archive

Archives de Tag: Max Weber

Reims, 7 November 2017

 

An innovative, global movement

In 2008, in his Change we can believe in project, Barack Obama highlighted the need to establish greater transparency in political institutions so that all citizens have access to information they need to evaluate the performance of the leaders. The candidate wrote that finally the governance of the country must be a source of inspiration for all Americans and must encourage them to act as citizens [1]. In addition to his desire to reduce unnecessary public expenditure, cut bureaucracy and cancel ineffective programmes, the future President of the United States announced that he wanted to open up democracy. The new Obama administration, he announced, will publish on line all information on the management of the State and will employ all available technologies to raise public awareness of State expenditure. It will invite members of the public to serve and take part, and it will reduce bureaucracy to ensure that all government agencies operate with maximum efficiency [2]. In addition to these priorities he announced compliance with the obligations on natural resources and on social inclusion and cohesion. The stated objective was to restore confidence in the institutions and to clean up Washington: imposing a strict ethical code on the elected representatives and limiting the influence of the lobbies and interest groups [3].

When President Obama entered the White House, one of his first initiatives, on 21 January 2009, was to send a memorandum on transparency and Open Government to the officials at the government ministries and agencies. In this document, the new president reaffirmed his pledge to create a government of this type and asked his departments to help create a political system founded on transparency, public participation and collaboration. This openness, he wrote, would strengthen democracy and promote the effectiveness and efficiency of the government. Firstly, the president wanted the government to be transparent and to promote accountability [4] and tell the public what it was doing. Next, the government should be participatory: when knowledge is shared between the public and private spheres, it is in the common interest for the public to participate in developing policies and allow their government to benefit from their collective intelligence. Finally, the government should be collaborative, which means that it should actively engage Americans in the work of their government, harnessing innovative tools and methods to ensure that all levels of the government and the administration cooperate with each other and with the non-profit organisations, businesses and individuals in the private sector [5]. After being gradually implemented in the United States, this movement, which follows an already long-standing Anglo-Saxon tradition [6], has inspired other countries and prompted an important multilateral initiative which, incidentally, The Destree Institute joined as a civil society partner in 2017.

Thus, in 2011, the Open Government Partnership (OGP) was launched by the governments of the United States, Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Norway, the Philippines, South Africa and the United Kingdom, who adopted a joint declaration [7]. The objective of the OGP is to set up a platform for good practices between innovators in order to secure concrete commitments from governments on transparency, public action, empowerment of citizens, public participation, democratic innovation and harnessing new technologies to promote better governance.

As the years have passed, more than 70 countries have joined the initiative. As of 2017, the Belgian Federal State has not yet done so [8]. France, which was a pioneer in deliberative processes and Open Data, only joined the OGP in 2014 but has held the joint presidency since 2015, becoming co-organiser of the 4th Global Summit for the Open Government Partnership, which was held in the French capital at the end of 2016. The Paris Declaration, which was adopted on 7 December 2016, reaffirms all the founding principles and values of the OGP and undertakes to push forward the frontiers of the reforms beyond transparency, to advance meaningful participation, accountability and responsiveness. The signatories to the Paris Declaration also pledge to create innovative alliances between civil society and government leading to more collaborative public services and decision-making processes. The document also calls for the development of Open Government at the local level and the launch of local participatory initiatives to bring public policies closer to citizens [9].

A citizen-centred culture of governance

To answer the question of what open government really is, we could examine the closed model of decision-making with Beth Simone Noveck, who ran the Open Government Initiative at the White House in 2009 and 2010. This legal expert and law professor, who is a Yale and Harvard graduate, considers that the closed model is the one that was created by Max Weber, Walter Lippmann and James Madison. This model would have us believe that only government professionals and their experts, who themselves claim to be strictly objective [10], possess the necessary impartiality, expertise, resources, discipline and time to make the right public decisions. This vision, which ought to be a thing of the past, restricts public participation to representative democracy, voting, joining interest groups and involvement in local civic or political activities. Yet, today, we know that, for many reasons, professional politicians do not have a monopoly on information or expertise [11].

Technological innovation and what is today called Digital Social Innovation (DSI) [12] are contributing to this change. However, we do not think they are the driving force behind the Open Government concepts as they are somewhat peripheral. Although technology does have some significance in this process, it is perhaps in relation to its toolkit rather than its challenges or purposes. Open Government forms part of a two-fold tradition. Firstly, that of transparency and free access to public information on civil society. This is not new. The British parliament endorsed it in the 1990s [13]. Secondly, Open Government finds its inspiration in the values of sharing and collaboration used within the communities linked to the free software and open science movements [14]. In this sense, public expectations could be raised, as is the case with some researchers who see in Open Government the extent to which citizens can monitor and influence government processes through access to government information and access to decision-making arenas [15].

Even if we consider that the idea of Open Government is still under construction [16], we can still try to establish a definition. Taking our inspiration from the OECD definition in English, Open Government can be conceived as a citizen-centred culture of governance that utilizes innovative and sustainable tools, policies and practices to promote government transparency, responsiveness and accountability to foster stakeholders’ participation in support of democracy and inclusive growth  [17]. The aim of this process is that it should lead to the co-construction of collective policies that involve all the parties involved in governance (public sphere, businesses, civil society, etc.) and pursue the general interest and the common good.

The international OGP organisation states that an Open Government strategy can only really develop where it is supported by an appropriate environment that allows it to be rolled out. The issue of the leadership of the political players is clearly very important, as is the capacity (empowerment) of the citizens to participate effectively in public action: this is central to the reforms it brings about, as the international organisation noted. Today, governments acknowledge the need to move from the role of simple providers of services towards the development of closer partnerships with all relevant stakeholders.[18].

Thus Open Government reconnects with one of the initial definitions of governance, as expressed by Steven Rosell in 1992: a process whereby an organisation or a society steers itself, using its players [19]. It has become commonplace to reiterate that the challenges we face today can no longer be resolved, given their magnitude, by a traditional government and several cohorts or even legions of civil servants.

Nevertheless, faced with these often enormous challenges, Professor of Business Administration Douglas Schuler rightly reflects on the capacity for action of the entire society that would have to be mobilised and poses the question: will we be smart enough soon enough? To answer this question, Schuler, who is also president of the Public Sphere Project, calls for what he refers to as civic intelligence, a form of collective intelligence centred on shared challenges, which focuses on improving society as a whole rather than just the individual. The type of democracy that is based on civic intelligence, writes Douglas Schuler, is one which, as the American psychologist and philosopher John Dewey wrote, can be seen as a way of life rather than as a duty, one in which participation in a participatory process strengthens the citizenship of individuals and allows them to think more in terms of community. To that end, deliberation is absolutely essential. It can be defined as a process of directed communication whereby people discuss their concerns in a reasonable, conscientious, and open manner, with the intent of arriving at a decision [20]. Deliberation occurs when people with dissimilar points of view exchange ideas with the intent of coming to an agreement. As futurists are well aware, the intended product of deliberation is a more coherent vision of the future [21].

Contrary to what is generally believed, true deliberation processes are rare, both in the civic sphere and in specifically political and institutional contexts. Moreover, Beth Simone Noveck describes deliberative democracy as timid, preferring the term collaborative democracy, which focuses more on results and decisions and is best promoted through technologies [22]. These processes do, however, constitute the basic methodology for more participative dynamics, such as the co-construction of public policies or collective policies, leading to contractualisation of players, additionality of financing and partnership implementation and evaluation. The distance between these simple, more or less formal consultation processes or these socio-economic discussion processes can be measured using Rhineland or Meuse models, which date back to the period just after the Second World War period and which, admittedly, are no longer adequate to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

The United Nations was right when it added a Goal 17, “Partnerships for the Goals”, to the already explicit Goal 16, which is one of the sustainable development goals focussing specifically on the emergence of peaceful and inclusive societies, access to justice for all, and building effective, accountable institutions at all levels. This Goal 17 calls for effective partnerships to be set up between governments, the private sector and civil society: these inclusive partnerships built upon principles and values, a shared vision, and shared goals that place people and the planet at the centre, are needed at the global, regional, national and local level [23].

Open regions and territories

In his speech at the Open Government Partnership Forum, which was held in parallel with the 72nd United Nations General Assembly on 19 September 2017, President Emmanuel Macron stated that local authorities have an increasing role to play and are an absolutely essential part of Open Government [24]. In his election campaign, the future French president also highlighted the fact that public policies are more effective when they are constructed with the constituents for whom they are intended. And in what he called the République contractuelle [Contractual Republic], a Republic which places trust in local districts, key players and society, the former minister saw a new idea for democracy: « these are not passive citizens who delegate the governance of the nation to their political leaders. A healthy, modern democracy is a system composed of active citizens who play their part in transforming the country » [25].

In keeping with the work already carried out since the start of the parliamentary term in the Parliament of Wallonia, the Wallonia Regional Policy Declaration of 28 July 2017 embodies this change by calling for a democratic revival and an improvement in public governance founded on the four pillars of transparency, participation, responsibility and performance. Transparency concerns the comprehensibility of the rules and regulations, the operating methods, and the mechanisms, content and financing of the decisions. The aim of participation is the involvement of citizens and private actors, businesses and the non-profit sector by giving them the initiative as a matter of priority, with the State providing support and strategic direction. The text invokes a new citizenship of cooperation, public debate, active information and involvement. The responsibility thus promoted is mainly that of the representative – elected or appointed – and sees an increase in accountability. The relations between public authorities and associations need to be clarified. The text states that performance is defined by evaluating the impact of public action in economic, budgetary, employment, environmental and social matters. It establishes a desire for a drastic simplification of public institutions rightly regarded as too numerous and too costly [26].

As we can see, these options are interesting and they undoubtedly represent a step forward inspired by the idea of Open Government we have been calling for lately [27], even if they have not yet moved on to genuine collaborative governance, deliberation with all actors and citizens or co-construction of public policies beyond experiments with public panels.

Conclusion: a government of the citizens, by the citizens, for the citizens

Open Government is a matter of democracy, not technology. This model reconnects with Abraham Lincoln’s idea of government of the people, by the people, for the people, which ended his Gettysburg address of 19 November 1863 [28]. This powerful idea can be advantageous for all of the regions in Europe, for its States and for the European process as a whole. Here, as in the United States, the principle of Open Government must be adopted by all representatives and applied at all levels of governance[29]. Parliaments and regional councils, who have often already embarked on pioneering initiatives, must grasp it [30].

As Douglas Schuler stated, Open Government would make no sense if it was not accompanied by informed, conscious and engaged citizenship, if it did not mean governance fully distributed within the population, the end of government as the sole place of governance. So this observation refers back to the initial question: what skills and information do citizens need in order to understand the issues they must face? [31] We know the response of Thomas Jefferson, writing from Paris to the philosopher Richard Price in 1789: a sense of necessity, and a submission to it, is to me a new and consolatory proof that, whenever the people are well informed, they can be trusted with their own government; that, whenever things get so far wrong as to attract their notice, they may be relied on to set them to rights [32]. This question certainly requires a response linked to lifelong critical education, the importance of philosophy and history, and the teaching of citizenship, foresight and complexity we have discussed recently [33]. As Pierre Rosanvallon notes, it is a question of making society comprehensible for the public, of ensuring that they can have effective knowledge of the social world and the mechanisms that govern it, to enable individuals to have access to what the Collège de France Professor calls real citizenship: an understanding of the effective social relationships, redistribution mechanisms and problems encountered when creating a society of equals [34].

As we have repeatedly stated, Open Government and governance by the players require an open society [35], in other words, a common space, a community of citizens where everyone works together to consider and address shared issues for the common good. Moving from Open Government to an open State happens by extension and through the application of the principles mentioned, from the executive to the legislature and the judiciary, and to all the players upstream and downstream.

Where national governments have not yet launched their open governance strategy, they should start with the districts, cities and regions, which often have the benefit of flexibility and proximity with the players and citizens. Naturally, this requirement also implies that private organisations, too, should be more transparent and more open and become more involved.

Aligning these global ambitions, which have been adopted by the United Nations and passed on by the OECD, Europe and more than 70 nations around the world, with the expectations of our regional players appears to be within reach. It is up to us to complete this task with enthusiasm and determination, wherever we are in this society that dreams of a better world.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

[1] Barack OBAMA, Change we can believe in, Three Rivers Press, 2008. Translated into French under the title Le changement, Nous pouvons y croire, p. 180, Paris, Odile Jacob, 2009.

[2] Ibidem.

[3] Ibidem, p. 181sv.

[4] Concerning accountability, which he prefers to translate by rendering of accounts, see Pierre ROSANVALLON, Le bon gouvernement, p. 269sv, Paris, Seuil, 2015.

[5] Memo from President Obama on Transparency and Open Government, January 21, 2009. Reproduced in Daniel LATHROP & Laurel RUMA ed., Open Government, Transparency, and Participation in Practice, p. 389-390, Sebastopol, CA, O’Reilly, 2010.

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=85677

[6] For the background in the United States, see: Patrice McDERMOTT, Building Open Government, in Government Information Quarterly, no. 27, 2010, p. 401-413.

[7] Joint declaration on open government, https://www.opengovpartnership.org/d-claration-commune-pour-un-gouvernement-ouvert

[8] La Belgique n’est toujours pas membre du Partenariat pour un Gouvernement ouvert, in Le Vif-L’Express, 11 August 2017.

[9] Déclaration de Paris, 4e Sommet mondial du Partenariat pour un Gouvernement ouvert, Open Government Partnership, 7 December 2016. https://www.opengovpartnership.org/paris-declaration

[10] See Philip E. TETLOCK, Expert Political Judgment, How good is it? How can we know? Princeton NJ, Princeton University Press, 2005.

[11] Beth Simone NOVECK, Wiki Government: How technology can make government better, democracy stranger, and citizens more powerful, Brookings Institution Press, 2009. – The Single point of Failure, in Daniel LATHROP & Laurel RUMA ed., Open Government, Transparency, and Participation in Practice, p. 50, Sebastopol, CA, O’Reilly, 2010. For an empirical approach to Open Governance, see Albert J. MEIJER et al., La gouvernance ouverte: relier visibilité et moyens d’expression, in Revue internationale des Sciences administratives 2012/1 (Vol. 78), p. 13-32.

[12] Matt STOKES, Peter BAECK, Toby BAKER, What next for Digital Social Innovation?, Realizing the potential of people and technology to tackle social challenges, European Commission, DSI4EU, Nesta Report, May 2017. https://www.nesta.org.uk/sites/default/files/dsi_report.pdf

[13] Freedom of access to information on the environment (1st report, Session 1996-97) https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld199697/ldselect/ldeucom/069xii/ec1233.htm

[14] Romain BADOUARD (lecturer at the Université Cergy-Pontoise), Open governement, open data: l’empowerment citoyen en question, in Clément MABI, Jean-Christophe PLANTIN and Laurence MONNOYER-SMITH dir., Ouvrir, partager, réutiliser, Regards critiques sur les données numériques, Paris, Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, 2017 http://books.openedition.org/editionsmsh/9067

[15] Albert J. MEIJER, Deirdre CURTIN & Maarten HILLEBRANDT, Open Government: Connecting vision and voice, in International Review of Administrative Sciences, 78, 10-29, p. 13.

[16] Douglas SCHULER, Online Deliberation and Civic Intelligence in D. LATHROP & L. RUMA ed., Open Government…, p. 92sv. – see also the interesting analysis by Emad A. ABU-SHANAB, Reingineering the open government concept: An empirical support for a proposed model, in Government Information Quarterly, no. 32, 2015, p. 453-463.

[17] A citizen-centred culture of governance that utilizes innovative and sustainable tools, policies and practices to promote government transparency, responsiveness and accountability to foster stakeholdersparticipation in support of democracy and inclusive growth. OECD, Open Government, The Global context and the way forward, p. 19, Paris, OECD Publishing, 2016.

[18] OECD, Panorama des administrations publiques, p. 198, Paris, OECD, 2017. – See also, p. 29 and 30 of the same work, some specific definitions developed in various countries.

[19] Steven A. ROSELL ea, Governing in an Information Society, p. 21, Montréal, 1992.

[20] Douglas SCHULER, Online Deliberation and Civic Intelligence... p. 93.

[21] Ibidem.

[22] B. S. NOVECK, op.cit., p. 62-63.

[23] Sustainable Development Goals, 17 Goals to transform our world. http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/globalpartnerships/

[24] Speech by the President of the Republic Emmanuel Macron at the Open Government Partnership event held in parallel with the 72nd United Nations General Assembly (19 September 2017) – http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x61l75r

[25] Emmanuel MACRON, Révolution, p. 255-256 and 259, Paris, XO, 2016.

[26] Parliament of Wallonia, Session 2016-2017, Déclaration de politique régionale, « La Wallonie plus forte », 28 July 2017, DOC 880(2016-2017) – No. 1, p. 3-5.

[27] Olivier MOUTON, Une thérapie de choc pour la Wallonie, in Le Vif-L’Express, no. 44, 3 November 2017, p. 35.

[28] Carl MALAMUD, By the People, in D. LATHROP & L. RUMA ed., Open Government…, p. 41.

[29] Ibidem, p. 46.

[30] David BEETHAM, Parlement et démocratie au vingt-et-unième siècle, Guide des bonnes pratiques, Geneva, Parliamentary Union, 2006.

[31] Douglas SCHULER, Online Deliberation and Civic Intelligence... p. 93.

[32] Letter To Richard Price, Paris, January 8, 1789, in Thomas JEFFERSON, Writings, p. 935, New-York, The Library of America, 1984.

[33] Ph. DESTATTE, Apprendre au XXIème siècle, Citoyenneté, complexité et prospective, Liège, 22 September 2017. https://phd2050.org/2017/10/09/apprendre/

[34] P. ROSANVALLON, Le bon gouvernement…, p. 246.

[35] Archon FUNG & David WEIL, Open Government and open society, in D. LATHROP & L. RUMA ed., Open Government…, p. 41.

Reims, le 7 novembre 2017

Une dynamique mondiale et innovatrice

Dans son projet Change we can believe in, Barack Obama avait souligné en 2008 la nécessité d’instaurer une plus grande transparence des institutions politiques de manière à ce que tous les citoyens aient accès aux informations nécessaires pour juger du bilan des dirigeants. Enfin, écrivait-il, la direction du pays doit être une source d’inspiration pour tous les Américains et doit les inciter à agir en citoyens [1]. Au delà de sa volonté de diminuer les dépenses publiques superflues, de réduire la bureaucratie et de supprimer les programmes inefficaces, le futur président des États-Unis annonçait vouloir ouvrir les portes de la démocratie. La nouvelle administration Obama, annonçait-il, mettra en ligne toutes les données concernant la gestion de l’État et emploiera toutes les technologies disponibles pour éclairer l’opinion sur les dépenses de l’État. Elle invitera les citoyens à servir et à participer, et elle réduira la paperasserie pour s’assurer que toutes les agences gouvernementales fonctionnent avec la plus grande efficacité possible [2]. Il ajoutait à ces priorités le respect des obligations sur les ressources naturelles ainsi que l’inclusion et la cohésion sociales. L’objectif annoncé était à la fois de restaurer la confiance dans les institutions, mais aussi de nettoyer Washington : contraindre les élus à une éthique stricte ainsi que limiter l’influence des lobbies et groupes d’intérêts [3].

Lors de son accession à la Maison-Blanche, une des premières initiatives du Président Obama fut, le 21 janvier 2009, d’adresser aux responsables des ministères et des agences gouvernementales un mémorandum portant sur la transparence et le Gouvernement ouvert. Dans ce texte, le nouveau président rappelait son engagement de créer un gouvernement de ce type et demandait à ses administrations de contribuer à réaliser un système politique fondé sur la transparence, la participation publique ainsi que la collaboration. Cette ouverture, écrivait-il, renforcera la démocratie et favorisera l’efficacité et l’efficience du gouvernement. D’abord, le président voulait que le gouvernement soit transparent, qu’il valorise l’imputabilité (accountability) [4] et qu’il informe les citoyens sur ce qu’il fait. Ensuite, le gouvernement devait être participatif : alors que la connaissance est partagée entre les sphères publique et privée, il est de l’intérêt commun que les citoyens participent à l’élaboration des politiques et qu’ils fassent bénéficier leur gouvernement des bénéfices de leur intelligence collective. Enfin, le gouvernement devait être collaboratif, ce qui signifie qu’il engage les Américains dans le travail de leur gouvernement, en mobilisant des outils et des méthodes innovantes pour faire coopérer tous les niveaux du gouvernement et de l’administration avec les ong, les entreprises et les particuliers dans le secteur privé [5]. Progressivement mise en œuvre aux États-Unis, cette dynamique qui s’inscrit dans une tradition anglo-saxonne déjà ancienne [6] a inspiré d’autres pays, ainsi qu’une importante initiative multilatérale à laquelle l’Institut Destrée a d’ailleurs adhéré en 2017, au titre de partenaire de la société civile.

Ainsi, le Partenariat pour le Gouvernement ouvert (PGO) a-t-il été lancé en 2011 par les gouvernements des États-Unis, du Brésil, de l’Indonésie, du Mexique, de la Norvège, des Philippines, de l’Afrique du Sud et du Royaume uni, qui ont adopté une déclaration commune [7]. L’objectif du PGO est de mettre en place une plateforme de bonnes pratiques entre innovateurs pour amener les gouvernements à des engagements concrets en matière de transparence de l’action publique, de responsabilisation des citoyens, de lutte contre la corruption, de participation citoyenne, d’innovation démocratique, ainsi que de mobilisation des nouvelles technologies au service d’une meilleure gouvernance.

Au fil des années, plus de 70 pays y ont adhéré. L’État fédéral belge ne l’a pas encore fait en 2017 [8]. La France, pourtant pionnière des processus délibératifs, mais aussi de l’Open Data, n’a rejoint le PGO qu’en 2014, mais en a assuré la coprésidence dès 2015, devenant la coorganisatrice du quatrième Sommet mondial du Partenariat pour un Gouvernement ouvert, qui s’est tenu dans la capitale française fin 2016. La Déclaration de Paris, qui y a été adoptée le 7 décembre 2016, rappelle l’ensemble des principes et valeurs fondatrices du PGO et s’engage à repousser les frontières des réformes au delà de la seule transparence, afin de faire progresser la participation, la redevabilité de l’administration et sa réactivité face aux attentes des citoyens. Les signataires de la Déclaration de Paris appellent également à bâtir de nouvelles alliances entre les acteurs publics et la société civile, menant à des services et à des processus de décision publics plus collaboratifs. Le texte appelle également au développement du Gouvernement ouvert dans les collectivités territoriales ainsi qu’au lancement d’initiatives participatives locales qui rapprochent le service public des citoyens [9].

Une culture de gouvernance orientée vers le citoyen

Pour répondre à la question de savoir ce qu’est véritablement un gouvernement ouvert, nous pourrions, avec Beth Simone Noveck, qui dirigea l’Open Government Initiative à la Maison-Blanche en 2009 et 2010, examiner le modèle fermé de décision (the closed model of decision-making). Cette juriste et professeure de Droit, diplômée de Yale et d’Harvard, estime en effet que le modèle fermé est celui qui a été façonné par Max Weber, Walter Lippmann et James Madison. Ce modèle laisse accroire que seuls les professionnels du gouvernement et leurs experts, selon eux-mêmes strictement objectifs [10], possèdent l’impartialité, l’expertise, les ressources, la discipline et le temps nécessaire pour prendre les bonnes décisions publiques. Cette vision, qui devrait être révolue, confine la participation du citoyen à la démocratie représentative au droit de suffrage, à l’adhésion à des groupes d’intérêt et à l’implication dans des activités citoyennes ou politiques locales. Or, nous savons clairement aujourd’hui que, pour de nombreuses raisons, les professionnels de la politique ne disposent ni du monopole de l’information ni de celui de l’expertise [11].

L’innovation technologique et ce qu’on appelle aujourd’hui l’innovation sociale numérique (Digital Social Innovation – DSI) [12] contribuent à cette évolution. Elles ne nous apparaissent pourtant pas le moteur principal des conceptions du Gouvernement ouvert, étant plutôt périphériques. Si la technologie y a quelque importance c’est peut-être davantage au niveau de la boîte à outils que des enjeux ou des finalités de ce processus. Le Gouvernement ouvert se situe dans une double tradition. D’une part, celle de la transparence et de la liberté d’accès aux données publiques à l’égard de la société civile. Celle-ci n’est pas nouvelle. Le Parlement britannique la faisait sienne dans les années 1990 [13]. D’autre part, le Gouvernement ouvert s’inspire des valeurs de partage et de collaboration en usage au sein des communautés liées aux mouvements du logiciel libre et de la science ouverte [14]. En ce sens, l’attente citoyenne pourrait être sublimée comme le sont certains chercheurs qui voient dans le Gouvernement ouvert la mesure par laquelle les citoyens peuvent suivre et influencer les processus gouvernementaux par l’accès à l’information gouvernementale et aux instances décisionnelles [15].

Même si on peut considérer que l’idée de Gouvernement ouvert est encore en construction [16], une définition peut néanmoins se stabiliser. En nous inspirant de la définition en anglais de l’OCDE, on peut concevoir le Gouvernement ouvert comme une culture de gouvernance orientée vers le citoyen, qui s’appuie sur des outils, des politiques ainsi que des pratiques innovantes et durables pour promouvoir la transparence, l’interactivité et l’imputabilité du gouvernement, afin de favoriser la participation des parties prenantes en soutien de la démocratie et de la croissance inclusive [17]. Ce processus a vocation de déboucher sur la coconstruction de politiques collectives impliquant tous les acteurs de la gouvernance (sphère publique, entreprises, société civile, etc.), visant l’intérêt général et le bien commun.

L’organisation internationale du PGO précise qu’une stratégie de gouvernement ouvert ne peut réellement se développer que lorsqu’elle est appuyée par un environnement adéquat qui lui permette de se déployer. La question du leadership des acteurs politiques est évidemment très importante, de même que la capacité des citoyens (leur empowerment) à participer effectivement à l’action publique : elle est au cœur des réformes qu’elle induit, ainsi que le notait l’organisation internationale. Aujourd’hui, en effet, les autorités sont conscientes de la nécessité d’aller au delà d’un simple rôle de prestataire des services publics, et de nouer des partenariats plus étroits avec toutes les parties prenantes concernées [18].

Le Gouvernement ouvert renoue donc avec une des définitions initiales de la gouvernance, telle que Steven Rosell l’avait formulée en 1992 : un processus par lequel une organisation ou une société se conduit elle-même, à partir de ses acteurs [19]. C’est en effet devenu une banalité de répéter que les défis auxquels nous sommes aujourd’hui confrontés ne peuvent plus être résolus, compte tenu de leur ampleur, par un gouvernement classique et quelques cohortes voire légions de fonctionnaires.

Néanmoins, face à ces enjeux, souvent colossaux, c’est avec raison que le professeur d’Administration des Affaires Doublas Schuler s’interroge sur la capacité d’action de l’ensemble de la société qui devrait être mobilisée et pose la question : serons-nous assez intelligents, assez tôt ? Pour y répondre, celui qui est aussi le président du Public Sphere Project fait appel à ce qu’il nomme l’intelligence civique, une forme d’intelligence collective orientée vers des défis partagés, qui se concentre sur l’amélioration de la société dans son ensemble et pas seulement sur l’individu. Le type de démocratie que fonde l’intelligence civique, écrit Douglas, est celui qui, comme l’écrivait le psychologue et philosophe américain John Dewey, peut être vu davantage comme un mode de vie que comme un devoir, celle dans laquelle la participation à un processus participatif renforce la citoyenneté des individus et leur permet de mieux penser en termes de communauté. La délibération est pour ce faire totalement essentielle. Elle peut être définie comme un processus de communication organisée dans lequel les personnes débattent de leurs préoccupations de façon raisonnable, consciencieuse et ouverte, avec l’objectif de parvenir à une décision [20]. La délibération se concrétise quand des personnes aux points de vue différents échangent dans l’intention de parvenir à un accord. Les prospectivistes le savent bien : le livrable attendu de la délibération est une vision plus cohérente de l’avenir [21].

Contrairement à ce que l’on pense généralement, les véritables processus de délibération restent rares, tant dans la sphère citoyenne que dans les cadres spécifiquement politiques et institutionnels. Beth Simone Noveck qualifie d’ailleurs la démocratie délibérative de timide, lui préférant la démocratie collaborative, plus orientée résultat, décision, et mieux encouragée par les technologies [22]. Ces processus constituent toutefois la méthode de base de dynamiques plus impliquantes comme la co-construction de politiques publiques ou de politiques collectives, débouchant sur la contractualisation des acteurs, l’additionnalité des financements, la mise en œuvre et l’évaluation partenariales. On mesure la distance qui sépare ces processus des simples consultations plus ou moins formelles, ou des concertations socio-économiques sur des modèles de type rhénan, voire mosan, qui remontent à l’immédiate Après Deuxième Guerre mondiale et qui ne sont certes plus à la hauteur pour répondre aux enjeux du XXIe siècle.

Les Nations Unies ne s’y sont pas trompées en ajoutant un objectif 17  » Partenariats pour la réalisation des objectifs » à l’objectif 16, déjà explicite, parmi ceux destinés à atteindre le développement durable et portant plus spécifiquement sur l’avènement de sociétés pacifiques et ouvertes à tous, l’accès global à la justice et des institutions efficaces, responsables et ouvertes à tous. Cet objectif 17 appelle la mise en place de partenariats efficaces entre les gouvernements, le secteur privé et la société civile : ces partenariats inclusifs construits sur des principes et des valeurs, une vision commune et des objectifs communs qui placent les peuples et la planète au centre sont nécessaires au niveau mondial, régional, national et local [23].

Régions et territoires ouverts

Lors de son intervention au forum du Partenariat pour un Gouvernement ouvert qui se réunissait en marge de la 72e Assemblée générale des Nations Unies le 19 septembre 2017, le Président Emmanuel Macron a notamment indiqué que les collectivités locales ont un rôle croissant à jouer et sont une échelle absolument incontournable du gouvernement ouvert [24]. Lors de sa campagne électorale, le futur président français avait d’ailleurs insisté sur le fait que les politiques publiques sont plus efficaces lorsqu’elles sont construites avec les concitoyens auxquels elles sont destinées. Et dans ce qu’il avait appelé la République contractuelle, celle qui fait confiance aux territoires, à la société et aux acteurs, l’ancien ministre voyait une nouvelle idée de la démocratie : ce ne sont pas des citoyens passifs qui délèguent à leurs responsables politiques la gestion de la nation. Une démocratie saine et moderne, c’est un régime composé de citoyens actifs, qui prennent leur part dans la transformation du pays [25].

Dans la lignée des travaux déjà menés depuis le début de la législature au sein du Parlement de Wallonie, la Déclaration de politique régionale wallonne du 28 juillet 2017 donne corps à cette évolution en appelant à un renouveau démocratique et à une amélioration de la gouvernance publique fondés sur quatre piliers que sont la transparence, la participation, la responsabilité et la performance. La transparence porte tant sur la lisibilité des normes et des réglementations, les modes de fonctionnement, les mécanismes et contenus des décisions que leur financement. La participation a pour but l’implication des citoyens et des acteurs privés, entreprises et monde associatif en leur donnant prioritairement l’initiative, l’Etat venant en appui et en encadrement stratégique. Le texte invoque une nouvelle citoyenneté de coopération, de débat public, d’information active et d’implication. La responsabilité ainsi promue est surtout celle du mandataire – élu ou désigné – et voit l’imputabilité s’accroître. Les relations entre pouvoirs publics et associations sont appelées à être clarifiées. La performance est ici définie au travers de l’évaluation d’impact de l’action publique en matières économique, budgétaire, d’emploi, environnementale et sociale. Elle fonde la volonté d’une simplification drastique des institutions publiques jugées – à juste titre – trop nombreuses et trop coûteuses [26].

On le voit, ces pistes sont intéressantes et constituent sans nul doute une avancée inspirée par l’idée de gouvernement ouvert que nous appelions dernièrement de nos vœux [27], même si elles ne franchissent pas encore l’étape d’une véritable gouvernance collaborative, de la délibération avec l’ensemble des acteurs et des citoyens, voire de la coconstruction des politiques publiques au delà des expériences de panels citoyens.

Conclusion : un gouvernement des citoyens, par les citoyens, pour les citoyens

Le Gouvernement ouvert n’est pas une affaire de technologie, mais de démocratie. Ce modèle renoue avec l’idée d’Abraham Lincoln d’un government of the people, by the people, for the people, qui clôture son discours de Gettysburg du 19 novembre 1863 [28]. Cette idée forte peut constituer un atout pour toutes les régions d’Europe, pour ses États ainsi que pour la dynamique européenne dans sa totalité. Ici, comme aux États-Unis, le principe du Gouvernement ouvert doit être porté par tous les mandataires et appliqué à tous les niveaux de gouvernance [29]. Les parlements autant que les conseils régionaux doivent s’en saisir, eux qui ont souvent déjà amorcé des dynamiques pionnières [30].

Comme le dit encore Douglas Schuler, un gouvernement ouvert n’aurait aucun sens s’il ne s’accompagnait d’une citoyenneté informée, consciente et engagée, s’il ne signifiait pas une gouvernance totalement distribuée dans la population, la fin du gouvernement comme unique lieu de gouvernance. Dès lors, ce constat renvoie à la question initiale : quelles sont les capacités et les informations dont les citoyennes et les citoyens ont besoin pour se saisir des enjeux auxquels ils ont à faire face ? [31] On connaît la réponse de Thomas Jefferson écrivant depuis Paris en 1789 au philosophe Richard Price : Un sens de la nécessité, et une soumission à elle, est pour moi une preuve nouvelle et consolatrice que, partout où les citoyens sont bien informés, on peut leur faire confiance ainsi qu’à leur gouvernement; chaque fois que les choses deviennent si fausses au point d’attirer leur attention, elles peuvent être invoquées pour les ramener dans leurs droits [32]. Assurément, cette question appelle une réponse liée à l’éducation critique tout au long de la vie, à l’importance de la philosophie, de l’histoire, de l’apprentissage de la citoyenneté, de la prospective et de la complexité dont nous avons reparlé voici peu de temps [33]. Comme le note Pierre Rosanvallon, il s’agit de rendre la société lisible pour le citoyen, de faire en sorte qu’il puisse disposer d’une connaissance effective du monde social et des mécanismes qui le régissent, de permettre aux individus d’avoir accès à ce que le professeur au Collège de France appelle la citoyenneté réelle : compréhension des rapports sociaux effectifs, mécanismes de redistribution, problèmes que rencontre la réalisation d’une société des égaux [34].

Nous n’avons cessé de le répéter, le Gouvernement ouvert et la gouvernance par les acteurs, appellent une société ouverte [35], c’est-à-dire un espace commun, une communauté des citoyennes et des citoyens où tous joignent leurs efforts pour envisager des enjeux partagés et y répondre en vue d’un bien commun. Le passage du Gouvernement ouvert à l’État ouvert se fait par extension et applications des principes évoqués, de l’exécutif au législatif et au pouvoir judiciaire, ainsi qu’à tous les acteurs en amont et en aval.

Là où les gouvernements nationaux n’ont pas encore lancé leur stratégie de gouvernance ouverte, il conviendrait de commencer par les territoires, les villes et les régions qui ont souvent pour elles l’avantage de la souplesse et de la proximité avec les acteurs, les citoyennes et les citoyens. Cette nécessité implique aussi, bien entendu, que les organisations privées soient, elles aussi, plus transparentes, plus ouvertes, davantage actrices.

Mettre en cohérence ces ambitions globales, portées par les Nations Unies, celles relayées par l’OCDE, l’Europe et plus de 70 nations dans le monde, avec les attentes de nos acteurs régionaux, paraît à portée de main. A nous de mener cette tâche à bien avec enthousiasme et détermination, où que nous soyons situés dans cette société qui rêve d’un monde meilleur.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

 

[1] Barack OBAMA, Change, We Can Believe in, Three Rivers Press, 2008. Traduit en français sous le titre Le changement, Nous pouvons y croire, p. 180, Paris, Odile Jacob, 2009.

[2] Ibidem.

[3] Ibidem, p. 181sv.

[4] Sur l’accountability, qu’il préfère traduire par reddition de comptes, voir Pierre ROSANVALLON, Le bon gouvernement, p. 269sv, Paris, Seuil, 2015.

[5] Memo from President Obama on Transparency and Open Government, January 21, 2009. Reproduit dans Daniel LATHROP & Laurel RUMA ed., Open Government, Transparency, and Participation in Practice, p. 389-390, Sebastopol, CA, O’Reilly, 2010.

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=85677

[6] Voir pour les rétroactes aux Etats-Unis : Patrice McDERMOTT, Building Open Government, in Governement Information Quartely, n°27, 2010, p. 401-413.

[7] Déclaration commune pour un gouvernement ouvert, https://www.opengovpartnership.org/d-claration-commune-pour-un-gouvernement-ouvert

[8] La Belgique n’est toujours pas membre du Partenariat pour un Gouvernement ouvert, dans Le Vif-L’Express, 11 août 2017.

[9] Déclaration de Paris, 4e Sommet mondial du Partenariat pour un Gouvernement ouvert, Open Governement Partnershio, 7 décembre 2016. https://www.opengovpartnership.org/paris-declaration

Cliquer pour accéder à OGP-Summit_PARIS-DECLARATION_FR.pdf

[10] Voir Philip E. TETLOCK, Expert Political Judgment, How good is it ? How can we know ? Princeton NJ, Princeton University Press, 2005.

[11] Beth Simone NOVECK, Wiki Government: How technology can make government better, democracy stranger, and citizens more powerful, Brookings Institution Press, 2009. – The Single point of Failure, in Daniel LATHROP & Laurel RUMA ed., Open Government, Transparency, and Participation in Practice, p. 50, Sebastopol, CA, O’Reilly, 2010. Pour une approche empirique de la Gouvernance ouverte, voir Albert J. MEIJER et al., La gouvernance ouverte : relier visibilité et moyens d’expression, dans Revue internationale des Sciences administratives 2012/1 (Vol. 78), p. 13-32, en pointant cette formule : la gouvernance ouverte est une question bien trop importante pour la confier à des « technophiles » : des scientifiques et des praticiens ayant une formation en droit, en économie, en science politique et en administration publique doivent également intervenir et se servir de leurs connaissances disciplinaires pour mettre en place les liens nécessaires entre visibilité et moyens d’expression en vue de faciliter la citoyenneté active. (p. 29-30)

[12] Matt STOKES, Peter BAECK, Toby BAKER, What next for Digital Social Innovation?, Realizing the potential of people and technology to tackle social challenges, European Commission, DSI4EU, Nesta Report, May 2017. https://www.nesta.org.uk/sites/default/files/dsi_report.pdf

[13] Freedom of access to information on the environment (1st report, Session 1996-97)

https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld199697/ldselect/ldeucom/069xii/ec1233.htm

[14] Romain BADOUARD (maître de conférences à l’Université Cergy-Pontoise), Open governement, open data : l’empowerment citoyen en question, dans Clément MABI, Jean-Christophe PLANTIN et Laurence MONNOYER-SMITH dir., Ouvrir, partager, réutiliser, Regards critiques sur les données numériques, Paris, Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, 2017 http://books.openedition.org/editionsmsh/9067

[15] the extent to which citizens can monitor and influence governement processes through access to governement information and access to decision-making arenas. Albert J. MEIJER, Deirdre CURTIN & Maarten HILLEBRANDT, Open Governement: Connecting vision and voice, in International Review of Administrative Sciences, 78, 10-29, p. 13.

[16] Douglas SCHULER, Online Deliberation and Civic Intelligence dans D. LATHROP & L. RUMA ed., Open Government…, p. 92sv. – voir aussi l’intéressante analyse de Emad A. ABU-SHANAB, Reingineering the open government concept: An empirical support for a proposed model, in Government Information Quartely, n°32, 2015, p. 453-463.

[17] a citizen-centred culture of governance that utilizes innovative and sustainable tools, policies and practices to promote government transparency, responsiveness and accountability to foster stakeholders’ participation in support of democracy and inclusive growth”. OECD, Open Governement, The Global context and the way forward, p. 19, Paris, OECD Publishing, 2016. – En novembre 2017, l’OCDE a publié cet ouvrage en français, utilisant la définition suivante : une culture de la gouvernance qui se fonde sur des politiques et pratiques novatrices, durables et inspirées des principes de transparence, de redevabilité et de participation pour favoriser la démocratie et la croissance inclusive.

OCDE, Gouvernement ouvert : Contexte mondial et perspectives, Editions OCDE, Paris. 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264280984-fr

 

[18] OCDE, Panorama des administrations publiques, p. 198, Paris, OCDE, 2017. – Voir aussi, p. 29 et 30 du même ouvrage, des définitions spécifiques mises au point dans différents pays.

[19] Steven A. ROSELL ea, Governing in an Information Society, Montréal, 1992.

[20] Douglas SCHULER, Online Deliberation and Civic Intelligence... p. 93.

[21] Ibidem.

[22] B. S. NOVECK, op.cit., p. 62-63.

[23] Objectifs du développement durable, 17 objectifs pour transformer le monde.

http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/fr/globalpartnerships/

[24] Allocution du Président de la République Emmanuel Macron lors de l’événement de l’Open Government Partnership en marge de la 72e Assemblée Générale des Nations Unies (19 Septembre 2017) – http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x61l75r

[25] Emmanuel MACRON, Révolution, p. 255-256 et 259, Paris, XO, 2016.

[26] Parlement wallon, Session 2016-2017, Déclaration de politique régionale, « La Wallonie plus forte », 28 juillet 2017, DOC 880(2016-2017) – N°1, p. 3-5.

[27] Olivier MOUTON, Une thérapie de choc pour la Wallonie, dans Le Vif-L’Express, n°44, 3 novembre 2017, p. 35.

[28] Carl MALAMUD, By the People, dans D. LATHROP & L. RUMA ed., Open Government…, p. 41.

[29] Ibidem, p. 46.

[30] David BEETHAM, Parlement et démocratie au vingt-et-unième siècle, Guide des bonnes pratiques, Genève, Union parlementaire, 2006.

[31] D. SCHULER, Online Deliberation and Civic Intelligence... p. 93.

[32] A sense of necessity, and a submission to it, is to me a new and consolatory proof that, whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government; that, whenever things get so far wrong as to attract their notice, they may be relied on to set them to rights. Letter To Richard Prices, Paris, January 8, 1789, dans Thomas JEFFERSON, Writings, p. 935, New-York, The Library of America, 1984.

[33] Ph. DESTATTE, Apprendre au XXIème siècle, Citoyenneté, complexité et prospective, Liège, 22 septembre 2017. https://phd2050.org/2017/10/09/apprendre/

[34] P. ROSANVALLON, Le bon gouvernement, p. 246.

[35] Archon FUNG & David WEIL, Open Government and open society, dans D. LATHROP & L. RUMA ed., Open Government…, p. 41.