archive

Archives de Tag: Patrice Duran

Namur, April 11, 2018

There are some words that we try in vain to translate but do not manage to clarify satisfactorily. This is the case with the English words policy and policies. We can, of course, get close to the meaning when, in French, we allude to une politique [1] or les politiques publiques. Except that policy does not necessarily relate to a political context [2] and does not always belong to the register of the public arena. The Oxford English Dictionary defines policy as a course or principle of action adopted or proposed by an organisation or individual [3]. Policies can therefore be organisational, corporate, individual or collective, and can assume multiple forms, from intention to action, including streams of ideas and their execution in legislation, regulatory implementation and everyday changes [4]. For a long time, the Anglo-Saxon academic world has adopted the distinction between politics and policies, indicating moreover that policies may be public. Thus the London School of Economics and Political Science distinguishes between British Politics and Policy and UK Government, Politics and Policy [5].

 

1. Intentions, decisions, objectives and implementation

Drawing its inspiration from the works of theorists in the concept, especially the Yale University professors Harold Dwight Lasswell (1902-1978) [6] and Aaron Wildavsky (1930-1993) [7], the Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration (ed. 2015) defines Policy as a decision or, more broadly, a series of interlinked decisions relating to a range of objectives and the means of implementing them. The author of the definition, William H. Park, a lecturer and researcher at a British military academy [8], states that this process involves identifying a problem that requires a solution or an objective that is worth achieving, evaluating the alternative means of attaining the desired results, choosing between these alternatives and implementing the preferred option, in addition to solving the problem or achieving the objective. Park observes that such a process should entail the participation of a limited number of decision-makers, a high degree of consensus on what constitutes a policy problem or a desirable objective, a capacity for evaluating and comparing the probable consequences of each of the alternatives, a smooth implementation of the chosen option and the absence of any impediments to achieving the objectives. This also implies that this process ends with the execution and implementation of the decision [9]. Clearly, however difficult it may be to grasp the notion, it is above all the rationality of the process that seems to characterise it [10]. There is also the fact that, as Lasswell points out, policy approaches tend toward contextuality in place of fragmentation and toward problem-oriented not problem-blind perspectives [11]. This second consideration points to the systemic aspect, which we prioritise in foresight – even if it is beyond the context. Furthermore, according to the Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, policy studies and foresight share the characteristic of being explicitly normative and fundamentally action-oriented [12]. They are also normative because they rely on values that determine their objectives. In what Yehezkel Dror calls Grand Policies, the common good, the public interest and the good of humanity as a whole, or raison d’humanité, are pursued to highlight strategies. As the former professor of political science and politics at Harvard and the University of Jerusalem points out, Grand Policies try to reduce the probability of bad futures, to increase the probability of good futures, as their images and evaluations change with time, and to gear up to coping with the unforeseen and the unforeseeable[13]. Unsurprisingly, to achieve this, Dror particularly recommends engaging in thinking-in-History and practising foresight [14].

2. In governance: identifying and organising the actors

Democratic governance, in other words governance by the actors, – including the Administration [15] –, particularly as highlighted since the early 1990s by the Club of Rome and the United Nations Development Programme[16], also shows, as sociologist Patrice Duran has pointed out, that government institutions have lost their monopoly on governance [17]. This observation was also made by David Richards and Martin J. Smith in their analysis of the links between governance and public policy in the United Kingdom. For these two British political scientists, governance demands that we consider all the actors and locations beyond the « core executive » involved in the policy making process [18]. If we take proper account of this trend, we can make a distinction, as Duran does, between the two complementary rationales on which public action as a process is founded:

– an identification rationale, which makes it possible to determine the relevant actors, define the scope of their involvement and specify their degree of legitimacy; the challenge relates to the status of the actors in the sense that this determines their authority and thereby their legitimacy to act.

– a rationale for organising these actors for the purpose of producing effective action. The actors are also evaluated on what they do, in other words on their contribution to dealing with the problems identified as public problems which are therefore the responsibility of the public authorities. It is their power to act, in the sense of their capacity to act, that is at stake here rather than their authority [19]. This way of understanding governance and of giving the government an instrumental role in collective action has been at the heart of our approach for twenty years [20]. It clearly implies societal objectives that support a vision, shared by the actors, of a desirable future for all. We have often summarised these objectives as being the shared requirement for greater democracy and better development [21]. But, as Philippe Moreau Defarges rightly pointed out, the public interest no longer comes from the top down, but develops, flows and belongs to whoever exploits it [22]. Moreover, it is from this perspective that the rationale of empowerment is not only reserved for elected officials with responsibility for the issues under their mandate but extends to other stakeholders in distributed, shared, democratic governance [23], especially the Administration, businesses and civil society [24].

3. Supporting a Policy Lab for the Independent Regional Foresight Unit

Following the meeting with Minister-President Willy Borsus on 15 September 2017 and with the board of directors of the The Destree Institute on 5 December 2017, the Destree Institute revived its Foresight Unit under the name CiPré (Cellule indépendante de Prospective régionale – Independent Regional Foresight Unit) and backed the creation of a laboratory for collective, public and entrepreneurial policies for Wallonia in Europe: the Wallonia Policy Lab. This has been modelled on the EU Policy Lab, set up by the European Joint Research Centre and presented by Fabiana Scapolo, deputy head of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, during the conference entitled Learning in the 21st century: citizenship, foresight and complexity, organised in the Economic and Social Council of Wallonia by The Destree Institute on 22 September 2017 as part of the Wallonia Young Foresight Research programme.

According to its own introduction, the European Policy Lab represents a collaborative and experimental space for developing innovative public or collective policies. Both a physical space and a way of working which combines foresight, behavioural insights [25], and the process of co-creation and innovation, in other words design thinking [26], the European Lab has set itself three tasks: firstly, to explore complexity and the long term in order to measure uncertainty; secondly, to bring together political objectives and collective actions and to improve decision-making and the reality of implementing decisions; and finally, to find solutions for developing better public or collective policies and to ensure that the strategies will apply in the real world [27]. We have embraced these tasks in Wallonia, in addition to our collaborations with the European Joint Research Centre, particularly on the project entitled The Future of Government 2030+, A Citizen Centric Perspective on New Government Models.

The proposal to create a Policy Lab seemed so important to the board of directors of The Destree Institute that it decided to accentuate its own name with this designation: The Destree Institute, Wallonia Policy Lab. This decision conveys three messages: the first is the operationalisation of foresight, which characterises the type of foresight that brings about change, as advocated by The Destree Institute. The University Certificate which it has jointly run with UMONS and the Open University in Charleroi since February 2017 is also called Operational Foresight [28]. The second message is the need for accelerated experimentation on a new, more involving democracy, based on governance by actors and innovative tools such as those developed globally in recent years around the concept of open government [29]. The third message concerns the uninhibited use of English and therefore the desire for internationalisation, even if the language chosen could have been that of one of our dynamic neighbours, Germany or the Netherlands, or of another country. Unrestrained access and openness to the world are absolute necessities for a region undergoing restructuring which, today, must more than ever position itself away from the faint-heartedness of yesterday.

In parallel, having run its course at the end of December 2017, the Wallonia Evaluation and Foresight Society, founded in 1999 on the initiative of The Destree Institute and several actors who were convinced of the need for these governance tools and advocated their use, decided to encourage this new initiative by sponsoring the Wallonia Policy Lab in terms of its intellectual and material heritage. This also means that, as it did at the end of the 1990s, The Destree Institute will once again, through this laboratory, pay close attention to the assessment and performance of public and collective policies which, naturally, represent one of the key axes of the policy process.

Conclusion: bringing order to future disorder

When we talk of Policy, we are referring to a course of action or a structured programme of actions guided by a vision of the future (principles, broad objectives, goals), which address some clearly identified challenges [30]. The process of governance, which has been in place since the early 2000s, has increased the need for a better grasp of policies by involving the stakeholders. Interdependence between the actors is an integral part of modern political action, changing it from public action into collective action.

It has been argued and repeatedly stated that, in the territories, and particularly in the regions, the doors to the future open downwards. Patrice Duran, referring to Michael Lipsky, the political scientist at Princeton [31], observed that changes usually resulted from the daily actions taken on the ground by public officials or peripheral actors rather than from the broad objectives set by the major decision centres. We, too, agree with the French professor that there is no point in developing ambitious objectives if they cannot usefully be translated into action content. In other words, it is not so much developing major programmes that counts but rather determining the process by which a decision may or may not emerge and take shape [32]. It’s certainly not going to happen overnight. Particular attention must be paid to the serious implementation of the objectives we set ourselves. Developing policies means – and this something we have forgotten rather too often in Wallonia in recent decades – carefully linking the key strategic directions to the concrete reality of the fieldwork and mobilising the diversity of actors operating on the ground [33]. That is how, using all our pragmatism, we can bring order to disorder, to use Philippe Zittoun’s well-turned phrase [34].

Moreover, two early initiatives have been taken in this regard. The first, as part of a joint initiative taken in November 2017, was to transform a hands-on training activity, Local powers and Social action, organised with the Wallonia Public Service DG05, into a genuine laboratory for those public officials to create their business practices of the future. The second initiative, at the beginning of February 2018, was to put together the « Investing in young people” citizens’ panel, which is being organised on the initiative of the Parliament of Wallonia by a Policy Lab that brings young people together to identify long-term challenges. In both cases, the participants needed to be quick, intellectually mobile, efficient, proactive, bright and operational. And that was the case. More on this in due course…

The Wallonia Policy Lab is very much in line with this moment in our history: a time when we are moving from grand ideological principles to experimentation – on the ground – with new, collective, concrete actions with a view to implementing them. This way of working will finally allow us to overcome our endemic shortcomings, our structural blockages and our mental and cultural inertia so that we can truly address the challenges we face. A time when, ultimately, we must stand together.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

[1] See, for example, the definition of Policy/Politique in the MEANS programme: ensemble d’activités différentes (programmes, procédures, lois, règlements) qui sont dirigées vers un même but, un même objectif général. Evaluer les programmes socio-économiques, Glossaire de 300 concepts et termes techniques, coll. MEANS, vol. 6., p. 33, European Commission, Community Structural Funds, 1999. – My thanks to my colleagues Pascale Van Doren and Michaël Van Cutsem for helping me develop and refine this document.

[2] Philippe ZITTOUN, La fabrique politique des politiques publiques, Une approche pragmatique de l’action publique, p. 10sv, Paris, Presses de Sciences Po, 2013. – Thierry BALZACQ e.a., Fondements de Science politique, p. 33, Louvain-la-Neuve, De Boeck, 2015. – See the broad discussion of the concept of policy in Michaël HILL & Frederic VARONE, The Public Policy Process, p. 16-23, New York & London, Routledge, 7th ed., 2017.

[3] A course or principle of action adopted or proposed by an organisation or individual. Oxford English Dictionary on line.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/policy (2 April 2018).

[4] Edward C. PAGE, The Origins of Policy, in Michael MORAN, Martin REIN & Robert E. GOODIN, Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, p. 210sv, Oxford University Press, 2006. – Brian W. HOGWOOD & Lewis A. GUNN, Policy Analysis for the Real World, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1984.

[5] See the blog of the London School of Economics and Political Science: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/

[6] Harold Dwight LASSWELL, A Pre-View of Policy Sciences, New York, American Elsevier, 1971.

[7] Aaron WILDAVSKY, Speaking Truth to Power, The Art and Craft of Policy Analysis, Boston, Little Brown, 1979.

[8] Joint Services Command and Staff College (JSCSC), now teaching at King’s College in London.

[9] William H. PARK, Policy, 4, in Jay M. SHAFRITZ Jr. ed., Defining Public Administration, Selections from the International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration, New York, Routledge, 2018.

[10] M. HILL & F. VARONE, The Public Policy Process…, p. 20. – Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 35, Paris, Lextenso, 2010.

[11] H. D. LASSWELL, A Pre-View of Policy Sciences…, p. 8.

[12] Oxford Handbook of Public Policy…, p. 6.

[13] Yehezkel DROR, Training for Policy Makers, in Handbook…, p. 82-86.

[14] Ibidem, p. 86sv.

[15] Edward C. PAGE, Policy without Politicians, Bureaucratic Influence in Comparative Perspective, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2012.

[16] Philippe DESTATTE, L’élaboration d’un nouveau contrat social, in Philippe DESTATTE dir., Mission prospective Wallonie 21, La Wallonie à l’écoute de la prospective, Premier Rapport au Ministre-Président du Gouvernement wallon, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 2003. 21 http://www.wallonie-en-ligne.net/Wallonie_Prospective/Mission-Prosp_W21/Rapport-2002/3-2_nouveau-contrat-social.htm – Steven A. ROSELL e.a., Governing in an Information Society, p. 21, Montréal, Institute for Research on Public Policy, 1992.

[17] Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 77, Paris, Lextenso, 2010.

[18] Thus, it demands that we consider all the actors and locations beyond the « core executive » involved in the policy making process. David RICHARDS & Martin J. SMITH, Governance and Public Policy in the UK, p. 2, Oxford University Press, 2002.

[19] P. DURAN, Penser l’action publique…, p. 76-77. Our translation.

[20] Ph. DESTATTE, Bonne gouvernance: contractualisation, évaluation et prospective, Trois atouts pour une excellence régionale, in Ph. DESTATTE dir., Evaluation, prospective et développement régional, p. 7sv, Charleroi, Institut-Destrée, 2001.

[21] Ph. DESTATTE, Plus de démocratie et un meilleur développement, Rapport général du quatrième Congrès La Wallonie au futur, dans La Wallonie au futur, Sortir du XXème siècle: évaluation, innovation, prospective, p. 436, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 1999.

[22] Philippe MOREAU DEFARGES, La gouvernance, p. 33, Paris, PuF, 2003.

[23] Gilles PAQUET, Gouvernance: mode d’emploi, Montréal, Liber, 2008.

[24] Policy analysts use the imperfect tools of their trade not only to assist legitimately elected officials in implementing their democratic mandates, but also to empower some groups rather than others. Oxford Handbook of Public Policy…, p. 28.

[25] Behavioural Insights is an inductive approach to policy making that combines insights from psychology, cognitive science, and social science with empirically-tested results to discover how humans actually make choices. Since 2013, OECD has been at the forefront of supporting public institutions who are applying behavioural insights to improving public policy. http://www.oecd.org/gov/regulatory-policy/behavioural-insights.htm

[26] See, for example, Paola COLETTI, Evidence for Public Policy Design, How to Learn from Best Practice, Palgrave Macmillan, New York – Houndmills Basingstoke UK, 2013.

[27] EU Policy Lab, a collaborative and experimental space for innovative policy-making, Brussels; European Commission, Joint Research Centre, 2017.

[28]  www.institut-destree.org/Certificat_Prospective_operationnelle

[29] Ph. DESTATTE, What is Open Government? Blog PhD2050, Reims, 7 November 2017,

https://phd2050.org/2017/11/14/open-gov/

[30] Concerning identification of the challenges: Charles E. LINDBLOM, Policy-making Process, p. 12-14, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice-Hall, 1968.

[31] Michael LIPSKY, Street Level Bureaucracy, New York, Russel Sage, 1980.

[32] Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 48, Paris, Lextenso, 2010. Our translation.

[33] Jeffrey L. PRESSMAN & Aaron WILDAWSKY, Implementation, Berkeley CA, University of California Press, 1973. – Susan BARRETT & Colin FUDGE eds, Policy and Action, Essays on the Implementation of Public Policy, London, Methuen, 1981.

[34] Ph. ZITTOUN, op.cit., p. 326. Our translation.

Namur, le 9 avril 2018

Il est des termes que l’on tente en vain de traduire sans parvenir à les clarifier de manière satisfaisante. C’est le cas des mots anglais policy ou policies. On peut bien sûr en approcher le sens lorsqu’on évoque une politique [1], voire les politiques publiques. Sauf que policy ne s’inscrit pas nécessairement dans un contexte politique [2], et n’appartient pas toujours au registre de la sphère publique. L’Oxford English Dictionary définit policy comme un parcours ou un principe d’action adopté ou proposé par une organisation ou un individu. [3] Les policies peuvent donc être organisationnelles, d’entreprises, individuelles ou collectives… et prendre des formes multiples, de l’intention à l’action, jusqu’au courant d’idées et leurs réalisations dans la législation, la mise en œuvre réglementaire et le changement quotidien [4]. Le monde académique anglo-saxon a adopté depuis longtemps la distinction entre politics et policies, précisant par ailleurs que ces dernières peuvent être public. Ainsi, la London School of Economics and Political Science distingue-t-elle entre British Politics and Policy, ou encore UK Government, Politics and Policy [5].

1. Intentions, décisions, objectifs et mise en œuvre

S’inspirant notamment des travaux des théoriciens du concept, en particulier des professeurs de l’Université de Yale Harold Dwight Lasswell (1902-1978) [6] et Aaron Wildavsky (1930-1993) [7], l’Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration (éd. 2015) définit Policy comme une décision ou, plus généralement, un ensemble de décisions interreliées relatives à un choix d’objectifs et les moyens de les réaliser. L’auteur de la notice, William H. Park, enseignant-chercheur à l’Académie militaire britannique [8], précise que ce processus comporte l’identification d’un problème appelant une solution ou un objectif qui mérite d’être atteint, l’évaluation des moyens alternatifs permettant les résultats désirés, le choix parmi ces alternatives, la mise en œuvre de l’option préférée, ainsi que la solution du problème ou la réalisation de l’objectif. Park observe qu’un tel processus devrait impliquer la participation d’un nombre restreint de décideurs, un degré élevé de consensus sur ce qui constitue un policy problem ou un objectif souhaitable, une capacité d’évaluer et de comparer les conséquences probables de chacune des alternatives, une mise en œuvre harmonieuse de l’option choisie, ainsi que l’absence d’obstacle à la réalisation des objectifs. Cela implique également que ce processus soit terminé par la réalisation et la mise en œuvre de la décision [9]. On le voit, quelle que soit la difficulté d’appréhender la notion, c’est surtout la rationalité du processus qui semble le caractériser [10]. Le fait aussi que, ainsi que le souligne Lasswell, les Policy approaches s’inscrivent dans leur contexte au lieu d’être fragmentées et que les perspectives sont axées sur les problèmes (problem-oriented) et non le contraire (problem-blind) [11]. Cette dernière considération nous renvoie à la systémique, que nous privilégions en prospective – même si elle est davantage que le contexte. Du reste, à en croire l’Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, les Policy studies partagent avec la prospective le fait d’être explicitement normatives et fondamentalement orientées vers l’action [12]. Normatives, elles le sont aussi en s’appuyant sur des valeurs qui déterminent leurs objectifs. Dans ce que Yehezkel Dror appelle les Grand Policies, le bien commun, l’intérêt général, la raison d’humanité (good of humanity as a whole) sont recherchés comme fléchage des stratégies. Comme l’indique l’ancien professeur de Sciences politiques à Harvard et à l’Université de Jérusalem, les Grand Policies tentent de réduire la probabilité de futurs néfastes, d’augmenter la probabilité de futurs favorables, tandis que leurs images et leurs évaluations changent avec le temps. Elles tentent aussi à se préparer à faire face à l’imprévu et l’imprévisible [13]. Sans que cela nous étonne, pour y parvenir, Dror préconise notamment de s’inscrire dans une pensée à la mesure de l’histoire (thinking-in-History) et de pratiquer le foresight, c’est-à-dire la prospective [14].

 2. Dans la gouvernance : identifier et articuler les acteurs

La gouvernance démocratique, c’est-à-dire le gouvernement par les acteurs, – y compris l’Administration [15] -, telle que notamment valorisée depuis le début des années 1990 par le Club de Rome et le Programme des Nations Unies pour le Développement [16], montre aussi, comme l’a relevé le sociologue Patrice Duran, que les institutions gouvernementales ont perdu le monopole de la conduite des affaires publiques [17]. Ce constat était également celui de David Richards et Martin J. Smith dans leur analyse des liens entre la gouvernance et la public policy au Royaume Uni. Pour ces deux politologues britanniques, la gouvernance exige que nous considérions tous les acteurs et tous les lieux de décisions au-delà du « noyau exécutif » impliqué dans le processus d’élaboration des politiques [18]. Si l’on prend bien en compte cette évolution, on peut distinguer, avec Duran, les deux logiques complémentaires qui fondent l’action publique en tant que processus :

– une logique d’identification qui permet de déterminer les acteurs pertinents, de situer la portée de leurs interventions et de préciser le degré de leur légitimité ; l’enjeu est celui du statut des acteurs au sens où celui-ci détermine leur autorité, et par là même leur légitimité à agir.

– une logique d’articulation de ces mêmes acteurs en vue de produire de l’action efficace. Les acteurs sont aussi évalués pour ce qu’ils font, c’est-à-dire pour leur contribution au traitement des problèmes identifiés comme publics, donc du ressort des autorités publiques. C’est moins leur autorité qui est en jeu ici que leur pouvoir, au sens de capacité à agir [19]. Cette manière d’appréhender la gouvernance et de rendre un rôle déterminant au gouvernement dans l’action collective est, depuis vingt ans, au cœur de notre approche [20]. Elle implique évidemment des finalités sociétales qui sous-tendent une vision commune aux acteurs d’un avenir souhaitable pour toutes et tous. Nous les avons souvent résumées par l’exigence partagée de plus de démocratie et d’un meilleur développement [21]. Mais comme l’indiquait justement Philippe Moreau Defarges, l’intérêt général n’est plus donné d’en haut mais se construit, circule et appartient à celui qui l’exploite [22]. C’est d’ailleurs dans cette perspective que la logique d’encapacitation (empowerment) n’y est pas seulement réservée aux élus en charge des affaires dans le cadre de leur mandat mais s’étend à d’autres parties-prenantes de la gouvernance démocratique, partagée, distribuée [23], en particulier l’Administration, les entreprises ainsi que la société civile [24].

3. Adosser un Policy Lab à la Cellule indépendante de Prospective régionale

Faisant suite à la rencontre avec le Ministre-Président Willy Borsus le 15 septembre 2017 ainsi qu’au Conseil d’administration de l’Institut Destrée du 5 décembre 2017, l’Institut Destrée a réactivé son Pôle Prospective sous l’appellation de CiPré (Cellule indépendante de Prospective régionale) et y a adossé un laboratoire des politiques collectives, publiques et entrepreneuriales (policies) de la Wallonie en Europe : le Wallonia Policy Lab. Celui-ci a été créé sur le modèle de l’EU Policy Lab, mis en place par l’European Joint Research Center et qui a été présenté par Fabiana Scapolo, cheffe adjointe du Centre commun de Recherche de la Commission européenne au Conseil économique et social de Wallonie lors du colloque Apprendre au XXIème siècle : citoyenneté, prospective et complexité, y organisé par l’Institut Destrée le 22 septembre 2017 dans le cadre du programme Wallonia Young Foresight Research.

L’European Policy Lab constitue, ainsi qu’il se présente lui-même, un espace collaboratif et expérimental destiné à fabriquer des politiques publiques ou collectives innovantes. A la fois espace physique et manière de travailler qui combine la prospective (Foresight), l’analyse des comportements (Behavioural Insights) [25], et le processus de co-créativité et d’innovation (Design Thinking) [26], le Lab européen s’est donné trois tâches : d’abord, explorer la complexité et le long terme afin de prendre la mesure de l’incertitude ; ensuite, faire se rencontrer les objectifs politiques et les actions collectives ainsi qu’améliorer les prises de décisions et la réalité de leur mise en œuvre ; enfin, trouver des solutions pour construire de meilleures politiques publiques ou collectives et s’assurer que les stratégies vont s’appliquer dans le monde réel [27]. Ces tâches, nous les avons faites nôtres en Wallonie, au-delà des collaborations que nous entretenons avec le Joint Research Centre européen, en particulier sur le projet The Future of Government 2030+, A Citizen Centric Perspective on New Governement Models.

La proposition de créer un Policy Lab est apparue tellement importante au Conseil d’administration de l’Institut Destrée, qu’il a décidé de souligner son propre nom par cette dénomination : Institut Destrée, The Wallonia Policy Lab. Ce choix est porteur de trois messages : le premier, c’est l’opérationnalisation de la prospective, ce qui caractérise le type de prospective porteuse de changement que promeut l’Institut Destrée. Le Certificat d’université qu’il co-organise depuis février 2017 avec l’UMONS et l’Université ouverte à Charleroi s’appelle d’ailleurs Prospective opérationnelle [28]. Le deuxième message est la nécessité d’une expérimentation accélérée d’une nouvelle démocratie plus impliquante, fondée sur une gouvernance d’acteurs ainsi que des outils innovants comme ceux développés au niveau mondial ces dernières années autour du concept de gouvernement ouvert [29]. Le troisième message porte sur l’usage décomplexé de l’anglais et donc sur la volonté d’internationalisation, même si la langue choisie aurait pu être celle d’un de nos dynamiques voisins : l’Allemagne ou les Pays-Bas, voire d’autres. L’accès et l’ouverture décomplexés au monde constituent des nécessités absolues pour une région en redéploiement qui, aujourd’hui, doit plus que jamais se positionner loin des frilosités d’hier.

Parallèlement, arrivée au bout de sa course fin de décembre 2017, la Société wallonne de l’Évaluation et de la Prospective, fondée à l’initiative de l’Institut Destrée et de plusieurs acteurs promoteurs et convaincus de la nécessité de ces outils de gouvernance en 1999, a décidé d’encourager cette nouvelle initiative en patronnant le Wallonia Policy Lab de ses héritages intellectuels et matériels. Cela signifie également que, comme il le faisait à la fin des années 1990, l’Institut Destrée va, au travers de ce laboratoire, prêter à nouveau une grande attention à l’évaluation et à la performance des politiques publiques et collectives qui constitue, bien entendu, un des axes forts du Policy Process.

Conclusion : mettre de l’ordre dans le désordre du futur

Lorsqu’on parle de Policy, on vise une ligne de conduite ou un programme structuré d’actions guidés par une vision de l’avenir (principes, grands objectifs, finalités), qui répond à des enjeux clairement identifiés [30]. Le processus de gouvernance, en vigueur depuis le début des années 2000, a accru la nécessité de mieux appréhender les politiques en y impliquant les parties prenantes. L’interdépendance entre les acteurs est constitutive de l’action politique moderne qui fait passer cette dernière de l’action publique à l’action collective.

Il a été soutenu et répété que, dans les territoires, et en particulier les régions, les portes de l’avenir s’ouvrent par le bas. Patrice Duran, faisant référence au politologue de Princeton Michael Lipsky [31] observait que les changements résultaient plus souvent des gestes quotidiens posés sur le terrain par les fonctionnaires ou les acteurs de la périphérie que des grands objectifs fixés par les grands centres de décision. Nous pensons, nous aussi, avec le professeur français, qu’il ne sert à rien en effet de développer des objectifs ambitieux si on ne peut valablement les traduire en contenu d’action. Autrement dit, c’est moins la formulation des grands programmes qui compte que la détermination des processus à travers lesquels une décision verra ou non le jour et prendra corps [32]. Certes, cela ne s’improvise pas. Un soin particulier doit être consacré à la mise en œuvre sérieuse des objectifs que l’on s’assigne. Construire des policies, c’est – nous l’avons un peu trop oublié en Wallonie ces dernières décennies – articuler avec soin les grandes orientations stratégiques avec la réalité concrète du travail de terrain et y mobiliser la diversité des acteurs qui y règnent [33]. C’est là qu’il s’agit de mettre, en usant de tout son pragmatisme, de l’ordre dans le désordre, pour reprendre la belle formule de Philippe Zittoun [34].

Deux premières initiatives ont d’ailleurs été prises en ce sens. La première fut de transformer, dans une initiative conjointe prise en novembre 2017, une formation-action à la prospective organisée avec la DGO5 du Service public de Wallonie Pouvoirs locaux et Action sociale, en véritable laboratoire de construction par ces fonctionnaires de leurs métiers de demain. La seconde initiative fut, début février 2018, de préparer le panel citoyen « Investir dans les jeunes » organisé à l’initiative du Parlement de Wallonie, par un Policy Lab réunissant des jeunes, afin d’identifier des enjeux de long terme. Dans les deux cas, il s’agissait pour les participants d’être rapides, intellectuellement mobiles, efficaces, proactifs, vifs, opérationnels. Et ce fut le cas. Nous y reviendrons…

Le Wallonia Policy Lab correspond bien à ce moment de notre histoire : celui où l’on passe des grands principes idéologiques à celui de l’expérimentation – au sol – de nouvelles actions collectives et concrètes, en vue de leur mise en application. Cette manière de travailler nous permettra de surmonter, enfin, nos travers endémiques, nos blocages structurels ainsi que nos inerties mentales et culturelles, afin de répondre véritablement aux enjeux qui sont les nôtres. Ce moment où, enfin, on doit se redresser.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

 

[1] Voir par exemple la définition de Policy / Politique dans le programme MEANS : ensemble d’activités différentes (programmes, procédures, lois, règlements) qui sont dirigées vers un même but, un même objectif général. Evaluer les programmes socio-économiques, Glossaire de 300 concepts et termes techniques, coll. MEANS, vol. 6., p. 33, Commission européenne, Fonds structurels communautaires, 1999. – Mes remerciements à mes collègues Pascale Van Doren et Michaël Van Cutsem de m’avoir aidé à nourrir et affiner ce texte.

[2] Philippe ZITTOUN, La fabrique politique des politiques publiques, Une approche pragmatique de l’action publique, p. 10sv, Paris, Presses de Sciences Po, 2013. – Thierry BALZACQ e.a., Fondements de Science politique, p. 33, Louvain-la-Neuve, De Boeck, 2015. – Voir la large mise en discussion du concept de policy dans Michaël HILL & Frederic VARONE, The Public Policy Process, p. 16-23, New York & London, Routledge, 7e ed., 2017.

[3] A course or principle of action adopted or proposed by an organisation or individual. Oxford English Dictionary on line.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/policy (2 avril 2018).

[4] Edward C. PAGE, The Origins of Policy, in Michael MORAN, Martin REIN & Robert E. GOODIN, Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, p. 210sv, Oxford University Press, 2006. – Brian W. HOGWOOD & Lewis A. GUNN, Policy Analysis for the Real World, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1984.

[5] Voir le blog de la London School of Economics and Political Science : http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/

[6] Harold Dwight LASSWELL, A Pre-View of Policy Sciences, New York, American Elsevier, 1971.

[7] Aaron WILDAVSKY, Speaking Truth to Power, The Art and Craft of Policy Analysis, Boston, Little Brown, 1979.

[8] Joint Services Command and Staff College (JSCSC), maintenant enseignant au King’s Collège à Londres.

[9] William H. PARK, Policy, 4, in Jay M. SHAFRITZ Jr. ed., Defining Public Administration, Selections from the International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration, New York, Routledge, 2018.

[10] M. HILL & F. VARONE, The Public Policy Process…, p. 20. – Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 35, Paris, Lextenso, 2010.

[11] We note that policy approaches tend toward contextuality in place of fragmentation and toward problem-oriented not problem-blind perspectives. H. D. LASSWELL, A Pre-View of Policy Sciences…, p. 8.

[12] Oxford Handbook of Public Policy…, p. 6.

[13] Yehezkel DROR, Training for Policy Makers, in Handbook…, p. 82-86.

[14] Ibidem, p. 86sv.

[15] Edward C. PAGE, Policy without Policians, Bureaucratic Influence in Comparative Perspective, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2012.

[16] Philippe DESTATTE, L’élaboration d’un nouveau contrat social, dans Philippe DESTATTE dir., Mission prospective Wallonie 21, La Wallonie à l’écoute de la prospective, Premier Rapport au Ministre-Président du Gouvernement wallon, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 2003. 21 http://www.wallonie-en-ligne.net/Wallonie_Prospective/Mission-Prosp_W21/Rapport-2002/3-2_nouveau-contrat-social.htm – Steven A. ROSELL e.a., Governing in an Information Society, p. 21, Montréal, Institute for Research on Public Policy, 1992.

[17] Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 77, Paris, Lextenso, 2010.

[18] Thus, it demands that we consider all the actors and locations beyond the « core executive » involved in the policy making process. David RICHARDS & Martin J. SMITH, Governance and Public Policy in the UK, p. 2, Oxford University Press, 2002.

[19] P. DURAN, Penser l’action publique…, p. 76-77.

[20] Ph. DESTATTE, Bonne gouvernance : contractualisation, évaluation et prospective, Trois atouts pour une excellence régionale, dans Ph. DESTATTE dir., Evaluation, prospective et développement régional, p. 7sv, Charleroi, Institut-Destrée, 2001.

[21] Ph. DESTATTE, Plus de démocratie et un meilleur développement, Rapport général du quatrième Congrès La Wallonie au futur, dans La Wallonie au futur, Sortir du XXème siècle : évaluation, innovation, prospective, p. 436, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 1999.

[22] Philippe MOREAU DEFARGES, La gouvernance, p. 33, Paris, PuF, 2003.

[23] Gilles PAQUET, Gouvernance : mode d’emploi, Montréal, Liber, 2008.

[24] Policy analysts use the imperfect tools of their trade not only to assist legitimately elected officials in implementing their democratic mandates, but also to empower some groups rather than others. Oxford Handbook of Public Policy…, p. 28.

[25] Behavioural Insights is an inductive approach to policy making that combines insights from psychology, cognitive science, and social science with empirically-tested results to discover how humans actually make choices. Since 2013, OECD has been at the forefront of supporting public institutions who are applying behavioural insights to improving public policy. http://www.oecd.org/gov/regulatory-policy/behavioural-insights.htm

[26] Voir par exemple Paola COLETTI, Evidence for Public Policy Design, How to Learn from Best Practice, Palgrave Macmillan, New York – Houndmills Basingstoke UK, 2013.

[27] EU Policy Lab, a collaborative and experimental space for innovative policy-making, Brussels; European Commission, Joint Research Centre, 2017.

[28]  www.institut-destree.org/Certificat_Prospective_operationnelle

[29] Philippe DESTATTE, Qu’est-ce qu’un gouvernement ouvert ?, Blog PhD2050, Reims, 7 novembre 2017,

https://phd2050.org/2017/11/09/opengov-fr/

[30] Sur l’identification des enjeux : Charles E. LINDBLOM, Policy-making Process, p. 12-14, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice-Hall, 1968.

[31] Michael LIPSKY, Street Level Bureaucracy, New York, Russel Sage, 1980.

[32] Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 48, Paris, Lextenso, 2010.

[33] Jeffrey L. PRESSMAN & Aaron WILDAWSKY, Implementation, Berkeley CA, University of California Press, 1973. – Susan BARRETT & Colin FUDGE eds, Policy and Action, Essays on the Implementation of Public Policy, London, Methuen, 1981.

[34] Ph. ZITTOUN, op.cit., p. 326.

Namur, Parlement de Wallonie, le 3 mars 2018

Le 20 janvier 2018, lors de l’émission RTBF radio Le Grand Oral, Béatrice Delvaux et Jean-Pierre Jacquemin interrogeaient le directeur de la Fondation pour les Générations futures, Benoît Derenne, concernant la conférence-consensus portant sur certaines questions du Pacte d’excellence de la Communauté française. Évoquant les exercices délibératifs citoyens comme celui qu’entame le Parlement de Wallonie le 3 mars 2018 [1], les deux journalistes parlaient d’une forme de récupération, de naïveté, ou même d’un alibi du politique.

Ma conviction est radicalement différente. Je pense, tout au contraire de ces commentateurs, que la redéfinition d’une relation fondamentale de confiance entre les élus, organisés en assemblée, et les citoyens invités à y siéger en parallèle, est non seulement nécessaire, mais aussi qu’elle est salutaire et qu’elle demande des efforts considérables.

La redéfinition d’une relation fondamentale de confiance entre les élus et les citoyens

Elle est nécessaire, car cette confiance est rompue. Elle s’est délitée progressivement avec l’ensemble des institutions au fur et à mesure que le citoyen s’éduquait, se formait, comprenait mieux l’environnement politique, économique et social dans lequel il évolue. La démocratisation des études, la radio et la télévision, l’internet, les réseaux sociaux, sont autant de vecteurs qui, dans les cinquante dernières années ont progressivement encapacité de plus en plus de citoyens, leur ont permis de mieux comprendre le monde, ses acteurs et ses facteurs, et par là, d’exiger des institutions une ouverture, un dialogue, une éthique de nature nouvelle. Depuis les années 1970, toutes les institutions ont été mises en cause profondément, parfois violemment, parce qu’elles n’avaient pas pu évoluer : l’école, la gendarmerie, la justice, les médias, l’administration, les institutions politiques, de la monarchie à la commune, en passant par tous les gouvernements et tous les parlements. L’Europe et le monde n’ont d’ailleurs pas échappé à cette évolution et tentent d’ailleurs de réagir fortement par des initiatives nouvelles comme l’European Policy Lab, les travaux sur l’avenir du Gouvernement (The Future of Government) ou le Partenariat pour une Gouvernement ouvert qui regroupe désormais plus de 70 pays [2]. Dès lors, je pense que la rupture de cette confiance représente à terme un danger de mort pour notre démocratie, car les citoyens cessent d’y investir. Et, comme le craignait Raymond Aron : lorsque manquent la discipline et la sagesse des citoyens, les démocraties sauvent peut-être la douceur de vivre, mais elles cessent de garantir le destin de la patrie [3].

Elle est salutaire, car cette confiance peut être renouée. Dans leur très grande majorité, les citoyennes et les citoyens ne sont pas des anarchistes. Ils ne veulent pas vivre sans État, sans institutions, sans règles. Ce sont des pragmatiques qui recherchent du sens dans le monde et ses composantes pour pouvoir s’y inscrire pleinement en articulant des aspirations collectives, sociétales, et des désirs personnels, des besoins familiaux. Depuis les années 1980, les institutions et les politiques ont tenté de répondre à leur mise en cause. À chaque « affaire » qui s’est déclenchée, à chaque mise en cause fondamentale, a répondu un effort d’objectivation, de compréhension et de remédiation. Et les Parlements ont été en première ligne, avec d’abord les commissions d’enquête (Heysel, Jos Wyninckx, Brabant wallon, Cools, Dutroux, Publifin, etc.), des recommandations et leur mise en œuvre législatives (loi Luc D’Hoore sur le financement des partis politiques, etc.) ou exécutives (suppression de la gendarmerie, procédures Franchimont, etc.) [4].

Le rétablissement de cette confiance demande des efforts considérables de recherche, d’expérimentation, de stabilisation. Je peux témoigner de cette préoccupation pour les institutions wallonnes pour avoir eu l’occasion de m’en soucier dans la durée, déjà avec Guy Spitaels, lorsqu’il présidait le Parlement de Wallonie de 1995 à 1997, ensuite avec Robert Collignon (2000-2004), Emily Hoyos (2009-2012), Patrick Dupriez (2012-2014) et aujourd’hui avec André Antoine et le Bureau du Parlement, pour qui nous avons suivi les travaux de la Commission de rénovation démocratique en 2014 et 2015, avant de réaliser, avec le politologue Christian de Visscher, le rapport qui a servi de base au colloque du 17 novembre 2015 sur Les ressorts d’une démocratie wallonne renouvelée, dans le cadre du 35e anniversaire des lois d’août 1980 et du 20e anniversaire de l’élection directe et séparée des parlementaires wallons [5]. Pour ce qui nous concerne, le passage à l’acte de ces réflexions a été l’organisation du panel citoyen sur les enjeux de la gestion du vieillissement, suivant une méthodologie que nous avions déjà inaugurée en Wallonie en 1994 avec Pascale Van Doren et Marie-Anne Delahaut, et l’appui des professeurs Michel Quévit et Gilbert de Landsheere [6].

Ainsi, la question elle-même de la participation des citoyens n’est-elle pas neuve au Parlement de Wallonie. Lors de sa séance du 16 juin 1976 déjà, le Conseil régional wallon adopta une résolution en référence à une proposition du sénateur Jacques Cerf, un élu Rassemblement wallon de Lehal-Trahegnies, dans la circonscription de Charleroi-Thuin, qui fut vice-président de l’Assemblée, – le Conseil régional était alors uniquement composé de sénateurs – portant sur la création de commissions permanentes de participation dans les communes et l’obligation d’informer les citoyens sur la gestion communale [7].

S’il n’est pas nouveau ni limité au niveau régional, cet enjeu de relations avec les citoyennes et citoyens n’est pas non plus propre à la Wallonie ni à la Belgique. L’absence de consultation des citoyens entre les élections est une des critiques majeures adressées aux institutions avec l’insuffisance du contrôle parlementaire sur les décisions politiques monopolisées par le pouvoir exécutif, pour citer Luc Rouban, directeur de recherche au CNRS, évoquant la situation française et s’interrogeant pour savoir si la démocratie représentative est en crise [8].

Et c’est ici que nous répondons à tous les sceptiques, parmi les journalistes, chroniqueurs ou même les élues et les élus qui n’ont pas toujours pris conscience de la nécessité d’une refondation démocratique, qui puisse à la fois répondre à un besoin de démocratie approfondie, et infléchir ou même renouveler les politiques collectives entre les échéances électorales. Il s’agit bien là d’instaurer une démocratie permanente, continue, horizontale, ou même une démocratie intelligente, pour reprendre la belle formule de mon regretté ami l’Ambassadeur Kimon Valaskakis, ancien président du Club d’Athènes, qui était venu, en 2010, faire une belle conférence pour le Parlement de Wallonie. Une démocratie, qui, comme le dit également Luc Rouban, ressemble davantage au profil citoyen, qui soit moins oligarchique, c’est-à-dire qui échappe à l’accaparement du pouvoir politique par une minorité qui défende ou cherche à satisfaire des intérêts privatifs (prend des distances avec la professionnalisation de la vie politique, échappe aux conflits d’intérêts, à la corruption, à la soumission aux groupes de pression, à l’influence parfois étouffante des Cabinets ministériels, etc.) [9]. Une démocratie également qui s’inscrive dans l’imputabilité, le rendre compte au contribuable, qui désacralise le politique – le pouvoir politique a désormais perdu toute transcendance, rappelait le sociologue Patrice Duran [10] -, tout en respectant l’élu pour son implication et la qualité de son travail au service de la collectivité, du bien commun, de l’intérêt général.

Si nous voulons résoudre les problèmes, il nous faut les maîtriser

Mais ce travail de refondation est extrêmement difficile et délicat. Il implique de ne pas mettre en cause un des fondements de la démocratie représentative, qui est la légitimité démocratique de l’élu. De même, il nécessite de renforcer la capacité des citoyens à dialoguer et à identifier les enjeux pour les prendre en charge non pas en fonction de leurs seuls intérêts, mais, eux aussi, de se placer au niveau collectif pour proposer des politiques communes, collectives, notamment publiques. J’insiste sur cette distinction, car, contrairement à ce que soutenait dernièrement un ministre communautaire, toutes les politiques publiques ne sont pas collectives. Une politique collective peut et devrait même, dans une logique de gouvernance par les acteurs, impliquer des moyens privés, associatifs et/ou citoyens. Reconnaissons que c’est rarement le cas.

Ainsi, prenons bien conscience que, pas plus que l’élu, le citoyen ne peut s’improviser gestionnaire public du jour au lendemain. Comme le souligne encore Luc Rouban dans son rapport publié à la Documentation française, la fragmentation de l’espace public et la complexité des procédures de décision ont rendu la démocratie incompréhensible à un nombre croissant de citoyens. L’ingénierie institutionnelle ne pourra pas résoudre ce problème qui appelle en revanche une véritable formation civique [11].

De même, la tâche difficile qui consiste à énoncer des politiques publiques ne s’improvise pas. La mise en forme de cet énoncé, que le politologue Philippe Zittoun désigne comme l’ensemble des discours, idées, analyses, catégories qui se stabilise autour d’une politique publique particulière et qui lui donne du sens, est ardue. En effet le travail de proposition d’action publique s’appuie sur un double processus : à la fois de greffe de cette proposition à un problème qu’elle permet de résoudre et de relation à une politique publique qu’elle voudrait transformer [12]. Tant le problème, que sa solution potentielle, que la politique publique à modifier doivent être connus et appropriés.

Les termes d’une équation comme celle-là doivent nous inviter à la modestie, sans jamais, toutefois, renoncer à cette ambition. Personne ne s’étonnera qu’ici je rappelle que, dans son souci de favoriser la bonne gouvernance démocratique, l’Institut Destrée, que j’ai l’honneur de piloter, définit la citoyenneté comme intelligence, émancipation personnelle et responsabilité à l’égard de la collectivité. De même, ce think tank inscrit-il parmi ses trois objectifs fondamentaux la compréhension critique par les citoyens des enjeux et des finalités de la société, du local au global, ainsi que la définition des axes stratégiques pour y répondre [13]. Dit plus simplement : si nous voulons résoudre les problèmes, il nous faut les maîtriser.

Investir dans les jeunes en matière d’emploi, de formation, de mobilité, de logement, de capacité internationale, en étant attentif au développement durable

La jeunesse n’est pas un âge de la vie, répétait le Général Douglas MacArthur, c’est un état d’esprit. Propos d’un homme de soixante ans, certes, et que je reprends volontiers à ma charge. Historiens, sociologues, psychologues et statisticiens se sont affrontés sans merci sur une définition de la jeunesse, qui est évidemment très relative selon l’époque de l’histoire, la civilisation, le sexe, etc. Parmi une multitude d’approches, on peut, avec Gérard Maurer, cumuler deux regards : le premier consiste à collecter les événements biographiques qui, comme autant de repères, marquent la sortie de l’enfance puis l’entrée dans l’âge adulte : décohabitation, sortie du système scolaire, accès à un emploi stable, formation d’un couple stable, sanctionné par le mariage ou non. La seconde approche, qui peut inclure la première, consiste à prendre en compte les processus temporels qui mènent de l’école à la vie professionnelle, de la famille d’origine à la famille conjugale, donc un double processus d’accès au marché du travail et au marché matrimonial, qui se clôture avec la stabilisation d’une position professionnelle et matrimoniale, pour parler comme le sociologue, mais en vous épargnant toutes les précautions d’usage [14]. De son côté, le professeur Jean-François Guillaume de l’Université de Liège, membre du Comité scientifique mis en place par le Parlement de Wallonie, intègre dans sa définition une dimension de volontarisme qui ne saurait déplaire au prospectiviste : la jeunesse contemporaine est généralement comprise comme une période où se profilent et se préparent les engagements de la vie adulte. Âge où les rêves peuvent s’exprimer et les projets prendre forme. Âge aussi où il faut faire des choix. Celui d’une formation ouverte sur l’insertion professionnelle n’est pas le moindre, car d’elle dépendent souvent encore l’indépendance résidentielle et l’engagement dans une relation conjugale [15].

À noter que, conscients de toutes ces difficultés de définition, et dans un souci de simplicité et devant la nécessité de définir le sujet tant pour l’approche statistique que pour l’analyse audiovisuelle qualitative, nous avons, avec le Parlement, décidé de cibler la tranche d’âge 18-29 ans, correspondant à la définition de l’INSEE, en l’arrondissant à 30 ans et en nous permettant de la souplesse dans l’application.

Chacun mesure dès lors la difficulté d’appréhender sur un sujet instable, en quelques jours, autant de problématiques aussi complexes (tissées ensemble dirait mon collègue Fabien Moustard, avec Edgar Morin) que l’emploi, la formation, la mobilité, le logement, la capacité internationale, en y intégrant l’angle du développement durable. C’est pourquoi, fort de l’expérience du panel citoyen sur la gestion du vieillissement, qui avait été amené à consacrer beaucoup de temps à formuler, puis à hiérarchiser les enjeux de long terme, nous avons souhaité préparer le processus de travail du panel citoyen Jeunes lors d’un séminaire dédié (Wallonia Policy Lab) qui s’est tenu le 3 février dernier autour d’une douzaine de jeunes volontaires. Sur base d’une mise en commun d’expériences personnelles, trois enjeux y ont été identifiés qui pourraient être plus particulièrement ciblés.

  1. Comment les acteurs, tant publics que privés, peuvent-ils mieux prendre en compte les besoins sociétaux émergents ?
  2. Comment remédier aux risques de précarisation et de dépendance des jeunes entre la sortie de l’enseignement obligatoire jusqu’au premier emploi soutenable ?
  3. Quelles sont les normes anciennes qui mériteraient d’être adaptées à nos façons de vivre actuelles, pour mieux répondre aux aspirations collectives et individuelles et ouvrir les nouvelles générations au monde ?

Ces enjeux constituent les portes d’entrée et la toile de fond pour aborder la problématique du panel. Celui-ci restera évidemment libre de se saisir ou non de la totalité ou d’une partie de ces questions.

Seule la contradiction permet de progresser

Ces enjeux systémiques sont des pistes à se réapproprier. Ou non, le panel restant souverain pour ces tâches. Il travaillera – c’est essentiel – comme a pu le faire celui de 2017 avec quatre principes de fonctionnement essentiels : (1) la courtoisie, pour cultiver la qualité d’une relation faite de bonne volonté constructive, d’écoute, d’empathie, de bienveillance, de dialogue respectueux des autres, d’élégance, d’amabilité et de politesse, (2) la robustesse, fondée sur l’ambition, la franchise, l’expérience davantage que l’idéologie, sur le pragmatisme, la solidité documentaire, la qualité du raisonnement, l’honnêteté, (3) l’efficacité par des interventions brèves, économes du temps et du stress de chacun, orientées vers le résultat, évitant la moralisation, enfin (4) la loyauté, le respect de l’engagement d’aboutir pris envers le Parlement et soucieux de la responsabilité qui nous est collective de porter l’expérience au bout de ses limites.

Comme nous l’avons dit lors du Policy Lab, en citant Jacques Ellul, il faut arriver à accepter que seule la contradiction permet de progresser. (…) La contradiction est la condition d’une communication [16].

L’essentiel, le fondement de l’intelligence collective est sans nul doute le fait de passer d’opinions personnelles largement fondées sur des représentations à une pensée commune coconstruite sur la connaissance des réalités. C’est à cette tâche que nous devons ensemble nous atteler pour chacun des problèmes envisagés.

En tout cas, pour tous ceux qui pensent qu’il vaut mieux réfléchir collectivement pour avancer ensemble.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

[1] Ce papier constitue la mise au net de l’intervention que j’ai faite lors de la séance de lancement du Panel citoyen « Jeunes » au Parlement de Wallonie, le 3 mars 2018.

[2] Voir Philippe DESTATTE, Qu’est-ce qu’un gouvernement ouvert ?, Blog PhD2050, Reims, 7 novembre 2017, https://phd2050.org/2017/11/09/opengov-fr/

[3] Raymond ARON, Face aux tyrannies, Juin 1941, dans R. ARON, Croire en la démocratie (1933-1944), p. 132, Paris, Fayard, 2017.

[4] voir Marnix BEYEN et Philippe DESTATTE, Nouvelle Histoire de Belgique, 1970-nos jours, Un autre pays, p. 67-117, Bruxelles, Le Cri, 2008.

[5] Philippe DESTATTE, Marie DEWEZ et Christian de VISSCHER, Les ressorts d’une démocratie renouvelée, Du Mouvement wallon à la Wallonie en Mouvement, Rapport au Parlement wallon, 12 novembre 2015.

https://www.parlement-wallonie.be/media/doc/pdf/colloques/17112015/ch-de-visscher_ph-destatte_m-dewez_democratie_wallonne_2015-11-12.pdf

[6] La Wallonie au Futur, Le Défi de l’Education, Conférence-consensus, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 1995.

[7] Jacques BRASSINNE, Le Conseil régional wallon, 1974-1977, p. 103, Namur, Institut Destrée, 2007.

[8] Luc ROUBAN, La démocratie représentative est-elle en crise ?, p. 7-8, Paris, La Documentation française, 2018.

[9] Ibidem, p. 10-11.

[10] Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 97, Paris, LGDJ, 2010.

[11] Luc ROUBAN, op. cit., p. 187.

[12] Philippe ZITTOUN, La fabrique politique des politiques publiques, p. 20, Paris, Presses de Sciences Po, 2013.

[13] Les Assemblées générales du 2 octobre 2004 et du 21 juin 2012 ont approuvé le projet de Charte de l’Institut Destrée, qui constitue l’article 17 des statuts de l’asbl : ww.institut-destree.org/Statuts_et_Charte

[14] Gérard MAURER, Ages et générations, p. 77sv, Paris, La Découvertes, 2015.

[15] Jean-François GUILLAUME, Histoire de jeunes, Des identités en construction, p. 8, Paris, L’Harmattan, 1998.

[16] Jacques ELLUL, La raison d’être, Méditation sur l’Ecclésiaste, Paris, Seuil, 1987.