001. – Richard A. SLAUGHTER, The Transformative Cycle: a Tool for Illuminating Change, in Richard A. SLAUGHTER, Luke NAISMITH and Neil HOUGHTON, The Transformative Cycle, p. 5-19, Australian Foresight Institute, Swinburne University, 2004.

[27] Peter C. BISHOP and Andy HINES, Teaching about the Future, p. 225, New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.

Hour-en-Famenne, le 31 décembre 2013

From anticipation to action est un livre fondateur de la prospective, dû à la plume de Michel Godet en 1994 [1]. Préfacé par le prospectiviste américain Joseph F. Coates, ce texte constituait la première mouture de ce qui allait devenir, au fil de nouvelles expériences du terrain, le manuel bien connu de prospective stratégique [2]. Ainsi, cet ouvrage, publié par l’UNESCO, valorisait une des marques de fabrique du disciple de Jacques Lesourne et son successeur à la chaire de Prospective industrielle du Conservatoire national des Arts et Métiers à Paris (CNAM) : le fameux triangle grec qui figurait d’ailleurs sur la couverture de l’édition française de ce texte (1991). Ce schéma pédagogique met en évidence et en interrelation trois composantes essentielles de l’attitude et du processus de la prospective : l’anticipation que favorise la réflexion prospective, l’appropriation intellectuelle et affective des enjeux et des réponses à y apporter, la volonté stratégique qui se décline en actions collectives et adéquates. La leçon enseignée par Michel Godet est que le passage de l’anticipation à l’acte stratégique ne peut se passer du sens, de la mobilisation et de l’appropriation du processus prospectif par les parties prenantes.

Anticipation, appropriation et action sont des concepts-clefs que les entreprises et les organisations attentives à l’intelligence stratégique, et donc à la prospective, ont intérêt à avoir à l’esprit.

L’anticipation de mon avenir est constitutive de mon présent

Comme le relevait le pionnier de la prospective Gaston Berger (1896-1960) citant l’académicien Jules Chaix-Ruy, l’anticipation de mon avenir est constitutive de mon présent : on ne saurait dans sa vie se couper de cet amont que constitue le passé et de cet aval que sera  le futur. Cet isolement rendrait le présent absurde [3]. La faculté d’anticipation permet non seulement de se représenter une évolution ou un événement ainsi que ses conséquences avant qu’ils ne se réalisent, mais aussi et surtout d’agir, en prévenant ou en devançant ce moment favorable ou fatidique. L’action, voire la réaction, à cette connaissance générée, est indissociable de l’anticipation. En prospective, à l’initiative semble-t-il de Hasan Ozbekhan (1921-2007) [4], on parle de préactivité lorsque l’acteur prend en considération les changements possibles et qu’il s’y prépare, et de proactivité lorsque, ayant identifié l’intérêt de cet événement ou de cette évolution, il mène une action volontariste destinée à le ou la provoquer. C’est aussi ce professeur à l’Université de Pennsylvanie qui a popularisé le terme d’anticipation dans le monde de la prospective, y voyant un modèle construit logiquement et concernant un avenir possible, assorti d’un degré de confiance non encore défini [5]. L’astrophysicien autrichien Erich Jantsch (1929-1980), qui s’en est considérablement inspiré, assimilait les anticipations aux futuribles chers à Bertrand de Jouvenel ou les alternative world futures d’Herman Kahn [6].

Le concept d’anticipation fait actuellement l’objet d’un effort tangible de clarification et d’approfondissement par les prospectivistes Riel Miller (UNESCO), Roberto Poli (UNESCO Chair of Anticipatory Systems, University of Trente) et Pierre Rossel (Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne). Se basant notamment sur les travaux des Américains Robert Rosen (1934-1997) [7] et John W. Bennett (1915-2005) [8], ces chercheurs réunis autour de la direction de la prospective de l’UNESCO s’interrogent sur la possibilité de fonder explicitement l’anticipation comme une discipline constituant un ensemble de compétences qui permettent aux êtres humains de prendre en compte et d’évaluer des évolutions futures [9]. Cette réflexion est assurément stimulante sur le plan de la prospective d’autant qu’elle rejoint l’effort de la Commission européenne de désenclaver les recherches prospectives. Ainsi, la direction générale de la Recherche et de l’Innovation s’investit-elle de son côté, et depuis plusieurs années, dans les Forward Looking Activities (FLA), les activités à vocation prospective  [10], comme jadis l’Institut européen de Séville l’avait fait en développant, autour de la prospective, les outils d’intelligence stratégique en politiques publiques (Strategic Policy Intelligence – SPI) [11].

L’anticipation, si elle s’écarte résolument de la simple imagination prophétique ou de la prévision sans vocation stratégique, pour intégrer des méthodes de veille et de recherche prospectives et en faire un outil d’intelligence économique ou territoriale, constitue une ressource de premier choix pour l’entreprise.

L’appropriation des enjeux et des réponses à y apporter, premier facteur de changement

Intuitivement mais aussi par expérience, le responsable de toute organisation sait que le pilotage de l’entreprise ne saurait se faire à partir d’une tour de contrôle coupée des laboratoires, des ateliers et de l’ensemble des services qui contribuent à son fonctionnement, pas plus que de ses bénéficiaires extérieurs. Toute dynamique d’évolution, de changement est fondée sur l’interaction, la communication, l’implication de chaque acteur. Comme le rappelait Michel Crozier, les moyens, surtout quand ils sont humains, ne se plient pas aussi facilement aux objectifs et bloquent finalement – et heureusement – la belle ordonnance rationnelle [12]. Ce sont donc le pragmatisme et la réalité du terrain qui prévalent.

Philippe Bernoux a montré que, dans une vision du changement non imposé (différent du loyalty or exit de Hirshman [13]…), deux principes sont prépondérants : l’autonomie des acteurs et la légitimité qu’ils accordent aux décisions les concernant, et qu’ils exprimeront par leur « voice », la prise de parole protestataire [14]. Pour l’auteur de Sociologie du changement dans les entreprises et les organisations, le changement constitue bien un apprentissage de nouvelles manières de faire, de nouvelles règles, un apprentissage par assimilation de nouvelles régulations. Le changement ne peut être que coproduit, fabriqué par tous les acteurs [15]. Le changement ne peut avoir lieu que s’il y a construction de nouvelles relations : changer, c’est rendre possible le développement de nouveaux jeux de relations. Cet ajustement ne peut d’ailleurs être que le fait des personnes en interrelations ainsi que des systèmes de relations qu’elles contribuent à créer [16]. Bernoux rappelle que, plus que les structures des organismes et des institutions, l’interaction entre les acteurs est centrale. Elle suppose l’autonomie réelle des acteurs, même s’ils ne peuvent tout faire puisqu’il y a des règles : sans leur capacité d’action, le changement ne peut avoir lieu. Ainsi, ces acteurs sont-ils de vrais acteurs et ne peuvent être réduits à un rôle d’agents agis [17]. Et même davantage : comme l’indique le psychologue du management Harold J. Leavitt (1922-2007), quel que soit le pouvoir que possède le l’acteur- « changeur », quel que soit son rang dans la hiérarchie, l’acteur « changé » reste maître de la décision finale [18]. Cette observation est valable pour l’entreprise qui, bien qu’institution, est aussi actrice : elle conserve toujours la capacité d’influer sur un environnement auquel elle n’est pas soumise, de participer à la construction sociale du marché, de garder en partie la maîtrise de ses interactions avec la société [19]. Ainsi, les changements ne réussissent que s’ils sont acceptés, légitimés et transformés par les acteurs chargés de les mettre en œuvre [20].

Arrêtons donc de penser que l’on puisse transformer en restant extérieur au système ou en se cantonnant dans un rôle de grand architecte. C’est parce que les acteurs seront concernés et impliqués qu’ils porteront la stratégie du changement. Cela induit qu’ils co-construisent et partagent la vision de l’entreprise, ses finalités, les enjeux de l’environnement et les bonnes réponses à y apporter. Collectivement.

L’action : des finalités au processus de transformation

Dans une célèbre conférence donnée au Centre de Recherches et d’Etudes des Chefs d’Entreprises, Gaston Berger définissait l’action véritable comme une série de mouvements tendant à une fin; elle n’est pas, disait-il, l’agitation par laquelle on cherche à faire croire aux autres qu’on est puissant et efficace [21]. Comme l’avait bien observé l’ancien directeur général de l’Enseignement supérieur français [22], ces finalités sont d’abord celles du changement et des processus de transformation étudiés en psychologie sociale. Ces théories ont été décrites par le chercheur américain d’origine allemande Kurt Lewin (1890-1947) [23]. Celui-ci a développé la science expérimentale de la dynamique des groupes, avant de s’intéresser au changement social. Lewin a travaillé sur la notion d’équilibre des forces égales et opposées permettant d’atteindre un état quasi stationnaire. La recherche d’un nouvel équilibre se fait après modification des forces pour provoquer un changement vers cet objectif. Trois périodes marquent ce processus : d’abord, une période de décristallisation pendant laquelle le système remet en question ses perceptions, habitudes et comportements. Les acteurs se motivent. Ensuite, une période de transition, pendant laquelle les comportements et attitudes deviennent instables et contradictoires. Les acteurs en expérimentent puis en adoptent certains. Enfin, une période de recristalisation pendant laquelle le système généralise les comportements pilotes adaptés à la nouvelle situation et harmonise les nouvelles pratiques.

PhD2050_Lewin_2013-12-31Comme le décrivent Didier Anzieu et Jacques-Yves Martin : comment surmonter la résistance initiale qui tend à ramener l’équilibre au niveau supérieur ? En « décristallisant » peu à peu les habitudes par des méthodes de discussion non directives, jusqu’au point de rupture, de choc, où une recristallisation différente peut s’opérer. Autrement dit, abaisser le seuil de résistance et amener le groupe à un degré de crise qui produit une mutation des attitudes chez ses membres, puis, par influence, dans les zones voisines du corps social [24].

Berger le rappelle : les Américains Lippitt, Watson et Westley [25] ont poursuivi cette réflexion. Ainsi, ont-ils découpé ce processus en sept phases qui s’articulent assez bien avec les étapes d’un processus prospectif : 1. développement d’un désir de changement, 2. création d’un cadre de relations orienté changement, 3. établissement du diagnostic des enjeux du système, 4 examen des chemins alternatifs et choix du plan d’action, 5. transformation des intentions en efforts de changement, 6. généralisation et stabilisation du changement, 7. détermination des relations finales avec les agents de changement. D’autres modèles existent, largement utilisés par les prospectivistes qui puisent dans la psychologie sociale et la sociologie comportementale pour mieux comprendre les processus de transformation qu’ils observent et les optimaliser lorsqu’ils veulent les mettre en œuvre eux-mêmes [26].

Conclusion : volonté et leadership

Les plans stratégiques ne se mettent pas en œuvre d’eux-mêmes, rappelle souvent le professeur Peter Bishop de l’Université de Houston. Ce sont des gens qui les mettent en œuvre. Et ces gens s’appellent des leaders [27].

Dans un débat récent portant sur le décret dit paysage, tenu au Salon du Livre politique le 10 novembre 2013 à Liège, Jean-Claude Marcourt, vice-président du gouvernement de Wallonie, en charge de l’Économie, des Technologies nouvelles et de l’Enseignement supérieur, estimait que l’on peut être progressiste sur le plan des idées et conservateur quand on vous propose le principe du changement. Hors de toute considération sur la droite, la gauche ou le centre, cette formule est particulièrement heureuse. Dans le landerneau politique comme dans le monde de l’entreprise ou des organisations, la capacité stratégique ne peut exister sans réelle volonté de transformation. Celle-ci peut et doit être portée par un leadership qui, de nos jours, ne peut être que collectif pour être puissant, même si, de l’anticipation à l’action, il s’organise sous la houlette de femmes ou d’hommes dont on reconnaît les capacités effectives à impulser et catalyser ce changement.

Ce qui rapproche la ou le responsable d’un gouvernement et celle ou celui d’une entreprise, c’est le même défi à activer les parties prenantes pour favoriser l’anticipation et faire en sorte que, s’appropriant les enjeux et la stratégie, elles passent à l’action.

Philippe Destatte

https://twitter.com/PhD2050


[1] Michel GODET, From anticipation to action, A handbook of strategic prospective, coll. Futures-oriented Studies, Paris, Unesco Publishing, 1994. – En 1991 était parue chez Dunod la version française de ce livre : De l’anticipation à l’action, Manuel de prospective et de stratégie.

[2] M.GODET, Manuel de prospective stratégique, 2 tomes, Paris, Dunod, 3e éd., 2007.

[3] Gaston BERGER, Le temps (1959) dans Phénoménologie et prospective, p. 198, Paris, PUF, 1964. Jules CHAIX-RUY, Les dimensions de l’être et du temps, Paris-Lyon, Vitte, 1953.

[4] Selon Michel Godet, aux Assises de la prospective, organisées par Futuribles à Paris Dauphine, les 8 et 9 décembre 1999.-  M. GODET, La boîte à outils de la prospective stratégique, Problèmes et méthodes, coll. Cahier du Lips, p. 14, Paris, CNAM, 5e éd., 2001.

[5] Cité par Eric JANTSCH, La prévision technologique : cadre, techniques et organisation, p. 16, Paris, OCDE, 1967.

[6] « The possibility of acting upon present reality by starting from an imagined or anticipated future situation affords great freedom to the decision maker while at the same time providing him with better controls with which to guide events. Thus, planning becomes in the true sense « future-creative » and the very fact of anticipating becomes causative of action. (p. 89 & 139)  » Hasan OZBEKHAN, The Triumph of Technology: « can implies ought », in Joseph P. MARTINO, An Introduction to Technological Forecasting, p. 83-92, New York, Gordon & Breach Science publishers, 1972. – Eleonora BARBIERI MASINI, Why Futures Studies?, p. 56, London, Grey Seal, 1993. – Erich JANTSCH, Technological Planning and Social Futures, p. 17 & 37, London, Associated Business Programmes, 2nd éd., 1974. Anticipations are « intellectively constructed models of possible futures ».

[7] Robert ROSEN, Anticipatory Systems, Philosophical, Mathematical and Methodological Foundations, Oxford, Pergamon Press, 1985. – R. ROSEN, Essays on Life itself, New York, Columbia University Press, 2000.

[8] John W. BENNETT, Human Ecology as Human Behavior: Essays in Environmental and Development Anthropology, New Brunswick, NJ, Transaction Publishers, 1993.

[9] Riel MILLER, Roberto POLI & Pierre ROSSEL, The Discipline of Anticipation: Exploring Key Issues, Unesco Working Paper nr. 1, Paris, May 2013. http://www.academia.edu/3523348/The_Discipline_of_Anticipation_Miller_Poli_Rossel_-_DRAFT

[10] Domenico ROSSETTI di VALDALBERO & Parla SROUR-GANDON, European Forward Looking Activities, EU Research in Foresight and Forecast, Socio-Economic Sciences & Humanities, List of Activities, Brussels, European Commission, DGR, Directorate L, Science, Economy & Society, 2010. http://ec.europa.eu/research/social-sciences/forward-looking_en.htmlEuropean forward-looking activities, Building the future of « Innovation Union » and ERA, Brussels, European Commission, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation, 2011. ftp://ftp.cordis.europa.eu/pub/fp7/ssh/docs/european-forward-looking-activities_en.pdf

[11] Alexander TÜBKE, Ken DUCATEL, James P. GAVIGAN, Pietro MONCADA-PATERNO-CASTELLO éd., Strategic Policy Intelligence: Current Trends, the State of the Play and perspectives, S&T Intelligence for Policy-Making Processes, IPTS, Seville, Dec. 2001.

[12] Michel CROZIER, La crise de l’intelligence, Essai sur l’impuissance des élites à se réformer, p. 19, Paris, InterEditions, 1995.

[13] A.O. HIRSCHMAN, Exit, Voice and Loyalty, Paris, Editions ouvrières, 1973.

[14] Philippe BERNOUX, Sociologie du changement dans les entreprises et les organisations, p. 10-11, Paris, Seuil, 2010.

[15] Ph. BERNOUX, Sociologie du changement..., p. 191.

[16] Ibidem, p. 11, 85 et 308.

[17] Ibidem, p. 11 et 13.

[18] Harold J. LEAVITT, Psychologie des fonctions de direction dans l’entreprise, Paris, Editions d’Organisation, 1973. Cité par Ph. BERNOUX, op. cit., p. 15-16.

[19] Ph. BERNOUX, Sociologie du changement…, p. 144.

[20] Ibidem, p. 51.

[21] Gaston BERGER, Le chef d’entreprise, philosophe en action, 8 mars 1955, dans Prospective n°7, Gaston Berger, Un philosophe dans le monde moderne, p. 50, Paris, PUF, Avril 1961.

[22] G. BERGER, L’Encyclopédie française, t. XX : Le Monde en devenir, 1959, p. 12-14, 20, 54, , reproduit dans Phénoménologie du temps et prospective, p. 271, Paris, PuF, 1964.

[23] Kurt LEWIN, Frontiers in Group Dynamics, dans Human Relations, 1947, n° 1, p. 2-38. – K. LEWIN, Psychologie dynamique, Les relations humaines, coll. Bibliothèque scientifique internationale, p. 244sv., Paris, PuF, 1964. – Bernard BURNES, Kurt Lewin and the Planned Approach to change: A Re-appraisal, Journal of Management Studies, septembre 2004, p. 977-1002. – Voir aussi Karl E. WEICK and Robert E. QUINN, Organizational Change and Development, Annual Review of Psychology, 1999, p. 361-386.

[24] Didier ANZIEU et Jacques-Yves MARTIN, La dynamique des groupes restreints, p. 86, Paris, PuF, 2007.

[25] Ronald LIPPITT, Jeanne WATSON & Bruce WESTLEY, The Dynamics of Planned Change, A Comparative Study of Principles and Techniques, New York, Harcourt, Brace & Cie, 1958.

[26] Chris ARGYRIS & Donald A. SCHON, Organizational Learning, A Theory of Action Perspective, Reading, Mass. Addison Wesley, 1978. – Gregory BATESON, Steps to an Ecology of Mind: Collected Essays in Antropology, Psychiatry, Evolution and Epistemology, University of Chicago Press, 1972. – Notamment La double contrainte (1969), dans G. BATESON, Vers une écologie de l’esprit, Paris, Seuil, 1980. – Jean-Philippe BOOTZ, Prospective et apprentissage organisationnel, coll. Travaux et recherches de prospective, Paris, Futuribles international, LIPSOR, Datar, Commissariat général du Plan, 2001. – Richard A. SLAUGHTER, The Transformative Cycle : a Tool for Illuminating Change, in Richard A. SLAUGHTER, Luke NAISMITH and Neil HOUGHTON, The Transformative Cycle, p. 5-19, Australian Foresight Institute, Swinburne University, 2004.

[27] Peter C. BISHOP and Andy HINES, Teaching about the Future, p. 225, New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.


Brussels, May 30, 2013

At the beginning of the 2000s, a semantic and methodological consensus was established at various levels, built upon the framework of the intellectually creative convergence between the Latin or French prospective and the Anglo-Saxon foresight, especially the initiatives taken by the K2 Unit of the Research Directorate-General of the European Commission under the impetus of Paraskevas Caracostas, Günter Clar, Elie Faroult and Christian Svanfeldt in particular [1]. A formal definition emerged from this, of the sort that we hope for, because our rationality wants it, but that we also fear, because our freedom may suffer from it. This formalisation, fostered by the work of Futuribles (Paris), LIPSOR (CNAM, Paris), PREST (Manchester) and The Destree Institute (Namur, Wallonia), has been successively adopted by the Wallonia Evaluation and Foresight Society, the Mutual Learning Platform of the European Commission and the European Foresight College, originating in and supported by the DATAR in the second half of the years 2000. It is, roughly speaking, this definition that appears in the Regional Foresight Glossary that constitutes the outcome of the work of this College:

Foresight is an independent, dialectical and rigorous process conducted in a cross-disciplinary and collective way and intended to shed light on questions of the present and the future, on the one hand by considering them in their holistic, systemic and complex setting and on the other hand by relating them, over and above their historicity, to temporality.

This is supplemented by two paragraphs, placed in the comments in the glossary, which elucidate the field:

Exploratory foresight allows evolving trends and counter-trends to be detected, continuities, discontinuities and bifurcations of the environmental variables (actors and factors) to be identified, and the spectrum of possible futures to be determined.

Normative foresight allows visions of desirable futures to be constructed, possible collective strategies and rationales for action to be developed and, consequently, the quality of the necessary decisions to be improved [2].

A rich but unsatisfactory definition

On the one hand this is a rich definition, as it emphasises a process that frees itself from powers and doctrines to involve a perspective of free thought, exchanges with others, open deliberation, and teamwork, all while affirming the requirements of methodological rigour, a cross-disciplinary approach and collective intelligence, usually so difficult to achieve. Modern foresight incorporates these systemic and complex reflections which, from Teilhard de Chardin [3] to Edgar Morin [4], including Jacques Lesourne [5], Joël de Rosnay [6], Pierre Gonod [7] and Thierry Gaudin [8], have modelled or reinvigorated foresight. The author of La Méthode (Method) states the essence when he stresses that the interaction of the variables in a complex system is such that it is impossible for the human mind to conceive of them analytically or to attempt to proceed by isolation of these variables if one wants to understand an entire complex system, or even a sub-system [9].

On the other hand, this definition of foresight now appears unsatisfactory to me and has a manifest weakness insofar as it does not clearly indicate that foresight is resolutely oriented toward action. It must also be noted that it should be oriented toward an aim: action for action’s sake, noted Gaston Berger, the leap into the absurd that leads to anything whatsoever, is not genuine action either. This is a series of movements tending toward an end; it is not the agitation by which one seeks to make others believe that one is powerful and efficient [10].

The action that results from foresight aims for change, that is, transformation of a part or all of a system. Peter Bishop and Andy Hines were not mistaken: the first words of the reference work of these professors of Strategic Foresight at the University of Houston are: Foresight is fundamentally about the study of change [11]. This change, as has been known since the work of Gregory Bateson [12], can only be the result of a collective, motivational process. Far from just thinking that one could modify the future simply by looking at it, Gaston Berger saw change as a dynamic that is hard to implement and difficult to conduct, as the American researchers in social psychology whose models inspired him had shown [13]. The theories of change and transformation processes described by Kurt Lewin[14], one of the most important figures in 20th century psychology, or of Lippitt, Watson and Westley[15], up to those of Edgar Morin [16] or Richard Slaughter cited below, all show the difficulty of changing the balances of power, of breaking through inertia and putting the system in motion.

The profundity of the changes to be realized must also be distinguished. Making use of the work of Chris Argyris and Donald A. Schön [17], Jean-Philippe Bootz has shown that foresight operates according to double-loop models of organisational learning, meaning that its mission is to convey innovative strategies, to make structural, intentional and non-routine changes [18]. The work of Australian foresight experts Richard Slaughter and Luke Naismith, used by the Regional Foresight College of Wallonia for the past ten years, has in fact shown the difference between a simple change as a variation in a given situation, repetitive and cyclic by nature, while a transformation consists of an essential alteration. Transformation assumes the need for a fundamental transition to another level of thought and action, a change in awareness [19]. Thus, to constitute a transformation, change must be systemic, of a magnitude that affects all the aspects of institutional functioning, rather than a simple change that affects only a part of it.

Observational foresight or transformational foresight?

In the tripod that supports foresight – long term, systemic approach to complexity, and change process – the first two features are in fact means, while the last involves ultimate aims.

Foresight for transformation is substituted for observational foresight, involving cosmetic regulation. However, this cannot be taken for granted. As Crozier and Friedberg indicate, even in the most humble context, the decisive factor in behaviour is the play of forces and influence in which the individual participates, and through which he affirms his social existence despite the constraints. But all change is dangerous, as it inevitably brings into question the terms of his operation, his sources of power and his freedom of action by modifying or eliminating the relevant areas of uncertainty that he controls [20]. One understands better why foresight frightens all those who want to see the system of former values, attitudes, behaviours and powers perpetuated. And if, by chance, they feel obliged to become involved, they will constantly attempt to control it. Of course, the insurmountable task, of this indiscipline, as Michel Godet indicates, can only be practised in a context of freedom [21]. Moreover, and this is the cornerstone of the classic L’Acteur et le système (The Actor and the System), which should never leave the bedside table of the corporate manager and the political decision maker: successful change cannot be the consequence of replacement of a former model by a new model that has been designed in advance by sages of some sort; it is the result of a collective process through which are mobilised, or even created, the resources and capacities of the participants necessary for developing new methods, free not constrained implementation of which will allow the system to orient or reorient itself as a human ensemble and not like a machine[22]. Indeed, we have experienced this in Wallonia several times…[23]

A definition of foresight that better takes these considerations into account could be written as follows. Foresight is an independent, dialectical and rigorous process, conducted in a cross-disciplinary way and based on the long term. It can elucidate questions of the present and of the future, on the one hand by considering them in their holistic, systemic and complex setting and, on the other hand, by relating them, over and above historicity, to temporality. Resolutely oriented toward projects and action, foresight aims at bringing about one or more transformations in the system that it comprehends by mobilising collective intelligence.

As for the distinction between normative and exploratory foresight, even if it seems enlightening as to the method that will be used – one explores possible futures before considering long-term issues, constructing a vision of the desirable future and building the pathways to resolve the issues and achieve the vision – it can lead to believe that one can confine oneself to one without stimulating the other. Exploratory foresight consequently becomes confused with a sort of forecast that keeps its distance from the system to be stimulated. Epistemologically attractive perhaps, but contrary to the ambition of foresight…

Certainly, much remains to be said beyond this definition, which is only just one among those that are possible. Openness to discussion is fruitful. Foresight is also a part of governance, which is now its particular field, of businesses, organisations or regions. It is probably the preferred method for approaching sustainable development, which by its nature calls for change, and for managing in this so-called transition period [24]. Moreover, this constitutes one of the phases of the change process incorporated into the model of Kurt Lewin, already cited… These considerations may seem abstract. But didn’t the German-American psychologist say that there is nothing so practical as a good theory? [25]

Philippe Destatte

https://twitter.com/PhD2050


[1] See for example and among many other productions: A Practical Guide to Regional Foresight, FOREN Network, December 2001.

[2] Philippe DESTATTE et Philippe DURANCE dir., Les mots-clefs de la prospective territoriale, p. 43, coll. Travaux, Paris, La Documentation française – DATAR, 2009.

[3] Pierre TEILHARD de CHARDIN, Écrits du temps de la Guerre, 1916-1919, Paris, Seuil, 1976. – André DANZIN et Jacques MASUREL, Teilhard de Chardin, visionnaire du monde nouveau, Paris, Editions du Rocher, 2005.

[4] Edgar MORIN, Introduction à la pensée complexe, Paris, Seuil, 2005.

[5] Jacques LESOURNE, Les systèmes du destin, Paris, Dalloz, 1976.

[6] Joël DE ROSNAY, Le macroscope, Vers une vision globale, Paris, Seuil, 1975.

[7] Pierre GONOD, Dynamique des systèmes et méthodes prospectives, coll. Travaux et recherches de foresight, Paris, Futuribles international – LIPS – DATAR, Mars 1996.

[8] Thierry GAUDIN, Discours de la méthode créatrice, Entretiens avec François L’Yvonnet, Gordes, Ose savoir-Le Relié, 2003.

[9] Edgar MORIN, Sociologie, p. 191, Paris, Fayard, 1994.

[10] Gaston BERGER, Le chef d’entreprise, philosophe en action, Conference done on the 8th March 1955, in Prospective 7, PuF-Centre d’Études prospectives, Avril 1961, p. 50.

[11] Peter BISHOP & Andy HINES, Teaching about the Future, p. 1, New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.

[12] Gregory BATESON, Steps to an Ecology of Mind: Collected Essays in Antropology, Psychiatry, Evolution and Epistemology, University of Chicago Press, 1972.

[13] Gaston BERGER, L’Encyclopédie française, t. XX : Le Monde en devenir, 1959, p. 12-14, 20, 54, in Phénoménologie du temps et prospective, p. 271, Paris, PuF, 1964.

[14] Kurt LEWIN, Frontiers in Group Dynamics, dans Human Relations, 1947, n° 1, p. 2-38. – Bernard BURNES, Kurt Lewin and the Planned Approach to change: A Re-appraisal, Journal of Management Studies, septembre 2004, p. 977-1002. – See also Karl E. WEICK and Robert E. QUINN, Organizational Change and Development, Annual Review of Psychology, 1999, p. 361-386.

[15] Ronald LIPPITT, Jeanne WATSON & Bruce WESTLEY, The Dynamics of Planned Change, A Comparative Study of Principles and Techniques, New York, Harcourt, Brace & Cie, 1958.

[16] Edgar MORIN, La méthode, 1. La Nature de la Nature, p. 158sv., Paris, Seuil, 1977.

[17] Chris ARGYRIS & Donald A. SCHON, Organizational Learning, A Theory of Action Perspective, Reading, Mass., Addison Wesley, 1978.

[18] Jean-Philippe BOOTZ, Prospective et apprentissage organisationnel, coll. Travaux et recherches de prospective, Paris, Futuribles international, LIPSOR, Datar, Commissariat général du Plan, 2001.

[19] Richard A. SLAUGHTER, The Transformative Cycle : a Tool for Illuminating Change, in Richard A. SLAUGHTER, Luke NAISMITH and Neil HOUGHTON, The Transformative Cycle, p. 5-19, Australian Foresight Institute, Swinburne University, 2004.

[20] Michel CROZIER & Erhard FRIEDBERG, L’acteur et le système, p. 386, Paris, Le Seuil, 1977.

[21] Pierre SEIN, Prospective, Réfléchir librement et ensemble, dans Sud-Ouest basque, 10 juin 1992, p. 1. – Voir aussi Michel GODET, Prospective et dynamique des territoires, dans Futuribles, Novembre 2001, p. 25-34.

[22] M. CROZIER et E. FRIEDBERG, L’acteur et le système…, p. 391.

[23] Philippe DESTATTE, Les questions ouvertes de la prospective wallonne ou quand la société civile appelle le changement, dans Territoires 2020, Revue d’études et de prospective de la DATAR, n° 3, Juin 2001, p. 139-153.

[24] Philippe DESTATTE, Une transition…. mais vers quoi ? Blog PhD2050, 12 mai 2013, http://phd2050.org/2013/05/12/une-transition/

[25] Kurt LEWIN, Problems of research in social psychology in D. CARTWRIGHT, ed., Field Theory in Social Science, London, Social Science Paperbacks, 1943-1944.

Namur, le 10 avril 2013

Au début des années 2000, un consensus sémantique et méthodologique s’est fondé à différents niveaux, se construisant dans le cadre de la convergence intellectuellement créative entre la prospective latine ou française et le foresight anglo-saxon, particulièrement les initiatives prises par l’Unité K2 de la DG Recherche de la Commission européenne sous l’impulsion notamment de Paraskevas Caracostas, Günter Clar, Elie Faroult et Christian Svanfeldt [1]. Une définition formelle en a émergé : de la nature de celle qu’on espère parce que notre rationalité les désire mais qu’on craint également, parce que notre liberté risque d’en souffrir. Cette formalisation, nourrie des travaux de Futuribles (Paris), du LIPSOR (CNAM, Paris) et de PREST (Manchester), a été successivement adoptée par la Société wallonne de l’Évaluation et de la Prospective de Wallonie, la Mutual Learning Platform de la Commission européenne et par le Collège européen de Prospective, né au sein de et soutenu par la DATAR dans la deuxième partie des années 2000. C’est grosso modo cette définition qui figure dans le Glossaire de la Prospective territoriale qui constitue le fruit des travaux de ce Collège :

La prospective est une démarche indépendante, dialectique et rigoureuse, menée de manière transdisciplinaire et collective et destinée à éclairer les questions du présent et de l’avenir, d’une part en les considérant dans leur cadre holistique, systémique et complexe et, d’autre part, en les inscrivant, au delà de l’historicité, dans la temporalité.

Elle se complète par deux paragraphes, placés en commentaires dans le glossaire, qui éclairent la discipline :

Exploratoire, la prospective permet de déceler les tendances et contre-tendances d’évolution, d’identifier les continuités, les ruptures et les bifurcations des variables de l’environnement (acteurs et facteurs), ainsi que de déterminer l’éventail des futurs possibles.

Normative, la prospective permet de construire des visions de futurs souhaitables, d’élaborer des stratégies collectives et des logiques d’intervention possibles et, dès lors, d’améliorer la qualité des décisions à prendre [2].

Une définition riche mais insatisfaisante

D’une part, il s’agit d’une définition riche parce qu’elle insiste sur le positionnement d’une démarche qui s’affranchit des pouvoirs et doctrines pour s’inscrire dans une logique de pensée libre, d’échanges avec autrui et de délibération ouverte, de travail en équipe, tout en affirmant ces exigences que sont la rigueur méthodologique, la transdisciplinarité et l’intelligence collective, si difficiles à réaliser. La prospective moderne intègre ces pensées systémiques et complexes qui, de Teilhard de Chardin [3] à Edgar Morin [4], en passant par Jacques Lesourne [5], Joël de Rosnay [6], Pierre Gonod [7]  et Thierry Gaudin [8], ont modelé ou renouvelé la prospective. L’essentiel est dit par l’auteur de La Méthode, lorsqu’il souligne que l’interaction des variables dans un système complexe est tel qu’il est impossible à l’esprit humain de les concevoir analytiquement ou de tenter de procéder par isolement de ces variables si l’on veut concevoir l’ensemble d’un système ou même d’un sous-système complexe [9] .

D’autre part, cette définition de la prospective m’apparaît aujourd’hui insatisfaisante et porteuse d’une faiblesse manifeste dans la mesure où elle n’indique pas clairement que la prospective est résolument tournée vers l’action. Encore faut-il noter que celle-ci doit être orientée vers un but : l’action pour l’action, notait Gaston Berger, le saut dans l’absurde qui conduit à n’importe quoi n’est pas non plus une action véritable. Celle-ci est une série de mouvements tendant à une fin ; elle n’est pas l’agitation par laquelle on cherche à faire croire aux autres qu’on est puissant et efficace [10].

L’action qui résulte de la prospective a pour finalité le changement, c’est-à-dire la transformation d’une partie ou de la totalité d’un système [11].  Peter Bishop et Andy Hines ne s’y trompent pas : les premiers mots de l’ouvrage de référence de ces professeurs de Strategic Foresight à l’Université de Houston sont : Foresight is fundamently about the study of change [12]. Ce changement, on le sait depuis les travaux de Gregory Bateson [13], ne peut être que le résultat d’un processus collectif, mobilisateur. Loin de n’être que celui qui pensait que, simplement en regardant le futur, on pouvait le modifier, Gaston Berger voyait le changement comme une dynamique lourde à mettre en œuvre et difficile à mener, ainsi que l’avaient montré les chercheurs américains de la psychologie sociale dont les modèles l’inspiraient [14]. Les théories du changement et les processus de transformation décrits par Kurt Lewin [15] – une des figures les plus importantes de la psychologie du XXème siècle –, ou encore de Lippitt, Watson et Westley [16], jusqu’à ceux d’Edgar Morin [17] ou de Richard Slaughter – évoqué ci-après –, montrent tous la difficulté du changement des rapports de force, de la rupture de l’inertie et de la mise en mouvement du système.

Encore faut-il distinguer la profondeur des changements opérés. C’est en s’appuyant sur les travaux de Chris Argyris et de Donald A. Schön [18] que Jean-Philippe Bootz a montré que la prospective opérait selon des modèles d’apprentissage organisationnel en double boucle, c’est-à-dire que sa vocation était de porter des stratégies de rupture, d’opérer des changements structurels, intentionnels et non-routiniers [19]. Les travaux des prospectivistes australiens Richard Slaughter et Luke Naismith, utilisés par le Collège régional de Prospective de Wallonie depuis dix ans déjà, ont bien montré la différence entre un simple changement comme variation d’une situation donnée, répétitive et cyclique par nature tandis qu’une transformation consiste en une altération essentielle. La transformation assume le besoin d’un passage fondamental à un autre niveau de pensée et d’action, un changement dans la conscience [20]. Ainsi, pour constituer une transformation, le changement doit-il être systémique, d’une magnétude qui affecte tous les aspects du fonctionnement institutionnel, davantage qu’un simple changement qui n’en toucherait qu’une partie.

Une prospective du regard ou une prospective de la transformation ?

Dans le trépied qui soutient la prospective – long terme, approche systémique de la complexité, processus de changement –, les deux premiers sont en fait des moyens tandis que le dernier relève des fins.

À une prospective du regard, porteuse de régulation cosmétique, se substitue une prospective de la transformation. Celle-ci, pourtant, ne va pas de soi. Comme l’indiquent Crozier et Friedberg, même dans le plus humble contexte, l’élément décisif du comportement, c’est le jeu du pouvoir et d’influence auquel l’individu participe et à travers lequel il affirme son existence sociale malgré les contraintes. Or tout changement est dangereux, car il met en question immanquablement les conditions de son jeu, ses sources de pouvoir et sa liberté d’action en modifiant ou en faisant disparaître les zones d’incertitude pertinentes qu’il contrôle [21]. On comprend mieux pourquoi la prospective fait peur à tous ceux qui veulent voir se perpétuer le système des valeurs, attitudes, comportements et pouvoirs anciens. Et si, d’aventure, ils se sentent obligés de s’y investir, ils n’auront de cesse de tenter de la contrôler. Tâche insurmontable, bien sûr, car cette indiscipline, comme l’indique Michel Godet, ne s’exerce que dans un cadre de liberté [22]. De surcroît, et c’est la pierre angulaire de ce classique L’Acteur et le système, qui ne devrait jamais quitter la table de chevet du chef d’entreprise et du décideur politique : le changement réussi ne peut être la conséquence du remplacement d’un modèle ancien par un modèle nouveau qui aurait été conçu à l’avance par des sages quelconques ; il est le résultat d’un processus collectif à travers lequel sont mobilisées, voire créées, les ressources et capacités des participants nécessaires pour la constitution de nouveaux jeux dont la mise en œuvre libre non contrainte permettra au système de s’orienter ou de se réorienter comme un ensemble humain et non comme une machine [23]. Nous en avons, du reste, fait plusieurs fois l’expérience en Wallonie… [24]

Une définition de la prospective qui tiendrait mieux compte de ces considérations pourrait s’écrire comme suit. La prospective est une démarche indépendante, dialectique et rigoureuse, menée de manière transdisciplinaire en s’appuyant sur la longue durée. Elle peut éclairer les questions du présent et de l’avenir, d’une part en les considérant dans leur cadre holistique, systémique et complexe et, d’autre part, en les inscrivant, au delà de l’historicité, dans la temporalité. Résolument tournée vers le projet et vers l’action, la prospective a vocation à provoquer une ou plusieurs transformation(s) au sein du système qu’elle appréhende en mobilisant l’intelligence collective.

Quant à la distinction entre prospective normative et exploratoire, même si elle paraît éclairante sur la méthode qui sera utilisée – on explore les avenirs possibles avant de s’interroger sur les enjeux de long terme, de construire une vision du futur souhaitable et de construire les chemins pour répondre aux enjeux et atteindre la vision –, elle peut laisser penser que l’on pourrait s’en tenir à l’une sans activer l’autre. La prospective exploratoire se confondrait dès lors avec une sorte de prévision qui se maintiendrait à distance du système à activer. Epistémologiquement séduisant peut-être, mais contraire à l’ambition de la  prospective…

Certes, beaucoup reste à dire au delà de cette définition qui n’est jamais qu’une parmi celles qui sont possibles. La mise en débat ne peut être que fructueuse. On pourrait ajouter que la prospective s’inscrit dans la gouvernance qui est désormais son terrain de prédilection, pour les entreprises, les organisations ou les territoires. On devrait peut-être également signaler qu’elle est probablement la méthode de prédilection pour aborder le développement durable qui, par nature, appelle le changement, et pour piloter en cette période dite de transition [25]. Celle-ci, constitue d’ailleurs une des phases du processus de changement intégré au cœur du modèle de Kurt Lewin, déjà évoqué… Ces considérations peuvent, du reste, nous paraître abstraites. Mais le psychologue germano-américain ne répétait-il pas qu’il n’y avait rien de si pratique qu’une bonne théorie ? [26]

Philippe Destatte

https://twitter.com/PhD2050

 

 


[1] Voir par exemple, et parmi beaucoup d’autres productions : A Practical Guide to Regional Foresight, FOREN Network, December 2001.

[2] Philippe DESTATTE et Philippe DURANCE dir., Les mots-clefs de la prospective territoriale, p. 43, coll. Travaux, Paris, La Documentation française – DATAR, 2009.

[3] Pierre TEILHARD de CHARDIN, Écrits du temps de la Guerre,1916-1919, Paris, Seuil, 1976. – André DANZIN et Jacques MASUREL, Teilhard de Chardin, visionnaire du monde nouveau, Paris, Editions du Rocher, 2005.

[4] Edgar MORIN, Introduction à la pensée complexe, Paris, Seuil, 2005.

[5] Jacques LESOURNE, Les systèmes du destin, Paris, Dalloz, 1976.

[6] Joël DE ROSNAY, Le macroscope, Vers une vision globale, Paris, Seuil, 1975.

[7] Pierre GONOD, Dynamique des systèmes et méthodes prospectives, coll. Travaux et recherches de prospective, Paris, Futuribles international – LIPS – DATAR, Mars 1996.

[8] Thierry GAUDIN, Discours de la méthode créatrice, Entretiens avec François L’Yvonnet, Gordes, Ose savoir-Le Relié, 2003.

[9] Edgar MORIN, Sociologie, p. 191, Paris, Fayard, 1994.

[10] Gaston BERGER, Le chef d’entreprise, philosophe en action, Extraits d’une conférence faite à la Section d’Études générales du Centre de Recherches et d’Études des Chefs d’Entreprises, le 8 mars 1955, dans Prospective 7, PuF-Centre d’Études prospectives, Avril 1961, p. 50.

[11] S’il nous fallait écrire une définition du changement, elle serait proche de celle que Guy Rocher applique au changement social : toute transformation observable dans le temps, qui affecte, d’une manière qui ne soit pas que provisoire ou éphémère, la structure et le fonctionnement de l’organisation sociale d’une collectivité donnée et modifie le cours de son histoire. Guy ROCHER, Introduction à la sociologie générale, 3. Le changement social, p. 22, Paris, Editions HMH, 1968.

[12] Peter BISHOP & Andy HINES, Teaching about the Future, p. 1, New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.

[13] Gregory BATESON, Steps to an Ecology of Mind: Collected Essays in Antropology, Psychiatry, Evolution and Epistemology, University of Chicago Press, 1972. – Notamment La double contrainte (1969), dans G. BATESON, Vers une écologie de l’esprit, Paris, Seuil, 1980.

[14] Gaston BERGER, L’Encyclopédie française, t. XX : Le Monde en devenir, 1959, p. 12-14, 20, 54, , reproduit dans Phénoménologie du temps et prospective, p. 271, Paris, PuF, 1964.

[15] Kurt LEWIN, Frontiers in Group Dynamics, dans Human Relations, 1947, n° 1, p. 2-38. – K. LEWIN, Psychologie dynamique, Les relations humaines, coll. Bibliothèque scientifique internationale, p. 244sv., Paris, PuF, 1964. – Bernard BURNES, Kurt Lewin and the Planned Approach to change: A Re-appraisal, Journal of Management Studies, septembre 2004, p. 977-1002. – Voir aussi Karl E. WEICK and Robert E. QUINN, Organizational Change and Development, Annual Review of Psychology, 1999, p. 361-386.

[16] Ronald LIPPITT, Jeanne WATSON & Bruce WESTLEY, The Dynamics of Planned Change, A Comparative Study of Principles and Techniques, New York, Harcourt, Brace & Cie, 1958.

[17] Edgar MORIN, La méthode, 1. La Nature de la Nature, p. 158sv., Paris, Seuil, 1977.

[18] Chris ARGYRIS & Donald A. SCHON, Organizational Learning, A Theory of Action Perspective, Reading, Mass., Addison Wesley, 1978.

[19] Jean-Philippe BOOTZ, Prospective et apprentissage organisationnel, coll. Travaux et recherches de prospective, Paris, Futuribles international, LIPSOR, Datar, Commissariat général du Plan, 2001.

[20] Richard A. SLAUGHTER, The Transformative Cycle : a Tool for Illuminating Change, in Richard A. SLAUGHTER, Luke NAISMITH and Neil HOUGHTON, The Transformative Cycle, p. 5-19, Australian Foresight Institute, Swinburne University, 2004.

[21] Michel CROZIER & Erhard FRIEDBERG, L’acteur et le système, p. 386, Paris, Le Seuil, 1977.

[22] Pierre SEIN, Prospective, Réfléchir librement et ensemble, dans Sud-Ouest basque, 10 juin 1992, p. 1. – Voir aussi Michel GODET, Prospective et dynamique des territoires, dans Futuribles, Novembre 2001, p. 25-34.

[23] M. CROZIER et E. FRIEDBERG, L’acteur et le système…, p. 391.

[24] Philippe DESTATTE, Les questions ouvertes de la prospective wallonne ou quand la société civile appelle le changement, dans Territoires 2020, Revue d’études et de prospective de la DATAR, n° 3, Juin 2001, p. 139-153.

[25] Denis STOKKINK dir., La transition : un enjeu économique et social pour la Wallonie, Bruxelles, Pour la Solidarité, Mars 2013.

[26] « There is nothing so practical as a good theory », Kurt LEWIN, Problems of research in social psychology in D. CARTWRIGHT, éd., Field Theory in Social Science, London, Social Science Paperbacks, 1943-1944.