archive

Archives de Tag: Suren Erkman

Munich, 1st November 2014

In a paper called The circular economy: producing more with less, published on my blog on 26 August 2014, I had the opportunity to offer a definition of the circular economy, to trace the concept’s progress internationally since the 1970s, and then to touch on the practices which, according to the French environmental agency ADEME in particular, underpin such an economy: eco-design, industrial ecology, the economy of functionality, re-use, repair, reutilisation and recycling [1]. Finally, I contended that, besides the key principles of sustainable development to which the circular economy contributes, to become part of this process meant supporting policies which, from the global to the local, become increasingly concrete as and when they get closer to companies. This is what I will try to show in this new presentation [2].

1. First industrial ecology and then the circular economy come on-stream

The circular economy, and especially industrial ecology, has been a reality for businesses, business parks, regions and cities for decades. The industrial symbiosis of Kalundborg (Symbiotic Industry), launched to the west of Copenhagen on the shores of the North Sea in 1961, is an international benchmark and recognised as a model for the development of eco-industrial parks [3]. Reference is also commonly made to the Dutch river and seaport of Mœrdijk (North Brabant), to Green Park business park in Berkshire in the UK, to the Grande-Synthe industrial area in Dunkirk, to the Artois-Flandres Industrial Estate in the North Pas de Calais, to the Reims-Bazancourt-Pomacle agribusiness park in Champagne-Ardenne, to Kamp C in Westerlo (near Antwerp) and other examples; in particular, practices by businesses such as pooled waste management and flow mapping are cited [4].

A circular ecosystem of economy

A Circular ecosystem of economy

http://www.symbiosis.dk/en/system

It was following a lengthy process of reflection that in late 2005 the European Commission proposed a new thematic waste prevention and recycling strategy that defined a long-term approach. Several proposals emanated from this strategy, including an overhaul of the Framework Directive on Waste [5]. The new directive pointed out that although European policy in this area was based primarily on the concept of a ‘waste hierarchy’, waste should above all be prevented from the product design stage onwards. In parallel, waste that cannot be avoided must be reutilised, recycled and recovered. The Commission accordingly regards landfill as ‘the worst option for the environment as it signifies a loss of resources and could turn into a future environmental liability’. The new directive announced the incorporation of the concept of life cycle into European legislation. It promotes, among other things, the idea of the circular economy, developed in China [6]. Meanwhile, since 2011, an initiative called A resource-efficient Europe is one of the seven flagship initiatives of the Europe 2020 Strategy. Among the measures recommended in the medium term to support this development, the European Commission advocates a strategy of transforming the Union into a circular economy, based on a recycling society with the aim of reducing waste generation and using waste as a resource [7]. The Commission also notes the significance of the work of the MacArthur Foundation, including the report presented in early 2014 at the World Economic Forum: Towards the Circular Economy: Accelerating the Scale-up across global supply chains [8].

2. The example of Wallonia: the economic development agencies create eco-parks

As part of the Wallonia Region’s strategy of supporting the redeployment and development of the economy, its Regional Policy Statement 2009-2014 stressed the government’s willingness to promote cooperation between small businesses, in particular via groupings of employers or the organisation of economic activities in a circular economy and to integrate and develop industrial ecology in the strategy of all stakeholders (e.g. regional and intermunicipal economic development agencies), to bring about a gradual optimisation of incoming and outgoing flows (energy, materials, waste, heat, etc.) between neighbouring businesses [9]. This commitment was implemented the following year in the priority plan of Wallonia, the so-called ‘Marshall 2.Green’. It is within this framework that the government launched a call for proposals to develop eco-industrial zones [10], with a budget of €2.5 million earmarked for the development of five pilot schemes. These projects were expected to bring together a facility operator and representatives of businesses from the economic activity zones (ZAEs) concerned, with the objective of promoting practical implementation in the area through equipment loans. Five sites were chosen on the basis of project quality:

– the Chimay Baileux industrial park which, in partnership with the Chimay Wartoise Foundation, wants to use malt residue from brewing in methane production in order to cogenerate heat and electricity for businesses that use them;

– Liège Science Park at Sart Tilman, where the intermunicipal agency SPI has brought together Level IT, Technifutur, Sirris, Physiol and Eurogentec around a project for renewable energy generation, biodiversity and soft mobility;

– the Ecopole of Farciennes-Aiseau-Presles near Charleroi, where intermunicipal agency Igretec is running a resource pooling project relating to the rehabilitation of a loop of the Sambre by bringing together companies such as Sedisol, Ecoterres and Recymex;

– the project organised at Hermalle-sous-Huy-Engis on the Meuse at Liège, optimising the logistics of road and river transport, where Knauf is already using gypsum waste from the company Prayon;

– The Tertre-Hautrage-Villerot industrial park, mainly devoted to chemicals and Seveso-classified, in which eight companies (Yara, Erachem, Advachem, Wos, Shanks, Euloco, Hainaut Tanking and Polyol) have joined forces with the regional economic development and spatial planning agency IDEA as well as with the city of Saint-Ghislain, near Mons on the French border [11].

The latter project, ranked first by the Region’s selection committee for its innovative character, has made it possible to develop industrial synergies involving the exchange of materials and energy, and in particular steam recovery, the rationalisation of water consumption, the creation of a closed system for the purification and re-use of waste water, the development of the railway on the site and the associated river dock, road safety around the park and aesthetic and environmental concerns [12]. A whole process is also gathering momentum at the initiative of Hainaut intermunicipal agency IDEA and the local companies concerned (YARA Tertre SA/NV, WOS, Shanks Hainaut, Erachem COMILOG, Polyol, Advachem, Hainaut-Tanking and Euloco). By introducing a local railway operator with the agreement of the Belgian infrastructure railway manager Infrabel, IDEA is attempting to meet the needs of industrial companies and minimise road use. The intermunicipal agency’s purpose is to meet the needs of its customers and hence to improve the situation of the affected companies to ensure that they retain their connection with the area and maintain as much activity as possible there. In addition, nearly 32 hectares of land shortly to be cleaned up by the regional public company SPAQuE [13] and the 8-hectare site of Yorkshire Europe, which has already been rehabilitated, represent real potential for the expansion of an industrial ecology project.

3. The NEXT Platform: a regional framework

In June 2013, in the presence of Ellen MacArthur and a hundred industrialists, the Wallonia Region formalised the cooperation agreement that its economy minister, Jean-Claude Marcourt, had signed with the foundation created by the British yachtswoman in the context of the Circular Economy 100 – Region process. This strategic partnership, with which Tractebel Engineering is associated, relates to the implementation of the circular ecology and is part of the development programme and industrial ecology platform called ‘NEXT’, set up the previous year by the authorities responsible for the regional economy. As Ellen MacArthur noted at the launch of this initiative, ‘the heart of the circular economy is innovation, creativity and opportunity’ [14].

Accordingly, in July 2013, the Government of Wallonia entrusted a mission to the Regional Investment Company of Wallonia (SRIW), and in particular its subsidiary BEFin, for the creation and implementation of the multisectoral circular economy strand of industrial policy in Wallonia (NEXT), complementing the competitiveness clusters. This programme’s role is to ensure the structured, comprehensive and coherent deployment of the circular economy in Wallonia in order to develop value-enhancing projects based on three pillars: industry, higher education and an international network. Besides raising companies’ awareness of the circular economy, as stated in the priority plan for Wallonia, the task of the unit that has been set up is to organise the creation of waste markets by companies and operators, to facilitate the introduction of a label for eco-systemic businesses and to foster partnerships with foreign institutions. It thus involves intensifying and structuring support for innovative circular economy projects driven by companies in Wallonia, from a perspective of sustainable materials management. It was then agreed that a circular economy fund should be set up at the Economic Stimulation Agency (ASE), and that an urgent mission focusing on giving guidance in recycling and re-using building materials should be entrusted to the GreenWin competitiveness cluster and the Construction Confederation. The missions of the ‘short circuits’ research centre were extended to include the circular economy on 26 September 2013 [15]. In early 2014, the NEXT team was particularly involved at the regional level but also at the area level with the preparation of European Structural Fund (ERDF) planning.

The Regional Policy Statement for Wallonia (DPR) 2014-2019 vigorously reaffirms the Paul Magnette government’s support for the development of the circular economy in Wallonia in order to promote the transition to a sustainable industrial system’ and to support the competitiveness of Walloon companies through synergies between them, promoting the reutilisation of waste as a new resource [16]. The DPR confirms the continuation of the NEXT programme and points out that the circular economy aims to ensure the emergence of innovative solutions to help decouple economic growth from increased consumption of resources, for example, by helping companies to rationalise their energy consumption and favouring the joint use of material and energy flows between businesses and the pooling of goods and services [17].

Conclusions: businesses, regions and cities as stages for action

The circular economy is an optimisation economy based on business parks, economic sectors, and local, regional or international industrial systems. It of course implies a sound knowledge of the regional industrial metabolism and metabolisms in specific areas [18], i.e. the flows generated by businesses, and their needs and constraints. The challenge for the business itself is likewise considerable, and the process of raising awareness among entrepreneurs about the benefits of the circular economy has also undergone a real acceleration [19]. As we have seen, the circular economy, rather than being a Copernican revolution or a paradigm shift, brings together practices that contribute to the transition to a more sustainable and harmonious society: eco-design, industrial ecology, the economy of functionality, re-use, repair, reutilisation and recycling.

These things make sense because they are or can be actually practised on the ground. Yet it is here that the results can seem difficult to achieve. As Suren Erkman noted, writing on industrial ecology, when it comes to going into the details of how to change manufacturing processes in order to make by-products and wastes usable by other plants, we come up against some serious technical and economic difficulties [20].

Experience on the ground, including in the Heart of Hainaut, has shown that the only tangible achievements are those based on the partnership of proximity between the players and the long-term relationship of trust between businesses and local operators. It is with reason that Professor Leo Dayan, senior lecturer at the Sorbonne, has since 2004 advocated the introduction of centres for the development of industrial links at area level and local business parks for the development of industrial ecology in practice. He could see small teams evolving on the ground that were highly skilled, flexible, functionally versatile and endowed with their own financial resources. It was their role, he argued, to identify local eco-links and spot wastage and inefficiencies in order to generate partnerships between businesses, including local universities. Dayan rightly attached great importance to encouraging the actors in order to develop the necessary synergies [21]. This is the approach that was taken by the intermunicipal agency IDEA at the Tertre-Hautrage-Villerot industrial park, out of a desire to reconcile economic competitiveness and environmental performance across such a site. The local partners and resources that are mobilised then make the difference: business clubs, local residents, municipal authorities, the Environmental Safety Commission but also the University of Mons and local research centres such as Multitel, specialising in telecommunications and material traceability.

The Business Federation of Wallonia (UWE)’s SMIGIN project has demonstrated that SMEs can also work on an industrial ecology and circular economy approach [22]. Here too though, as also in the application of the extended producer responsibility principle, promoted in France by the General Commission for Sustainable Development, the point is to work to change attitudes and the culture so that the principles of cooperation and exchange go beyond the conceptual stage to become a reality on the ground [23].

The circular economy is definitely a systemic tool that takes the form of multiple practices. Above all, though, it is a matter of businesses and specific areas, in other words people and entities brought together on a site that is by its very nature bounded and restricted. It is in this proximity, if not intimacy, that practical steps first begin to be taken, because concrete action is dependent on trust, which has to be patiently built up and carefully maintained.

 Philippe Destatte

https://twitter.com/PhD2050

[1] Philippe DESTATTE, The circular economy: producing more with less, Blog PhD2050, 26 August 2014, http://phd2050.org/2014/08/26/ce/

[2] This text is the background paper of a presentation named Creating Value in the Regenerative Transition given at The Future of Cities Forum, Imagine Regenerative Urban Development, organized by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the World Future Council and Energy Cities, Munich, Kulturhaus Milbertshofen, 30-31 october 2014.

[3] Dominique Bourg and Suren ERKMAN, Perspectives on Industrial Ecology, Sheffield, Greenleaf, 2003. – Fiona WOO e.a., Regenerative Urban Development: A roadmap to the city we need, Futures of Cities, A Forum for Regenerative Urban Development, p. 9-11, Hamburg, World Future Council, 2013. – A Circular Ecosystem of Economy, The Symbiosis Institute, http://www.symbiosis.dk/en/system (October 30, 2014).

[4] See Emmanuel SERUSIAUX ed., Le concept d’éco-zoning en Région wallonne de Belgique, Note de recherche n°17, Namur, Région wallonne – CPDT, April 2011, 42 p.

http://orbi.ulg.ac.be/bitstream/2268/90273/1/2011-04_CPDT_NDR-17_Ecozonings.pdf

[5] Waste management is regulated by the Framework Directive on Waste (2008/98/EC) and is based on the prevention, recycling and reutilisation of waste and on improving conditions for final disposal. Waste management is also addressed – in a more specific and sector-based manner – in numerous pieces of EU legislation: the Directive on Packaging and Packaging Waste (94/62/EC), the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive (2002/96/EC), the Directive on the Management of Waste from Extractive Industries (2006/21 / EC), and so on. http://ec.europa.eu/environment/waste/index.htm

[6] Taking sustainable use of resources forward: A Thematic Strategy on the prevention and recycling of waste, Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, Brussels, 21 December 2005, COM(2005) 666 final. – Politique de l’UE en matière de déchets : historique de la stratégie, EC, 2005. http://ec.europa.eu/environment/waste/pdf/story_book_fr.pdf

[7] A resource-efficient Europe – Flagship initiative under the Europe 2020 Strategy, Communication from Commission to the European Parliament and the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, Brussels, 26 January 2011 COM(2011) 21final, p. 7. – Note that the European Commission relies on the Online Resource Efficiency Platform (OREP) in connection with the circular economy.

http://ec.europa.eu/environment/resource_efficiency/index_en.htm

[8] Towards the Circular Economy: Accelerating the Scale-up across supply chains, prepared in collaboration with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and MacKinsey Company, World Economic Forum, January 2014.

[9] Déclaration de Politique régionale wallonne 2009-2014, Une énergie partagée pour une société durable, humaine et solidaire, Namur, Wallonia Government, July 2009. – The Rhones-Alpes Region has also launched such a call. See: Jean-Jack QUEYRANNE, Les Regions dans la démarche d’économie circulaire : un appel à projets pour soutenir cette démarche écologique industrielle et territoriale, in Annales des Mines, Responsabilité et envitonnement, 76, 2014/4, p. 64-67.

[10] An eco-industrial zone can be defined as ‘a zone of economic activity proactively managed by the association of companies on site, interacting positively with its neighbours, and in which spatial and urban planning measures, environmental management and industrial ecology combine to optimise the use of space, materials and energy, to support the performance and economic dynamism of both businesses and the host community and to reduce local environmental loads.’ E. SERUSIAUX ed., Le concept d’éco-zoning…, p. 17.

[11] Gérard GUILLAUME, La Wallonie a sélectionné cinq écozonings-pilotes, in L’Echo, 14 April 2011.

[12] IDEA : retour sur une expérience pilote de l’éco-zoning de Tertre-Hautrage-Villerot, Info-PME, 5 September 2013. www. info-pme.be – Le projet d’éco-zoning de Tertre-Hautrage-Villerot sélectionné par le Gouvernement wallon !, Mons, IDEA, Press release of 8 April 2011.

[13] SPAQuE is the regional consultancy firm reference on landfill rehabilitation, brownfields decontamination and environmental expertise in Wallonia: http://www.spaque.be/documents/ComProfen.pdf

[14] La Wallonie s’engage dans l’économie circulaire, La Wallonie s’engage dans l’économie circulaire, 13 June 2013. – NEXT : l’économie circulaire au cœur du processus de reconversion de l’économie wallonne, 18 July 2013. http://www.marcourt.wallonie.behttp://marcourt.wallonie.be/actualites/~next-l-economie-circulaire-au-coeur-du-processus-de-reconversion-de-l-economie-wallonne.htm?lng=fr

[15] Rapport de suivi Plan Marshall 2.vert, p. 231-235, SPW, Secrétariat général, Délégué spécial Politiques transversales, April 2014, p. 231.

[16] Wallonie 2014-2019, Oser, innover, rassembler, Namur, July 2014, 121 p. See especially pp. 5, 22, 24, 28, 83, 90.

[17] Ibidem, p. 71.

[18] The industrial metabolism is the entirety of the ‘biophysical components of the region’s industrial system’. Suren ERKMAN, Ecologie industrielle, métabolisme industriel et société d’utilisation, Geneva, Institut pour la Communication et l’Analyse des Sciences et des Technologies, 1994.

[19] See especially Rémy LE MOIGNE, L’économie circulaire, comment la mettre en œuvre dans l’entreprise grâce à la supply chain ?, Paris, Dunod, 2014.

[20] Suren ERKMAN, Vers une écologie industrielle, Comment mettre en pratique le développement durable dans une société hyper-industrielle, p. 37, Paris, Editions Charles Léopold Mayer, 2004.

[21] Léo DAYAN, Stratégies du développement industriel durable. L’écologie industrielle, une des clés de la durabilité, Document établi pour le 7ème programme-cadre de R&D (2006-2010) de la commission Européenne. Propositions pour développer l’écologie industrielle en Europe, p. 8, Paris, 2004. http://www.apreis.org/img/eco-indu/7emplanEurop.pdf

[22] The European SMIGIN (Sustainable Management by Interactive Governance and Industrial Networking) project enabled the UWE to organise between 2006 and 2009, collective solutions based on a common methodology for the common needs of companies in seven business parks in Belgium and France: the measurement of environmental impacts, landscaping, and the optimisation of transport, waste and energy flows. The UWE went on to create a ‘sustainable business parks’ unit. Inform, Ecologie industrielle et économie circulaire : la dimension environnementale 2.0, Business & Society Belgium, 2012.

[23] Entreprises et parcs d’activités durables, Territoires et parcs durables, implication des entreprises : état des lieux et perspectives d’avenir, Matinée d’échanges, 4 April 2014, UWE, CPAD, 2014. 4 p.

Namur, August 26, 2014

It is Professor Paul Duvigneaud, whom I met on the occasion of a private viewing of paintings in a Brussels art gallery, to whom I am indebted, at the rather belated age of thirty, for a lesson on ecosystems, industrial ecology and the principles of what nowadays is referred to as the “circular economy”. Using as a basis the example of the old Solvay sedimentation tanks near Charleroi, a case I had submitted to him with the aim of provoking him on the subject of the preservation of natural resources [1], and the manufacturing process for soda, the author of La synthèse écologique (Ecological Synthesis) [2], suddenly made these ideas make sense in my mind. At the same time, in a clear explanation typical of a skilled teacher, he linked them up with my rudimentary knowledge of the concepts of biosphere and complex system that I had found out about some ten years earlier in the Telhardian thinking [3]. In this way, reflecting in terms of flows and stocks, Duvigneaud was already supplementing the cycle of carbon and oxygen, at the level of an industrial and urban area, with that of phosphorus and heavy metals. For their part, some years later (albeit still only in 1983), Gilles Billen, Francine Toussaint and a handful of other researchers from different disciplines showed how material moved around in the Belgian economy. By also taking energy flows and data exchanges into account, they, too, provided an additional new way of looking at industrial ecology and came up with specific avenues of research for modifications to be made to the system, such as short and long recycling [4].

Today, after a few rotations of the world as well as a few more decades of our biosphere and our local environment deteriorating, the circular economy is coming back in force.

1. What is the circular economy?

A circular economy is understood as being an economy that helps achieve the aims of sustainable development by devising processes and technologies such as to replace a so-called linear growth model – involving excessive consumption of resources (raw materials, energy, water, real estate) and excessive waste production – with a model of ecosystemic development that is parsimonious in its extraction of natural resources and is characterised by low levels of waste, but which results in equivalent or even increased performance [5].

The Foundation set up in 2010 by the British navigator Ellen MacArthur, an international reference in the field of the circular economy, clarifies that the circular economy is a generic term for an economy that is regenerative by design. Materials flows are of two types, biological materials, designed to reenter the biosphere, and technical materials, designed to circulate with minimal loss of quality, in turn entraining the shift towards an economy ultimately powered by renewable energy [6]. This is a system, as the founder and navigator indicated, in which things are made to be redone.[7].

Even though the concept of circular economy may seem very recent, we have seen that it is actually in consonance with an older tradition dating back to the 1970s with the development of systems analysis and awareness of the existence of the biosphere and ecosystems and what is known as the industrial metabolism. In a work published at the Charles Léopold Mayer Foundation, Suren Erkman defined this industrial metabolism as the study of all the biophysical component parts of the industrial system. For the director of the ICAST in Geneva, the aim of this essentially analytical and descriptive approach is to understand the dynamics of flows and stocks of materials and energy associated with human activities, from extraction and production of the resources through to their inevitable return, sooner or later, in biochemical processes [8]. In a brief historical overview and inventory of schools of thought linked to the model of the circular economy [9], the MacArthur Foundation also recalls other sources such as the Regenerating Design of architect John Tillman Lyle (1934-1998), professor at the California State Polytechnic University of Pomona [10], the works of his fellow designer William McDonough with the German chemist Michael Braungart on eco-efficiency and the so-called Cradle to cradle (C2C) certification process [11], those of the Swiss economist and member of the Club of Rome Walter R. Stahel, author of research on the dematerialisation of the economy [12], those of Roland Clift, professor of Environmental Technology at the University of Surrey (UK) and president of the International Society for Industrial Ecology [13], the works of the American consultant Janine M. Benyus, professor at the University of Montana, known for her research on bio-mimicry [14], and the written works of the businessman of Belgian origin Günter Pauli, former assistant to the founder of Club of Rome Aurelio Peccei and himself author of the report The Blue Economy [15]. Many other figures could be cited, who may perhaps be less well-known in the Anglo-Saxon world but are by no means any less pioneering in the field. I am thinking here of Professor Paul Duvigneaud, to whom I have already referred.

2. The practices underpinning the circular economy

As noted in the study drafted by Richard Rouquet and Doris Nicklaus for the Sustainable Development Commission (CGCD) and published in January 2014, the objective of moving over to the circular economy is gradually to replace the use of virgin raw materials with the constant re-use of materials already in circulation [16]. These two researchers analysed the legislation and regulations governing implementation of the circular economy in Japan, Germany, the Netherlands and China, and demonstrate that, beyond the famous « three Rs » (reduction, re-use and recycling), this concept in fact leads to approaches and priorities that can sometimes differ considerably, in terms of nature and intensity, from one country to another. It could be added that within one and the same country or region, the way in which the circular economy is understood and interpreted varies very appreciably, meaning it can encompass a smaller or larger range of activities and processes.

Nonetheless, we can go along with the Agency for the Environment and the Harnessing of Energy (ADEME) when it includes seven practices in the circular economy [17].

Economie-circulaire_Dia-EN_2014-08-26

2.1. Ecodesign

Ecodesign is a strategic design management process that takes account of environmental impacts throughout the life cycle of packaging, products, processes, services, organisations and systems. It makes it possible to distinguish what falls under waste and what falls under value [18]. The good or service that has thus been eco-designed aims to fulfil a function and meet a need with the best possible eco-efficiency, i.e. by making efficient use of resources and reducing environmental and health impacts to a minimum [19].

2.2. Industrial ecology

Broadly speaking, industrial ecology can be defined as an endeavour to determine the transformations liable to make the industrial system compatible with a “normal” functioning of the biological ecosystems [20]. Pragmatically and operatively speaking, the ADEME defines it as a means of industrial organisation that responds to a collective logic of mutualisation, synergies and exchanges, is set in place by several economic operators at the level of an area or a region, and is characterised by optimised management of resources (raw materials, waste, energy and services) and a reduction of the circuits [21]. Industrial ecology is based first and foremost on the industrial metabolism, i.e. the analysis of the materials flows and energy flows associated with any activity.

2.3. The economy of functionality

As ATEMIS points out, the Economy of Functionality model meets the demand for new forms of productivity based on efficiency of use and regional efficiency of products. It consists in producing an integrated solution for goods and services, based on the sale of an efficiency of use and/or a regional efficiency, making it possible to take account of external social and environmental factors and to enhance the value of intangible investments in an economy henceforth driven by the service sector [22]. The economy of functionality therefore favours use over possession and, as the ADEME says, tends to sell services connected with the products rather than the products themselves.

2.4. Re-use

Re-use is the operation by which a product is given or sold by its initial owner to a third party who, in principle, will give it a second life[23]. Re-use makes it possible to extend the product’s life when it no longer meets the first consumer’s requirements, by putting it back into circulation in the economy, for example in the form of a second-hand product. Exchange and barter activities are part and parcel of this process. Re-use is not a method for waste processing or conversion, but one of the ways of preventing waste.

2.5. Repair

 This involves making damaged products or products that are no longer working fit for use again or putting them back into working order, in order to give them a second life. In fact, these processes run counter to the logic of disposable items or planned obsolescence.

2.6. Reutilisation

Reutilisation implies waste being dealt with in such way as to have all of it or separate parts of it brought into a different circuit or economic sector or business, with a qualitative choice and the aim for sustainability [24]. The development of the resource centres in the framework of the social and solidarity-based economy plays a part in this.

2.7. Recycling

As highlighted by the ADEME, recycling consists in a reutilisation of raw materials stemming from waste, in a closed loop for similar products, or in an open loop for use in other types of goods [25].

 

3. Policies that go from the global to the local but become increasingly concrete as and when they get closer to companies

The inclusion of the circular economy as one of the aims of sustainable development meets a special requirement. Indeed, the Brundtland Report, Our Common Future (1987), had drawn attention, in its Chapter 8, Industry: Producing more with less, to the fact that if industry takes materials out of the patrimony of natural resources and at the same time introduces products and pollution into the human being’s environment. In general, industries and industrial operations should be encouraged that are more efficient in terms of resource use, that generate less pollution and waste, that are based on the use of renewable rather than non renewable resources, and that minimize irreversible adverse impacts on human health and the environment. (…) To sustain production momentum on a global level, therefore, policies that inject resource efficiency considerations into economic, trade, and other related policy domains are urgently needed, particularly in industrial countries, along with strict observance of environmental norms, regulations, and standards. The Report recommends that the authorities and the industries include resource and environmental considerations must be integrated into the industrial planning and decision-making processes of government and industry. This will allow, writes the Norwegian Prime Minister, a steady reduction in the energy and resource content of future growth by increasing the efficiency of resource use, reducing waste, and encouraging resource recovery and recycling [26].

A major tool serving sustainable development, the industrial ecology model is also, as Christian du Tertre points out, the model of the circular economy, which innovates in the field of regional governance: it is not only an entrepreneurial model, but is also interested in transforming relations between players in a particular region. Its circular nature implies the mutualisation among different players of certain investors and resources, both tangible and intangible. For the economics professor at the Université Paris-Diderot, inter-industrial relations are no longer solely a matter of a traditional trade relationship, but concern a long-term partnership that can lead to the establishment of a collective intangible patrimony: sharing of skills, of research centres, of intangible investments, etc. [27]

The circular economy thus appears to be a major line of development with a global-to-local structure and underpinning systemic and cross-disciplinary policies pursued at European, national/federal, regional and divisional level. These policies are intended to fit together and link up with each other, becoming more and more concrete as and when they get closer to the officers in the field, and therefore companies.

This is what I will be expounding in a subsequent paper.

Philippe Destatte

https://twitter.com/PhD2050

[1] Paul DUVIGNEAUD et Martin TANGUE, Des ressources naturelles à préserver, dans Hervé HASQUIN dir., La Wallonie, le pays et les Hommes, Histoire, Economies, Sociétés, vol. 2, p. 471-495, Bruxelles, La Renaissance du Livre, 1980.

[2] Voir Paul DUVIGNEAUD, La synthèse écologique, Populations, communautés, écosystèmes, biosphère, noosphère, Paris, Doin, 2e éd., 1980. (La première édition intitulée Ecosystèmes et biosphère has been published in 1962 by the Belgian Ministery of Education and Culture.) – Gilles BILLEN e.a., L’Ecosystème Belgique, Essai d’écologie industrielle, Bruxelles, CRISP, 1983.

[3] Pierre TEILHARD de CHARDIN, L’homme et l’univers, p. 57-58, Paris, Seuil, 1956.

[4] Gilles BILLEN e.a., L’Ecosystème Belgique…1983.

[5] Jean-Claude LEVY & Xiaohong FAN, L’économie circulaire : l’urgence écologique, Monde en transe, Chine en transit, Paris, Presses des Ponts et Chaussées, 2009. – Bibliographie du CRDD, Economie circulaire et déchets, Août 2013.

Cliquer pour accéder à Biblio_CRDD_Economie_circulaire-2.pdf

[6]http://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/Towards the Circular Economy, Economic and business rationale for an accelerated transition, Ellen MacArthur Foundation, Rethink the Futur, t. 1, 2013.

[7] Ellen MACARTHUR, Rethink the Future, L’Economie circulaire, Ellen MacArthur Foundation – YouTube, 4 octobre 2010.

[8] Suren ERKMAN, Vers une écologie industrielle, Comment mettre en pratique le développement durable dans une société hyper-industrielle ?, p. 12-13, Paris, Fondation Charles Léopold Mayer, 2e éd., 2004 (1998). – S. ERKMAN & Ramesh RAMASWAMY, Applied Industrial Ecology, A New Platform for Planning Sustainable Societies, Bangalore, Aicra Publishers, 2003.

[9] The Circular Model, Brief History and Schools of Thought, Ellen MacArthur Foundation, Rethink the Futur, 4 p., s.d. http://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/

[10] John T. LYLE, Regenerative Design for Sustainable Development, New York, John Wilmey & Sons, 1994.

http://www.csupomona.edu/~crs/

[11] William Mc DONOUGH & Michael BRAUNGART, The Next Industrial Revolution, in The Atlantic, October 1, 1998. http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1998/10/the-next-industrial-revolution/304695/ – W. McDONOUGH & M. BRAUNGART, Cradle to Cradle, Créer et recycler à l’infini, Paris, Editions alternatives, 4e éd., 2011.

[12] Walter R. STAHEL, The Performance Economy, London, Palgrave MacMillan, 2006.

[13] Roland CLIFT, Beyond the « Circular Economy », Stocks, Flows and Quality of Life, The Annual Roland Clift Lecture on Industrial Ecology, November 6, 2013.

[14] Janine M. BENUYS, Biomimicry, Innovation inspired by Nature, New York, William Morrow, 1997. – Biomimétisme, Quand la nature inspire les innovations durables, Paris, Rue de l’Echiquier, 2011.

[15] Gunter PAULI, The Blue Economy, 10 Years, 100 Innovations, 100 Million Jobs, Taos N.M., Paradigm, 2010.

[16] Richard ROUQUET et Doris NICKLAUS, Comparaison internationale des politiques publiques en matière d’économie circulaire, coll. Etudes et documents, n° 101, Commissariat général au Développement durable, Janvier 2014.

[17] Osons l’économie circulaire, dans C’est le moment d’agir, n° 59, ADEME, Octobre 2012, p. 7. – Smaïl AÏT-EL-HADJ et Vincent BOLY, Eco conception, conception et innovation, Les nouveaux défis de l’entreprise, Paris, L’Harmattan, 2013.

[18] Sharon PRENDEVILLE, Chris SANDERS, Jude SHERRY, Filipa COSTA, Circular Economy, Is it enough?, p. 2, Ecodesign Centre Wales, March 11, 2014. http://edcw.org//sites/default/files/resources/Circular%20Ecomomy-%20Is%20it%20enough.pdf

[19] Economie circulaire : bénéfices socio-économiques de l’éco-conception et de l’écologie industrielle, dans ADEME et vous, Stratégie et études, n° 33, 10 octobre 2012, p. 2.

[20] Suren ERKMAN, Vers une écologie industrielle…, p. 13.

[21] Osons l’économie circulaire…, p. 7. – Thomas E. GRAEDEL et Braden R. ALLENBY, Industrial Ecology, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice Hall, 1995.

[22] Atemis, Analyse du Travail et des Mutations de l’Industrie et des Services, 28 janvier 2014. – voir Christian du TERTRE, Economie de la fonctionnalité, développement durable et innovations institutionnelles, dans Edith HEURGON dir., Economie des services pour un développement durable, p. 142-255, Paris, L’Harmattan, 2007.

[23] Réemploi, réparation et réutilisation, Données 2012, Synthèse, p. 6, Angers, ADEME, 2013.

[24] The conservation of resources through more effective manufacturing processes, the reuse of materials as found in natural systems, a change in values from quantity to quality, and investing in natural capital, or restoring and sustaining natural resources. Paul HAWKEN, Amory LOVINS & L. Hunter LOVINS, Natural Capitalism, Creating the Next Industrial Revolution, Little, Brown & Cie, 1999.

[25] Ibidem.

[26] Gro Harlem BRUNDTLAND, Our Common Future, United Nations, 1987.

http://www.un-documents.net/ocf-08.htm

[27] Christian du TERTRE, L’économie de la fonctionnalité, pour un développement plus durable, Intervention aux journées de l’économie Produire autrement pour vivre mieux, p. 3, Paris, 8 novembre 2012. http///www.touteconomie.org/jeco/181_537.pdf

Namur, le 1er juin 2014

C’est au professeur Paul Duvigneaud, rencontré au gré d’un vernissage dans une galerie de peinture bruxelloise, que je dois, à l’âge tardif de trente ans, une leçon sur les écosystèmes, l’écologie industrielle ainsi que sur les principes de ce qu’on appelle aujourd’hui l’économie circulaire. Partant de l’exemple des anciens bassins de décantation Solvay près de Charleroi, cas que je lui avais soumis pour le provoquer sur la préservation des ressources naturelles [1], et du procédé de fabrication de la soude, l’auteur de La synthèse écologique [2], donnait soudainement chez moi du sens à ces idées. Du même coup, il les rattachait avec pédagogie à mes rudiments de connaissances des concepts de biosphère et de système complexe que j’avais découverts, une dizaine d’années auparavant, dans la pensée teihardienne [3]. Ainsi, réfléchissant en termes de flux et de stocks, Duvigneaud ajoutait déjà au cycle du carbone et de l’oxygène, à l’échelle d’un bassin industriel et urbain, celui du phosphore et des métaux lourds. De leur côté, quelques années plus tard – mais on n’était encore qu’en 1983 –, Gilles Billen, Francine Toussaint et une brochette d’autres chercheurs de disciplines différentes, montraient comment la matière circulait dans l’économie belge. Prenant eux aussi en compte les flux d’énergie et les échanges d’informations, ils apportaient un regard neuf complémentaire à l’écologie industrielle et des pistes concrètes de modifications du système, comme les recyclages court et long [4].

Aujourd’hui, après quelques tours du monde, ainsi que quelques nouvelles décennies de dégradation de notre biosphère et de notre environnement de proximité, l’économie circulaire revient en force.

1. Qu’est-ce que l’économie circulaire ?

On entend par économie circulaire, une économie qui contribue aux finalités du développement durable en élaborant des processus et des technologies tels qu’elle substitue à un modèle de croissance dit linéaire, trop consommateur de ressources (matières premières, énergie, eau, foncier) et trop producteur de déchets, un modèle de développement écosystémique, parcimonieux en prélèvements naturels, pauvre en résidus, mais à la performance équivalente voire accrue [5].

La Fondation créée en 2010 par la navigatrice britannique Ellen MacArthur, référence internationale en matière d’économie circulaire, précise que l‘économie circulaire est un terme générique pour une économie qui est réparatrice par nature. Les flux de matières sont de deux types, des matières biologiques, qui ont vocation à retourner à la biosphère, et des matières techniques, qui ont vocation à circuler avec une perte de qualité aussi faible que possible, tour à tour entraînant le changement vers une économie alimentée finalement par de l’énergie renouvelable [6]. C’est, ainsi que l’indiquait la fondatrice et navigatrice, un système où les choses sont faites pour être refaites [7].

Même si le concept d’économie circulaire apparaît très récent, il s’inscrit, nous l’avons vu, dans une tradition plus ancienne qui remonte aux années 1970 avec le développement de l’analyse des systèmes, la prise de conscience de l’existence de la biosphère et des écosystèmes ainsi que ce qu’on appelle le métabolisme industriel. Dans un ouvrage publié à la Fondation Charles Léopold Mayer, Suren Erkman définissait ce métabolisme industriel comme l’étude de l’ensemble des composants biophysiques du système industriel. Pour la directrice de l’ICAST à Genève, cette démarche, essentiellement analytique et descriptive, vise à comprendre la dynamique des flux et des stocks de matière et d’énergie liés aux activités humaines, depuis l’extraction et la production des ressources jusqu’à leur retour inévitable, tôt ou tard, dans les processus biogéchimiques [8]. Dans un bref historique et une recension des écoles de pensées liées au modèle de l’économie circulaire [9], la Fondation MacArthur évoque également d’autres sources comme le Regenerating Design de l’architecte John Tillman Lyle (1934-1998), professeur à la California State Polytechnic University de Pomona [10], les travaux de son collègue designer William McDonough avec le chimiste allemand Michael Braungart sur l’éco-efficacité et le processus de certification dit Cradle to cradle (C2C)[11], ceux de l’économiste suisse et membre du Club de Rome Walter R. Stahel, auteur de recherches sur la dématérialisation de l’économie [12], ceux de Roland Clift, professeur de Technologie environnementale à l’Université du Surrey (UK) et président de l’International Society for Industrial Ecology [13], les travaux de la consultante américaine Janine M. Benyus, professeur à l’Université du Montana, connue pour ses recherches sur le biomimétisme [14], ainsi que les écrits de l’homme d’affaires d’origine belge Günter Pauli, ancien assistant du fondateur du Club de Rome Aurelio Peccei et lui-même auteur du rapport L’économie bleue [15]. De nombreuses autres personnalités pourraient être citées, peut-être moins connues dans le monde anglo-saxon, mais certainement aussi précurseures. Je pense au professeur Paul Duvigneaud, déjà évoqué…

2. Les pratiques qui fondent l’économie circulaire

Comme le note l’étude rédigée par Richard Rouquet et Doris Nicklaus pour le Commissariat général au Développement durable (CGCD) et publiée en janvier 2014, l’objectif du passage à l’économie circulaire est de substituer progressivement l’utilisation des matières premières vierges par la réutilisation, en boucle, des matières déjà en circulation [16]. Ces deux chercheurs ont analysé les dispositifs législatifs et réglementaires de mise en œuvre de l’économie circulaire au Japon, en Allemagne, aux Pays-Bas ainsi qu’en Chine, et montrent que, au delà des fameux « trois r » (réduction, réutilisation, recyclage [17]), ce concept donne en fait lieu à des approches et à des priorités qui sont parfois très différentes en nature comme en intensité selon les pays. On pourrait ajouter qu’au sein même des pays et des régions, le sens que l’on attribue à l’économie circulaire est très varié et dès lors porte sur des activités et des processus plus ou moins étendus.

Néanmoins, on peut suivre l’Agence de l’Environnement et de la Maîtrise de l’Energie (ADEME) lorsque celle-ci intègre sept pratiques à l’économie circulaire [18].

Economie-circulaire_2014-06-01

2.1. L’éco-conception

L’éco-conception est un processus de gestion stratégique de la conception qui tient compte des impacts environnementaux tout au long du cycle de vie des emballages, des produits, des procédés, des services, des organisations et des systèmes. Il permet de distinguer ce qui relève des déchets et ce qui relève de la valeur [19]. Le bien ou le service ainsi écoconçu vise à remplir une fonction et à satisfaire un besoin avec la meilleure éco-efficience possible, c’est-à-dire en utilisant les ressources de façon efficace et en minimisant les impacts environnementaux et sanitaires [20].

2.2. L’écologie industrielle

De manière globale, on peut définir l’écologie industrielle comme un effort pour déterminer les transformations susceptibles de rendre le système industriel compatible avec un fonctionnement « normal » des écosystèmes biologiques [21]. De manière pragmatique et opératoire, l’ADEME la définit comme un mode d’organisation industrielle répondant à une logique collective de mutualisation, de synergies et d’échanges, mise en place par plusieurs opérateurs économiques à l’échelle d’une zone ou d’un territoire, et caractérisée par une gestion optimisée des ressources (matières premières, déchets, énergies et services) et une réduction des circuits [22]. L’écologie industrielle s’appuie en premier lieu sur le métabolisme industriel, c’est-à-dire l’analyse des flux de matières et d’énergie liés à toute activité.

2.3. L’économie de la fonctionnalité

Comme l’indique ATEMIS, le modèle de l’Economie de la Fonctionnalité répond à l’exigence de nouvelles formes de productivité fondées sur une performance d’usage et territoriale des productions. Il consiste à produire une solution intégrée de biens et de services, basée sur la vente d’une performance d’usage et/ou d’une performance territoriale, permettant de prendre en compte les externalités sociales et environnementales et de valoriser les investissements immatériels dans une économie désormais tirée par les services [23]. L’économie de la fonctionnalité privilégie donc l’usage sur la possession et, comme l’indique l’ADEME, tend à vendre des services liés aux produits plutôt que les produits eux-mêmes.

2.4. Le réemploi

Le réemploi est l’opération par laquelle un produit est donné ou vendu par son propriétaire initial à un tiers qui, a priori, lui donnera une seconde vie [24]. Le réemploi permet de prolonger la vie du produit lorsqu’il ne répond plus au besoin du premier consommateur en le remettant dans le circuit économique, par exemple sous la forme de produit de deuxième main. Les activités de troc s’inscrivent dans cette logique. Le réemploi n’est pas un mode de traitement, de transformation des déchets, mais une composante de leur prévention.

2.5. La réparation

Il s’agit de remettre en état d’usage ou en fonctionnement des produits abîmés ou en panne afin de leur donner une deuxième vie. Ces processus s’inscrivent en faux contre la logique des objets jetables ou de l’obsolescence programmée.

2.6. La réutilisation

La réutilisation est une intervention sur les déchets pour les introduire, entiers ou en pièces détachées, dans un autre circuit ou une autre filière économique, avec un choix qualitatif et une volonté de durabilité [25]. Le développement des ressourceries dans le cadre de l’économie sociale et solidaire y participe.

2.7. Le recyclage

Ainsi que le relève l’ADEME, le recyclage consiste en une réutilisation des matières premières issues des déchets, en boucle fermée pour les produits similaires, ou en boucle ouverte pour l’utilisation dans d’autres types de biens [26].

3. Des politiques qui vont du global au local mais deviennent de plus en plus concrètes au fur et à mesure qu’elles se rapprochent des entreprises

L’inscription de l’économie circulaire dans les finalités du développement durable répond à une demande spécifique. En effet, le Rapport Brundtland, Notre avenir à tous (1987) avait attiré l’attention, dans son chapitre 8, Produire plus avec moins, sur le fait que si l’industrie prélève des matériaux dans le patrimoine des ressources naturelles et introduit à la fois des produits et de la pollution dans l’environnement de l’être humain, il convient d’encourager celles des industries et activités industrielles qui sont les plus efficaces du point de vue de l’utilisation des ressources, qui engendrent le moins de pollution et de déchets, qui font appel à des ressources renouvelables plutôt qu’à celles qui ne le sont pas et qui réduisent au minimum les impacts négatifs irréversibles sur la santé des populations et sur l’environnement. Le Rapport préconise que les pouvoirs publics ainsi que les industries intègrent des considérations relatives aux ressources et à l’environnement dans leurs processus de planification industrielle et de prise de décisions. Cette intégration, écrit la Première ministre norvégienne, permettra de réduire graduellement la quantité d’énergie et de ressources nécessaires à la croissance future, en augmentant l’efficacité de l’utilisation des ressources, en diminuant la quantité de déchets et en favorisant la récupération et le recyclage des ressources [27].

Outil majeur au service du développement durable, le modèle de l’écologie industrielle est aussi, comme l’indique Christian du Tertre, celui de l’économie circulaire, qui innove sur le plan de la gouvernance territoriale : ce n’est pas seulement un modèle entrepreneurial, il s’intéresse aussi à la transformation des relations entre acteurs sur un territoire particulier. Son caractère circulaire implique la mutualisation entre différents acteurs de certains investisseurs et ressources, matériels comme immatériels. Pour le professeur d’économie à l’Université Paris-Diderot, les relations interindustrielles ne relèvent plus seulement d’une relation marchande classique, mais d’un partenariat de long terme pouvant conduire à la constitution d’un patrimoine immatériel collectif : partage de compétences, de centres de recherche, d’investissements immatériels[28]

Ainsi, l’économie circulaire apparaît-elle comme un axe de développement majeur qui s’articule du global au local et fonde des politiques, systémiques et transversales, qui se mènent tant aux niveaux européen, national/fédéral, régional et territorial. Ces politiques ont vocation à s’emboîter, s’articuler, en devenant de plus en plus concrètes au fur et à mesure qu’elles se rapprochent des agents de terrain, et donc des entreprises.

C’est ce que je montrerai dans un prochain papier.

Philippe Destatte

https://twitter.com/PhD2050

Autres ressources :

Ph. DESTATTE, Les entreprises et les territoires, berceaux de l’économie circulaire, Blog PhD2050, Namur, 25 juillet 2014.

Ph. DESTATTE, Quatre principes d’action pour concrétiser l’économie circulaire, Blog PhD2050, 22 janvier 2015.

[1] Paul DUVIGNEAUD et Martin TANGUE, Des ressources naturelles à préserver, dans Hervé HASQUIN dir., La Wallonie, le pays et les Hommes, Histoire, Economies, Sociétés, vol. 2, p. 471-495, Bruxelles, La Renaissance du Livre, 1980.

[2] Voir Paul DUVIGNEAUD, La synthèse écologique, Populations, communautés, écosystèmes, biosphère, noosphère, Paris, Doin, 2e éd., 1980. (La première édition intitulée Ecosystèmes et biosphère avait été publiée en 1962 par le Ministère de l’Education nationale et de la Culture de Belgique.) – Gilles BILLEN e.a., L’Ecosystème Belgique, Essai d’écologie industrielle, Bruxelles, CRISP, 1983.

[3] Par biosphère il faut entendre ici, non pas, comme le font à tort quelques-uns, la zone périphérique du globe où se trouve confinée la Vie, mais bien la pellicule de substance organique dont nous apparaît aujourd’hui enveloppée la Terre : couche vraiment structurelle de la planète, malgré sa minceur !… Ce qui est plus sûr, c’est que, dès les premiers débuts, l’écume protoplasmatique apparue à le surface du globe a dû manifester, en plus de sa « planétarité » l’autre caractère destiné à croître régulièrement en elle au cours des âges : je veux dire l’extrême inter-liaison des éléments formant sa masse encore informe et flottante. Car la complexité ne saurait se développer à l’intérieur de chaque corpuscule sans entraîner, corrélativement et de proche en proche un enchevêtrement de relations, un équilibre délicat et perpétuellement mobile, entre corpuscules voisins. De cette inter-complexité collective, extension naturelle et surcroît de l’intra-complexité propre à chaque particule, nous aurons à considérer plus loin, chez l’Homme, sous forme de « socialisation convergente », une expression singulière, terminale et unique…  Pierre TEILHARD de CHARDIN, L’homme et l’univers, p.57-58, Paris, Seuil, 1956.

[4] Gilles BILLEN e.a., L’Ecosystème Belgique…1983.

[5] La littérature fait souvent référence à la définition de Xiaohong FAN, tirée de sa thèse de doctorat à l’Université de Troyes, L’économie circulaire en Chine, 2008, p. 4 : l’économie circulaire est un système économique qui est apte à réintroduire dans le cycle de la production et de la consommation tous les déchets, sous-produits ou objets usés, qui redeviennent alors soit matières nouvelles, soit objets réutilisables sous forme ancienne réhabilitée, ou encore qui sont réinventés sous une nouvelle forme. Voir notamment Frédéric BOUCHARD, sur secondcycle.net, 2013. Jean-Claude LEVY, avec le concours de Xiaohong FAN, L’économie circulaire : l’urgence écologique, Monde en transe, Chine en transit, Paris, Presses des Ponts et Chaussées, 2009.

– Voir aussi la définition du Conseil économique, social et environnemental : le concept d’économie circulaire consiste à rechercher au maximum la réutilisation des sous-produits de chaque processus de production ou de consommation pour réintégrer ces derniers et éviter leur dégradation en déchets, en les considérant comme des ressources potentielles. Ce concept englobe la réduction de déchets en amont par l’éco-conception des produits, le remplacement de la vente de produits par la vente de services ou la location (économie de fonctionnalité), peu génératrices de déchets, le réemploi et enfin le recyclage. République française, Avis et rapports du Conseil économique et social, Avis présenté par Mme Michèle ATTAR, Enjeux de la gestion des déchets ménagers et assimilés en France, p. 77, Paris, CES, 2008. – On se référera par ailleurs à l’approche documentaire réalisée par le CRDD : Bibliographie du CRDD, Economie circulaire et déchets, Août 2013.

Cliquer pour accéder à Biblio_CRDD_Economie_circulaire-2.pdf

[6] The circular economy is a generic term for an economy that is regenerative by design. Materials flows are of two types, biological materials, designed to reenter the biosphere, and technical materials, designed to circulate with minimal loss of quality, in turn entraining the shift towards an economy ultimately powered by renewable energy. http://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/Towards the Circular Economy, Economic and business rationale for an accelerated transition, Ellen MacArthur Foundation, Rethink the Futur, t. 1, 2013.

[7] Ellen MACARTHUR, Rethink the Future, L’Economie circulaire, Ellen MacArthur Foundation – YouTube, 4 octobre 2010.

[8] Suren ERKMAN, Vers une écologie industrielle, Comment mettre en pratique le développement durable dans une société hyper-industrielle ?, p. 12-13, Paris, Fondation Charles Léopold Mayer, 2e éd., 2004 (1998).

[9] The Circular Model, Brief History and Schools of Thought, Ellen MacArthur Foundation, Rethink the Futur, 4 p., s.d. http://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/

[10] John T. LYLE, Regenerative Design for Sustainable Development, New York, John Wilmey & Sons, 1994.

http://www.csupomona.edu/~crs/

[11] William Mc DONOUGH & Michael BRAUNGART, The Next Industrial Revolution, in The Atlantic, October 1, 1998. http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1998/10/the-next-industrial-revolution/304695/ – W. McDONOUGH & M. BRAUNGART, Cradle to Cradle, Créer et recycler à l’infini, Paris, Editions alternatives, 4e éd., 2011.

[12] Walter R. STAHEL, The Performance Economy, London, Palgrave MacMillan, 2006.

[13] Roland CLIFT, Beyond the « Circular Economy », Stocks, Flows and Quality of Life, The Annual Roland Clift Lecture on Industrial Ecology, November 6, 2013.

[14] Janine M. BENUYS, Biomimicry, Innovation inspired by Nature, New York, William Morrow, 1997. – Biomimétisme, Quand la nature inspire les innovations durables, Paris, Rue de l’Echiquier, 2011.

[15] Gunter PAULI, The Blue Economy, 10 Years, 100 Innovations, 100 Million Jobs, Taos N.M., Paradigm, 2010.

[16] Richard ROUQUET et Doris NICKLAUS, Comparaison internationale des politiques publiques en matière d’économie circulaire, coll. Etudes et documents, n° 101, Commissariat général au Développement durable, Janvier 2014. Les auteurs précisent, p. 9, que La réutilisation, en boucle, des matières n’est possible ni pour la production d’énergie à partir de combustibles fossiles, ni pour les matières qui font l’objet d’usages dispersifs. De ce fait, l’utilisation de la biomasse (y compris bois) pour la production d’énergies ou de matériaux est un élément essentiel dans la transition vers une économie circulaire.

[17] En pratique, écrivait le CGDD en novembre 2013 : prendre en compte des impacts environnementaux sur l’ensemble du cycle de vie d’un produit et les intégrer dès sa conception, favoriser le réemploi, la réparation des produits, privilégier l’usage à la possession ou la vente d’un service plutôt qu’un bien, recycler les matières issues des déchets, mettre en place des « symbioses industrielles » ou mutualiser des services sur un territoire, voici autant d’actions à mettre en œuvre pour une transition vers une économie circulaire. L’économie circulaire, un nouveau modèle économique, Paris, Commissariat général au Développement durable, Novembre 2013, p. 1.

[18] Osons l’économie circulaire, dans C’est le moment d’agir, n° 59, ADEME, Octobre 2012, p. 7. – Smaïl AÏT-EL-HADJ et Vincent BOLY, Eco conception, conception et innovation, Les nouveaux défis de l’entreprise, Paris, L’Harmattan, 2013.

[19] Sharon PRENDEVILLE, Chris SANDERS, Jude SHERRY, Filipa COSTA, L’économie circulaire suffit-elle ?, p. 2, Ecodesign Centre Wales – Pôle Eco-conception et Management du Cycle de Vie, Mars 2014.

[20] Economie circulaire : bénéfices socio-économiques de l’éco-conception et de l’écologie industrielle, dans ADEME et vous, Stratégie et études, n° 33, 10 octobre 2012, p. 2.

[21] Suren ERKMAN, Vers une écologie industrielle…, p. 13.

[22] Osons l’économie circulaire…, p. 7. – Thomas E. GRAEDEL et Braden R. ALLENBY, Industrial Ecology, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice Hall, 1995.

[23] Atemis, Analyse du Travail et des Mutations de l’Industrie et des Services, 28 janvier 2014. – voir Christian du TERTRE, Economie de la fonctionnalité, développement durable et innovations institutionnelles, dans Edith HEURGON dir., Economie des services pour un développement durable, p. 142-255, Paris, L’Harmattan, 2007.

[24] Réemploi, réparation et réutilisation, Données 2012, Synthèse, p. 6, Angers, ADEME, 2013.

[25] The conservation of resources through more effective manufacturing processes, the reuse of materials as found in natural systems, a change in values from quantity to quality, and investing in natural capital, or restoring and sustaining natural resources. Paul HAWKEN, Amory LOVINS & L. Hunter LOVINS, Natural Capitalism, Creating the Next Industrial Revolution, Little, Brown & Cie, 1999.

[26] Ibidem.

[27] Gro Harlem BRUNDTLAND, Notre avenir à tous, Nations Unies, 1987, p. 168, 173 et 177.

Cliquer pour accéder à rapport_brundtland.pdf

[28] Christian du TERTRE, L’économie de la fonctionnalité, pour un développement plus durable, Intervention aux journées de l’économie Produire autrement pour vivre mieux, p. 3, Paris, 8 novembre 2012. http///www.touteconomie.org/jeco/181_537.pdf